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World Building Five Days Later (1 Viewer)

TheMightyAz

Mentor
I started a thread on Friday titled 'Is world building necessarily?' and got, more or less, what I required from the comments, or at confirmation I needn't worry too much. Well ... that was then and this is now! How 5 days can change everything.

Aryngroth had bought Avshom Manor and let it go to rack and ruin, orchestrating her plans from there (secret for now) and taking payments from the rich in order to keep out of their way. Once a thriving city when the former owner of Avshom Manor, Brett Cordell, was alive and charitable, much of it has fallen into poverty with the wealthiest gathering at the edges east of the city. The rich got richer and the poorer suffered because of it.

When Yarrod, Fiddlesticks and Frereleise finally drive Aryngroth from the manor, Frereleise feels partly responsible (she's secretly a Dannuck) and pledges to restore the manor to its former glory and help the poor return to something approaching a good life. She begins with the manor itself, using the money Aryngroth has been hording. Then she restores the stables and the vineyards beyond.

The road that leads from the manor to the main street cuts straight through the poorest area. Frereleise buys a few properties along that street and turns them into shops, warehouses and bedsits. She allows people to run these places, taking a percentage of the earnings. Slowly she invests more money in the area, particularly down the street connecting to the main street, having lights installed to cast aside the shadows.

Soon there's a thriving community and those in the east, the rich folk, see their profits dropping. This creates conflict between Frereleise and the rich folk. They do all they can to put her out of business but fail. And then try money and bribery, but fail. Everyone respects her and begin to disrespect the authorities and dignitaries in the east.

Just this little bit of world building has given me so many ideas for events and interactions. It's also meant more time will have to pass, meaning both Yarrod and Fiddlesticks need to be delayed in their journey forward through the actual meat of the story. Now Thelendor, which was once only a stop off point during their adventure, has suddenly become a huge part of it, almost a character onto itself.

So, yeah, I still don't think worldbuilding is necessary but I also realise now it's often a great way of expanding a story in an interesting way.
 

Theglasshouse

WF Veterans
I think you know I think that you are a good writer. Llyralen was trying to tell you what a female would think. Don't forget what agents could ask for when they give submission guidelines. I know you don't want to self publish. Horror has a lot of room for tolerance. Be careful. World building in horror is interesting. I'd go with what readers say if I' were in doubt. Or you could try to please both audiences.
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
I think you know I think that you are a good writer. Llyralen was trying to tell you what a female would think. Don't forget what agents could ask for when they give submission guidelines. I know you don't want to self publish. Horror has a lot of room for tolerance. Be careful. World building in horror is interesting. I'd go with what readers say if I' were in doubt. Or you could try to please both audiences.
Have you posted in the wrong thread? This is about world building. Regardless, I'm not writing for a market, I'm writing for myself. If in writing for myself, I find a market, great. If I don't, so be it.

I'v got to be honest, I'll be so glad when this practice period is over. lol
 

Theglasshouse

WF Veterans
Personally I like world building. It's the kind of writing I read. Lord of the rings was full of world building. I read the whole book except for the ending. I took a while summer reading it slowly. I wanted to know more about the history. Though he developed it since he had an intense desire to study myth and folklore. He was actually a professor in oxford. He specialized in Celtic culture which is where some of the Lord of the rings origins can be found. I feel somewhat that it's enjoyable but takes a lot of research and time! Can it enhance a work? Most definetly. For example, the original necromancer take is about a person that cannot leave the city or they will die. If not they could die because the necromancer's spell is in effect. I might give it a try. World building is a culture that when done right can seem very interesting to readers. Its escaping from the mundane everyday drudgery of life. I wish science fiction had more mythical roots but it does have some.
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
Personally I like world building. It's the kind of writing I read. Lord of the rings was full of world building. I read the whole book except for the ending. I took a while summer reading it slowly. I wanted to know more about the history. Though he developed it since he had an intense desire to study myth and folklore. He was actually a professor in oxford. He specialized in Celtic culture which is where some of the Lord of the rings origins can be found. I feel somewhat that it's enjoyable but takes a lot of research and time! Can it enhance a work? Most definetly. For example, the original necromancer take is about a person that cannot leave the city or they will die. If not they could die because the necromancer's spell is in effect. I might give it a try. World building is a culture that when done right can seem very interesting to readers. Its escaping from the mundane everyday drudgery of life. I wish science fiction had more mythical roots but it does have some.
The Sixth Chamber was originally going to be Sci-fi/fantasy.
 

Theglasshouse

WF Veterans
Lots of writers adapt folktales and myths. I'm guessing the concept of immortality came from Gilgamesh which is a Greek myth. I will try to read some myself. It never hurts to read the original tales from which all sorts of new works have emerged. I know Gilgamesh was influential as a short story. There are a bunch of tropes on it. Going to the source of the myth such as the Death character being in many works. Such as in Terry Pratchett's works. I haven't done it lately. I only once adopted a grim fairy tale. Well actually and Pandora's box as well. But I've been sort of lazy and if writing in these genres one should read anything that could inspire.
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
Lots of writers adapt folktales and myths. I'm guessing the concept of immortality came from Gilgamesh which is a Greek myth. I will try to read some myself. It never hurts to read the original tales from which all sorts of new works have emerged. I know Gilgamesh was influential as a short story. There are a bunch of tropes on it. Going to the source of the myth such as the Death character being in many works. Such as in Terry Pratchett's works. I haven't done it lately. I only once adopted a grim fairy tale. Well actually and Pandora's box as well. But I've been sort of lazy and if writing in these genres one should read anything that could inspire.
To be honest, I deliberately avoid anything related to past folktales and myths. Some things people imagine will inevitably mirror something else but you've got a much better chance of coming up with something original if you create everything from your own imagination. I'd sooner build myths than be influenced by them. The only way of doing that is to avoid them altogether.
 

Llyralen

Senior Member
Sounds exciting!
The economics of the rich and poor might need a bit more research.

I understand a bit more about your definition of world-building now. I have these experiences myself where thinking of the mechanics of that world supplies conflict and conundrums or resources and solutions. Woot!
 

Ralph Rotten

Staff member
Mentor
I only world-build as much as the story requires. Some stories require an entire universe, others can be left to the reader's imagination.
It all depends on the story. There are no hard and fast rules on the topic.
 
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