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what is a way to describe a fit of laughter? (1 Viewer)

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AdiaGrace

Member
I'm writing a scene where two bestfriends are mimicking eachother and they fall into a fit of laughter. I want to describe the scene as joyus. Can you guys help me with some ways to describe their laughter?
 

Phil Istine

WF Veterans
I'm writing a scene where two bestfriends are mimicking eachother and they fall into a fit of laughter. I want to describe the scene as joyus. Can you guys help me with some ways to describe their laughter?

Gales of laughter could work, but it is in fairly common use so some would regard it as a cliché. Guffawing might work too.
There is a handy little website called rhymezone. It's not just about rhyming words though. If you type laughter into the left-hand box and select "find descriptive words" in the right hand box, it will give you lists of words that (a) describe laughter and (b) that laughter describes. It's more fun to figure out your own words, but rhymezone is useful for when you get stuck.
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
I'm writing a scene where two bestfriends are mimicking eachother and they fall into a fit of laughter. I want to describe the scene as joyus. Can you guys help me with some ways to describe their laughter?

If you remember there's a lot more to laughing than the sound that comes out of your mouth, you'll get a better handle on things. Try putting your imagination on mute and write the scene without sound but still show the two characters are in hysterics. THEN add sound.
 

Matchu

Senior Member
I'm writing a scene where two bestfriends are mimicking eachother and they fall into a fit of laughter. I want to describe the scene as joyus. Can you guys help me with some ways to describe their laughter?

Write it out first time as you see it in your head. Look at the screen, put yourself into the scene and act it all out, increasing your original thirty words toward 100 words. When you are laughing on your own at the idiocy you have created then probably it is as good as you'll get in respects of joy, then you see if others can share the ride when reading your work.

If nobody does even smile when reading your extract then assume it is society's fault, you did your best, soldier.
 

vranger

Staff member
Supervisor
Gales of laughter could work, but it is in fairly common use so some would regard it as a cliché. Guffawing might work too.
There is a handy little website called rhymezone. It's not just about rhyming words though. If you type laughter into the left-hand box and select "find descriptive words" in the right hand box, it will give you lists of words that (a) describe laughter and (b) that laughter describes. It's more fun to figure out your own words, but rhymezone is useful for when you get stuck.

If you look back in my blogs a bit, you'll see that on average, guffaw is only used once per every ten 100K word books. The problem here is that I used it twice in my last book, so some poor author is going to have to write ten books before they can even use it the first time. :-( Makes me feel a bit selfish here.

However, you can laugh, chuckle, giggle, and snicker much more often without running afoul of the odds.
 

Matchu

Senior Member
Guffaw only works if you’re referencing octogenarian fireside - breaking from his regular tempo - after your [adolescent] suggestion ‘Indeed, Abba won the battle of Waterloo..’ (example) ‘Tell me more about Napoleon?’
 

Phil Istine

WF Veterans
Guffaw only works if you’re referencing octogenarian fireside - breaking from his regular tempo - after your [adolescent] suggestion ‘Indeed, Abba won the battle of Waterloo..’ (example) ‘Tell me more about Napoleon?’

Sure, as ever the word choices would need to reflect on the focal character(s).
 

EternalGreen

Senior Member
Remember to focus on how it feels. Tears itching as they roll down your face. Cheeks aching. A stringing cone in the abdomen if you're laughing REALLY hard and out of shape.
 

Irwin

Senior Member
It depends on your voice. If you're just a regular Jill or Joe, you might say, "We cracked up! Nearly pissed our pants!" whereas if you're very proper, you might say, "Indubitably, we quaked with unfeigned mirth."
 

EternalGreen

Senior Member
It depends on your voice. If you're just a regular Jill or Joe, you might say, "We cracked up! Nearly pissed our pants!" whereas if you're very proper, you might say, "Indubitably, we quaked with unfeigned mirth."

Both of these are telling not showing, however.
 

Matchu

Senior Member
‘In other news...a so-called “diseased creature”, accused of pissing himself and wilfully spitting coffee upon computer screens at the merest honk of a twat’s horn, was today brought before a federal judge...’

etc..
 
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Twisted Head

Senior Member
I'm writing a scene where two bestfriends are mimicking eachother and they fall into a fit of laughter. I want to describe the scene as joyus. Can you guys help me with some ways to describe their laughter?

You could try using a simile. One of my favorite authors, Raymond Chandler did it quite well. Here's are a couple of examples from his works.

“He looked about as inconspicuous as a tarantula on a slice of angel food.” – Farewell, My Lovely
“A few locks of dry, white hair clung to his scalp, like wild flowers fighting for life on a bare rock.” – The Big Sleep

If you're describing the scene, you could start with, "We laughed like two chimpanzees who..."

Sometimes telling works instead of getting overly descriptive.
 

PSFoster

Senior Member
Uncontollable giggling, tears running down their faces, wiping snot from their noses, and an occasional snort.
 

Taylor

Staff member
Global Moderator
You have to frame it on either side depending on your scenario, but...

Amy laughed so hard she snorted, which caused Jan to buckle over barely getting out the words, "I'm going to pee myself."
 
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