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What are you reading now? (2 Viewers)

Neetu

Friends of WF
I looked up Elif Shafak and she has written several novels. I might look up some in my virtual libraries. I can't imagine you enjoying a book that tells you how to stay sane, Kat. I can't imagine me doing that either!
I enjoy reading diverse writers from around the world and the book I just picked up is called The Return and it's a Pulitzer prize winning novel by a Libyan writer, Hisham Matar. Will review after I finish reading it!
 

clark

Staff member
Chief Mentor
Working on reading Murakami's The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle which, to my surprise, reminds me in tone and 'cultural' psychology to Forster's Passage to India, which makes no sense whatever, but who knows where one's sense of personal analogies comes from? And I must assume Jay Rubin's translation from the original Japanese is sensitive to both details of content and nuances of tone. This is my first Murakami novel and I'm very impressed. Intend to read more.
 

Neetu

Friends of WF
If there are any readers here of historical fiction, memoirs, etc, please do suggest some of your favorite books! I would love to know.
 

Olly Buckle

Mentor
Patron
If there are any readers here of historical fiction, memoirs, etc, please do suggest some of your favorite books! I would love to know.
My favourites
Hillary Mantel for fiction.
Christopher Hill for non-fiction, 'The world turned upside down' was particularly readable.
 

Pamelyn Casto

WF Veterans
I'm compiling a list of favorite/ recommended poetry/ flash fiction "how to" books and the book I'm presently exploring (again) is Robert Hass's A Little Book on Form: An Exploration into the Formal Imagination of Poetry (2017). Hass is a Pulitzer Prize Winner (and winner of many writing awards) and clearly demonstrates his skill as a writer. I will definitely include this book in my list of recommendations. It's quite an interesting book and I was rather surprised to discover that.
 

Neetu

Friends of WF
Doesn't Murakami seem fixated on cats? I haven't read any of his works but have read a little about them in random places. Curious you find it reminds you of A Passage to India....
 

Neetu

Friends of WF
I just found an Elif Shafak novel with excellent reviews at my virtual library which I plan to read now. Will see how it "feels" to me. It's called The Forty Rules of Love. It's about Rumi and his companion and tells two parallel stories in the context of two different cultures and time periods.
 

Monaque

Senior Member
@Neetu - If you are a fan of historical fiction but not fussed about the country of origin then a series of books by C J Sansom featuring a character called Shardlake is excellent - wonderfully written.
 

Neetu

Friends of WF
@Neetu - If you are a fan of historical fiction but not fussed about the country of origin then a series of books by C J Sansom featuring a character called Shardlake is excellent - wonderfully written.

Monaque, I am a fan of historical fiction! And my goodness, to fuss about the country of origin would diminish me as a reader! I have found such incredible power in many of these books from all sorts of countries as long as they are in English. It gives me insight into cultures and attitudes far more interesting than in the plain reading of historical texts. Thank you for the recommendation. I will absolutely look it up and see if I can get it at one of the libraries I am member of.
 

Monaque

Senior Member
Monaque, I am a fan of historical fiction! And my goodness, to fuss about the country of origin would diminish me as a reader! I have found such incredible power in many of these books from all sorts of countries as long as they are in English. It gives me insight into cultures and attitudes far more interesting than in the plain reading of historical texts. Thank you for the recommendation. I will absolutely look it up and see if I can get it at one of the libraries I am member of.
No worries, I'm sure you will enjoy them.
 

EternalGreen

Senior Member
I'm reading Left Hand of Darkness by Le Guin, and to be honest, I don't really care for it.

It feels like an adjective soup. She hits you with word after word after word telling you how things went, but I do not feel that most of the events were actually made to transpire using words.

It's an interesting world and you're almost guaranteed to learn a few vocabulary words, so at least there's that.
 

Monaque

Senior Member
I'm reading Left Hand of Darkness by Le Guin, and to be honest, I don't really care for it.

It feels like an adjective soup. She hits you with word after word after word telling you how things went, but I do not feel that most of the events were actually made to transpire using words.

It's an interesting world and you're almost guaranteed to learn a few vocabulary words, so at least there's that.
She's supposed to be good, in the top whatever books to read she's always in there.
 

Tiamat

Patron
Anxious People by Fredrik Backman.

I'm about halfway through, and I love it. It manages to pull off being simultaneously hilarious and breath-takingly poignant. Also, I love the way it's told, almost like a fairy tale--one where the narrator might be a little shady. Definitely recommend!
 

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