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:?: What books do you recommend I should read:?: (1 Viewer)

Saponification

Senior Member
Pfft. Genre.

Check out The Beach by Alex Garland. Don't worry if you've seen the movie, it's a suck arse adaptation. I'm yet to read it, but it's sitting on my bookshelf - The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon. It's about this kid who decides to solve the murder of next door's dog. That description sounds kinda lame, but the book itself is very good.
 

Marsieux

Senior Member
If you like fantasy, try The Wheel of Time by Robert Jordan. He can drag and the books are way long, but he ties everything together very neatly and he's full of conflict. His one weak point, though (and I'm not trying to offend any of the ladies), but when he writes from a girls perspective, he stinks. He writes much better when he tells of Rand's or Perrin's perspective. You'll like them if you like fantasy. I read all ten volumes in three months time.
 

Saponification

Senior Member
A lot of authors suck at female characters. John Marsden is pretty laughable. In parts of Tomorrow, When the War Began he comes across as a pedophile.
 

lisajane

Senior Member
I wouldn't say a lot of authors suck at writing female characters. What about female authors? They suck at writing female characters?

One of the hardest things of writing is to write in a character of the opposite sex - it's generally difficult for female authors to write as a male character and vice versa. My own male characters in first person I feel have strong feminine qualities.

With John Marsden being one of my most favourite authors, I think he does write in a female character brilliantly. I find I can relate to them better, and have difficulty relating to Tony from Dear Miffy (Miffy, I think, is fantastic as a character). I think it suits him to write in female characters and I love how he does it.
 

Mazzie

Member
Saponification said:
Pfft. Genre.

Check out The Beach by Alex Garland. Don't worry if you've seen the movie, it's a suck arse adaptation. I'm yet to read it, but it's sitting on my bookshelf - The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon. It's about this kid who decides to solve the murder of next door's dog. That description sounds kinda lame, but the book itself is very good.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is so funny, especially when it's described why the characters doesn't like certain things... :lol:
 

Kane

Senior Member
lisajane said:
I wouldn't say a lot of authors suck at writing female characters. What about female authors? They suck at writing female characters?

One of the hardest things of writing is to write in a character of the opposite sex - it's generally difficult for female authors to write as a male character and vice versa. My own male characters in first person I feel have strong feminine qualities.

With John Marsden being one of my most favourite authors, I think he does write in a female character brilliantly. I find I can relate to them better, and have difficulty relating to Tony from Dear Miffy (Miffy, I think, is fantastic as a character). I think it suits him to write in female characters and I love how he does it.

hehe yeah, just look at Anne Rice's male characters... All effeminate, all have gay tendencies, all moody as hell. =)
 

PaPa

Senior Member
Kane said:
hehe yeah, just look at Anne Rice's male characters... All effeminate, all have gay tendencies, all moody as hell. =)

You almost triggered me into writing a long invective concerning the appalling nature of Anne Rice's books, but I restrained myself.

Anyway, reccommended books - a near endless list can be produced, but I'll try and pick some out. I'll get the more obvious ones out of the way first:

Anything by Douglas Adams (particularly The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy), anything by Terry Pratchett (particularly Good Omens), anything by Isaac Asimov (particularly the Foundation trilogy).
The original Dune by Frank Herbert, but don't read the rest of the series because it sucks.
The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien

And some random books that I read recently and enjoyed:

Taking the Devil's Advice by Anne Fine
Cloud Atlas by some bloke. Some of it was quite good, other bits were less so.
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Very famous book, but try and forget the hype and read it as a stand alone piece.
Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell by Susannah Clarke. Very long book, but worth it.
Join Me by Danny Wallace(?). Amusing account of the author's attempt to establish a collective.
 

Pawn

Patron
PaPa said:
Anything by Douglas Adams (particularly The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy), anything by Terry Pratchett (particularly Good Omens), anything by Isaac Asimov (particularly the Foundation trilogy).
The original Dune by Frank Herbert, but don't read the rest of the series because it sucks.
The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
PaPa: he say it like it is.
 
I just started Inkheart which was recommended here (maybe) :?: or it may have been Young Writers Guild. Well anyway(s) its good so far :!: :sunny: :read: :book: :thumbl:
 

sammisan

Senior Member
I was reading advance books at your age too, sakari. Try Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton (I read that in fifth grade) or The Killer Angels by Michael Shaara. If you find yourself bored by "young adult" fiction, they should keep your attention. Though, on the young adult side, Tamora Pierce, Robin McKinley, Eion Colfer, and Herbie Brennan are definitely great authors worth reading. Be careful though...the authors I mentioned are highly addictive and you may find yourself doing nothing but reading them.
 

holdyoualways

Senior Member
sakarisheart said:
:?: Good books, not bad ones of course. I am 13 but read pretty advanced books sometimes. :?: :D

speak by laurie halse anderson
lightning by dean koontz
warning signs by stephen white
 

lisajane

Senior Member
holdyoualways said:
speak by laurie halse anderson

Also by Laurie Halse Anderson - Fever, 1793. Loved the book, and I rarely like reading anything set in this time period.
 

creational

Senior Member
dune is the best in the series!?!?!
the dune series starts well and gets better dune messiah, children of dune and god emperor of dune are excellent have you no taste? but sadly the fizzles out at the end eg. last book, but the last book is good but the final installment was never finished and so the last written book finishes with more to come and sadly it didnt come due to the death of f h but do read the series, herberts style and intelligence is second to none.
jrr tolkien, ac clarke, ursula le guin, anne rice, peter hamilton, anne mccaffrey,
 

colvin11

Senior Member
Dune is a good book but the rest suck. As far as I'm concerned Terry Prattchett can do no wrong (excepting 'wee free men' and 'hat full of sky')
 

Burnz

Senior Member
Personally, I like John Steinbeck. Of Mice and Men was a great book. Also Grapes of Wrath J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye was brilliant also. Still can't believe they banned Catcher in the rye from my high school library. Of course, they were pretty conservative there.
 
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