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What ticks you off when reading a book/story? (1 Viewer)

Summerhaze

Senior Member
Seriously when I'm reading stories or books I seem to find things annoying. they may not be gramaticaly incorrect or anything it's just the general read of it.

What ticks me off the most is when a writer uses the same adverb more than once in a paragraph or two. Seriously, get a thesaurus!

At the moment I'm reading Stephen Kings "The Mist". I just saw the new movie of it and whenever I see a movie based on a book I always want to read the book afterward. Like About A Boy I got the movie for Christmas from my brother because he lives for movies, and always wants to get me a movie but he also knows that I LOVE Nick Hornby. Yesterday I watched the movie before reaidng the book and now I REALLY want to read the book even thought I heard from many people that it was they're least favouite of them all.

ANYWAYS

As I'm reading "The Mist" I have noticed alot of this almost every page of the second chapter he used the same adverb, and sometimes even the same verb in the same paragraph.



WHAT TICKS YOU OFF WHEN READING?
 

ClancyBoy

Senior Member
I remember The Mist. King used the word "acrid" a lot.

The thing that pisses me off the most is really transparent plotting. I know how 90% of stories are going to play out and end just based on the first chapter.

And yet the vast majority of creative writing classes and writing books tell you you have to write that way.
 
I hate when they put long articles.
Like, if the character is reading a newspaper
And it just goes on, and on.
I loose focus, and just skip over them
And hope I didn't miss anything key.


J. K. Rowling is a bit guilty of that
 

Pete_C

WF Veterans
Like, if I'm reading a murder mystery, and some dumb cop is a redhead on Page 37, then on Page 154 she has black hair. That type of thing REALLY pisses me off.
Why does a ginger bint trying to better herself by dying her hair a human colour annoy you so much?
 

The Backward OX

WF Veterans
Why does a ginger bint trying to better herself by dying her hair a human colour annoy you so much?
Perhaps you were jesting. If not, maybe I should have taken my usual amount of time over a post, and expressed myself more clearly. What pisses me off are obvious contradictions not picked up by the Copyeditor. Even when they are chapters apart I see them.
 

Pete_C

WF Veterans
I once knew an Australian girl who, in a fit of boredom, dyed her pubes. When I expressed surprise at blue pubic hair, she reassured me saying: 'It's okay, they're not naturally that colour. I dyed them.'

No shit, Sherlock.
 

RebelGoddess

Senior Member
Anyway...

Agreed on the obvious contradictions and the rediculously repetitive words.

I really, really, really hate it when I'm reading a book and the main character is either one dimentional in every way or a complete cliche (sometimes both).

It just really irks me when the character is moving through the plot like a retarded robot or something.

I also can't stand pages and pages of diologue or pages and pages of prose with not break up.

Racheal
 

howowiginal

Senior Member
It annoys me when authors use their characters to express their own opinions, especially if it serves no purpose to the story.

Unnecessary details are the most annoying. That's one of the reasons I couldn't finish Twilight by Stephanie Meyer.
 

Mr Sci Fi

Senior Member
I get ticked off when I realize that I can write twice as well as the author, and he's published.
 
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SevenWritez

Senior Member
I hate unnecessary details, random tangents that stray from the plot to express an/a "ingenious/philosophical" opinion, or shitty plots that get praised by critics. I'm looking at YOU, The Thirteenth Tale. Ugh.
 

Ilasir Maroa

Senior Member
I hate the use of the word "kloven" to describe anything but hoovs. I also hate when an auther writes a book with no conpletely randon tangenz having little to do with the plod, and a lot to do with the author's girlfriend boyfriend running awf with the next-door neighbor. And also sepelling gramerr punctuuation erors.
 

boongee

Senior Member
I hate it when the narrator decides to give away something that's going to happen soon but withholds necessary information. It sounds really corny and cliche and reminds me a little bit too much of a Goosebumps book. For example, the last sentence in a chapter would be:

But that would be the last time he would go in that building for a long, long time.
 

The Backward OX

WF Veterans
I hate it when the narrator decides to give away something that's going to happen soon but withholds necessary information. It sounds really corny and cliche and reminds me a little bit too much of a Goosebumps book. For example, the last sentence in a chapter would be:

But that would be the last time he would go in that building for a long, long time.
Au contraire, my friend. I agree entirely that the wording as quoted by you is corny and cliche, however the concept, if expressed more better:-k, is a way to keep the reader interested.
 

The Backward OX

WF Veterans
I hate the use of the word "kloven" to describe anything but hoovs. I also hate when an auther writes a book with no conpletely randon tangenz having little to do with the plod, and a lot to do with the author's girlfriend boyfriend running awf with the next-door neighbor. And also sepelling gramerr punctuuation erors.

Rounding the corner of the quarter-deck cabin, his wooden stump echoing hollowly on the bloodied timbers, his parrot on his shoulder squawking “Pieces of Eight! Pieces of Eight!”, Blackbeard came upon on a terrible sight.

There at the foot of the mizzen-mast lay the body of his foe Robert Maynard, his skull cloven by a spar that had obviously become dislodged during the storm.

“Damn ye, ye yellow-bellied sapsucker!” he roared, “Ye’ve done me out of a fight!”
 
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SevenWritez

Senior Member
however the concept, if expressed more better:-k, is a way to keep the reader interested.

Nah, it's just a cheap, shitty way to push the reader onward. So many contemporary writers today don't know how to make a character that is engaging, a setting that is unqiue, or a scene that is vivid. For this fucking ubiquitous flaw, paired alongside the growing rate of shitty writing taking up mainstream attention, we are handed little strands of, "Oh, look at this! But wait, there's more...just...just read fifty more pages first, ok? Please? Buy my next book? Yeah? I failed as a journalist?"

Sorry, that was a rant, but it's been such a long time since I cared about a character in a story, and it's been eating away at me. I seriously don't enjoy reading as much as I used to.
 
T

Truth-Teller

I hate it when the narrator decides to give away something that's going to happen soon but withholds necessary information. It sounds really corny and cliche and reminds me a little bit too much of a Goosebumps book. For example, the last sentence in a chapter would be:

But that would be the last time he would go in that building for a long, long time.

This is the most egregious sin King commits. He tells you the main character is going to die, and then goes about telling you--in the next one hundred pages--he dies. :-?

He never goes with the flow, but, rather, wants to reveal everything beforehand--killing the surprise.
 
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