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Where next. (1 Viewer)

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Olly Buckle

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Mist Wolf posted this link,

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2...lps-big-moment

It is a reasonably long article, but interesting and it kept me reading right through to the last sentence, that was the one which prompted this thread. It seemed to imply that publishing has finally arrived somewhere, and this is it, here we stay.

No, life is always moving on, things change. This current pandemic is going to change things, there will be people working from home far more. Even if things get back to normal more I have spoken to several people who say "It has opened eyes, why should the company spend £100,000 a year on premises they don't need?" Selling books from news stands could go the way of many bookshops.

How about his for a scenario, a YouTube type channel presenting shorts free to listen to, by various authors, with links to download their longer works as audio books? Cheap to produce, no need to carry big stocks or front a premises for sales. You could get readers to rate the shorts, 0-5 stars and provide reviews to the books. The shorts would make a nice break if you were working on the computer all day, and in manufacturing people doing mechanical work like something different from continuous pop music sometimes.

What is the next big way to sell a story?
 

Taylor

Staff member
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I like the idea that surfaced in another thread on new genres, that explores the possibility of fictional stories with underlying educational non-fiction that is part of a university curriculum. Where would you sell it? To Wiley, Random House and other text book publishers.
 

bdcharles

Wɾ¡ʇ¡∩9
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I got page 404. But the New Yorker - hmm ... it seems like more of an opinion magazine. Interesting, not entirely unadjacent, but not definitive.
 

MistWolf

Senior Member
Cost of someone to read and record it is high.
But well worth it. I listen to Audible books everyday at work. The narrator will make or break a book. A good narrator can save a poorly written book, but a so-so narrator will destroy even the most interesting story.

If you're ever in a position to have an audio book produced, don't settle for just any narrator. Hold out for someone that will breathe life into it.
 

Olly Buckle

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Regarding the OP, what will be the next big development in publishing? Not 'what will be shut down?'

I kind of agree with Mist Wolfe that audio is a way to go. I think there is a future in writing for audio, quite often when reading I find things that are redundant when they are obvious from tone of voice. I suppose some sort of directions to the reader would be in order, as in plays.
 

Olly Buckle

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Cost of someone to read and record it is high.

The cost of manufacturing and transporting physical books to individual locations has to be pretty high, and fewer people seem to object to an audio book than electronic reading. If I was running a reasonable size publishing house for audio I would separate reading and editing for a start so a reader simply repeated and read on.

(My page is big, don't miss Darren's note above, that is an important subject too)
 

indianroads

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The cost of manufacturing and transporting physical books to individual locations has to be pretty high, and fewer people seem to object to an audio book than electronic reading. If I was running a reasonable size publishing house for audio I would separate reading and editing for a start so a reader simply repeated and read on.

(My page is big, don't miss Darren's note above, that is an important subject too)

I publish via Amazon KDP - most of my sales are eBooks rather than hardcopy. I'd like to get into audio, but I've researched the prices and they come to several thousand dollars for a 100K word book.
 

Olly Buckle

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I reckon to read through once to myself and once more aloud before I start, and I don't bother editing, though sometimes I re-record if I really screw up. Google reckons about 5.5 hours to read 100k words, so say eighteen hours for all three reads for a bit of leeway, plus, say, seven hours for a listen through and edit, that is 25 hours. Several thousand dollars seems a lot, though you couldn't do eight hour days, it would have to be split up.

Personally I rather like the occasional slip and don't think it detracts from the story, just makes it seem like a real person reading
 

Olly Buckle

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We wont have arrived until the sun implodes - "Man's grasp should exceed his reach."

There is some truth in this, but a few other things might happen before we reach that point. "All of us are living in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars."
 

EternalGreen

Senior Member
A lot of people are submitting stories because they are bored during the pandemic.

Once it's over, the dedicated long-haulers may dominate again.

(This isn't an attack on people who have to work shitty jobs to survive. A lot of people are already back to work; but as COVID essentially bans us from having social lives, a lot of people are writing and submitting stories who wouldn't otherwise be. Or that's my theory.)
 

BrandonTheWriter

Senior Member
A lot of people are submitting stories because they are bored during the pandemic.

Once it's over, the dedicated long-haulers may dominate again.

(This isn't an attack on people who have to work shitty jobs to survive. A lot of people are already back to work; but as COVID essentially bans us from having social lives, a lot of people are writing and submitting stories who wouldn't otherwise be. Or that's my theory.)

That is certainly a reason I got back in to Writing again. Was struggling to find ways to feel productive, and creative writing certainly helps to fill that gap.

I have always liked writing but having the motivation to do so is an entirely different beast. I'm currently feeling down on myself again and not sure when I'll write again now.
 

EternalGreen

Senior Member
That is certainly a reason I got back in to Writing again. Was struggling to find ways to feel productive, and creative writing certainly helps to fill that gap.

I have always liked writing but having the motivation to do so is an entirely different beast. I'm currently feeling down on myself again and not sure when I'll write again now.

I am sorry to hear you are discouraged. I was referring to people who write, not because they enjoy it a lot, but because they are bored.
 

BrandonTheWriter

Senior Member
I am sorry to hear you are discouraged. I was referring to people who write, not because they enjoy it a lot, but because they are bored.

Even if it is only a temporary thing, I still think it's one of the better things people could pick up. Even out of boredom. It's easy enough to just play a game or watch videos for hours these days. The fact someone settles on Creative Writing out of all of the easy things they could do is certainly welcomed by me.
 
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