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Would this pre-publication strategy work? (1 Viewer)

sunaynaprasad

WF Veterans
I took an online course with videos that show authors effective ways that can get them more preorders. With my last book, I tried that method, too. Unfortunately, it didn't really work.
My incentive was that anyone who preordered the eBook could win an iPad (but only one would win) as long as he or she emailed me a copy of the preorder receipt. That is what the instructor did for his preorder strategy, although he didn't offer a prize to a random person.
So, I decided to reach out to a bestselling author's contact person (possibly like an agent) for the rights to give away a free digital copy of that book and promise not to make money off of it. I got no response, so I gave up with that, told myself, "Forget it," and moved on.
The good news is that you can give away free digital copies of public domain stories, which I am considering when I launch my next book and put it on preorder.
It'll be a while since this story is still in the early stages of writing. However, many sites say to prepare yourself with a marketing plan to your audience and build connections long before your story is ready to be published.
Another thing to note is that this WIP is the 4th installment of my book series, and the first 3 are published.
I don't know if anyone tried rewarding customers who preordered copies of their books with a public domain story. I ask because the other incentives I've found online were either only for non-fiction or household name authors.
I am starting to build connections with bloggers by liking and commenting on their posts and will continue that for a while, even after the 4th book is published.
What do you think?
 

Olly Buckle

Mentor
Patron
I really don't know what might be effective, you would need to try them to find out. It did strike me that an i-pad is a fairly expensive piece of kit, you would have to sell a fair number of books to pay for it before turning any extra profit, and you might be far better off pursuing schemes that require minimal capital outlay.

Local media outlets serve a fairly large audience and are always on the lookout for people to interview between the music, and people who have something more to say than "Hello auntie Vi" are likely to get used; drop them an e-mail, that costs nothing.
 

sunaynaprasad

WF Veterans
That sounds good. What I do notice, however, is that marketing later installments of a series doesn't work too well unless you're a big name, like James Patterson. Maybe I can publish a short story on Amazon, have it on pre-order, and try my incentive for anyone who pre-orders it. It would still be in the genre I write in, which is older children's fantasy.
 

Olly Buckle

Mentor
Patron
What I do notice, however, is that marketing later installments of a series doesn't work too well
So push the first installment of a story that keeps growing and growing. I really think you are on a loser pursuing the pre-order thing. I don't know, but it is my guess, that most YA readers don't buy their own books, they get them as presents or borrow from libraries. If that's true maybe advertising should be aimed at present givers. any advertising to the consumers would be on the 'Here's what to ask for' lines, rather than pre-ordering.
 

sunaynaprasad

WF Veterans
I guess that should work, although I would assume the parents are buying the books for their kids. But maybe pre-orders are less successful with children's ebooks. I noticed that most people I've encountered, including younger ones, prefer print books over digital. And Amazon doesn't give pre-orders for print books an option.
I actually do try and stick with the first installment when promoting my series to audiences, like bloggers and ebook promotion services. The thing is that the first book is perma free, so I believe the vast majority of the people who downloaded it aren't in my target audience. It is common for anyone to download anything just because it's free. I figured this out because I only get between 10 and 15 sales of the next 2 books a month on average.
 
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