Writing Forums

Writing Forums is a privately-owned, community managed writing environment. We provide an unlimited opportunity for writers and poets of all abilities, to share their work and communicate with other writers and creative artists. We offer an experience that is safe, welcoming and friendly, regardless of your level of participation, knowledge or skill. There are several opportunities for writers to exchange tips, engage in discussions about techniques, and grow in your craft. You can also participate in forum competitions that are exciting and helpful in building your skill level. There's so much more for you to explore!

What are you reading now? (2 Viewers)

Jon M

WF Veterans
You know the deal.

At the moment, I'm reading The Red Pony by Steinbeck. It's about a pony. A red pony named Gabilan.
 
Last edited:

Kevin

WF Veterans
Outliers by Malcom Gladwell. 10,000 hours, genetic predisposition vs. environment. The Canadian hockey system and why players born in certain months never make it. Darwinian economics and timing...lots of concepts that blow things out of the water. What did someone once say? Something like "...and then there are the thoughts that others came up with, which you simply accept as your own." This book challenges those thoughts.
 
Last edited:

Jon M

WF Veterans
Two other books finally arrived today -- The Night In Question by Tobias Wolff, and Shiloh & Other Stories by Bobbie Ann Mason. Only got a few pages into each, but I can tell they're good. Can't wait to dig in over the next couple of days.
 

Terry D

Retired Supervisor
11/22/63 by Stephen King. A very different book from most of his past work, highly detailed, well written and thought provoking. It's also a good work-out for the hands and forearms at 800+ pages.
 

ppsage

WF Veterans
Couple of oldies from the library ...

Always Going Home by Ursula LeGuin. A massive pseudo-ethnography of the Kesh, a tribe of earth-humans in the distant future. I may purchase this for reference. LeGuin at her insidiously neferious best.

Listening to Inherent Vice (=Original Sin?) by Thomas Pynchon. Massively hilarious, a bit hard to follow without seeing the character names. Not sure how I skipped Pynchon in my unruly youth.
 

Kyle R

WF Veterans
Mockingjay, by Suzanne Collins. (Book three in The Hunger Games trilogy).

I find her writing for the first two books to be a bit slow and tedius in the First Act, (a bit too much focus on tasty foods and pretty clothes) but she always makes up for it with intensity and action in the Third Act.

The third book seems to be starting off at a more respectable pace, as (finally) the irrelevant stuff has been wiped away. Her world-building is very unique, and the plot is impressing me more and more as it develops. There are several layers of conflict occuring at once, from the personal (the protagonist's struggle to stay alive) to the interpersonal (her conflicting, budding romance with two male protagonists), to the societal (her blossoming role in a larger war between two factions of humanity).

The writing prose itself doesn't impress me, but the story itself is quite engaging. I can see why it's so popular.

I'm also reading Kafka on the Shore, by Haruki Murakami, which reads quite simply (though I'm wondering if things have been lost in the Japanese to English translation), with a hint of the supernatural. From reading Murakami's short stories, I'm sure there will be some unexpected twists. There are currently two plot lines happening simultaneously, and I'm sure somehow the two protagonists will end up converging in the end. Looking forward to seeing how it develops.

And lastly, I'm reading: A Visit from the Goon Squad, by Jennifer Egan. I don't think any modern writer today can compete with Egan in terms of intellectual flair. Her prose smacks of so much erudition that it actually makes me feel like a simpleton at times. She's juggling a plethora of characters in this book, and each chapter jumps to different heads, different time periods, and different forms of writing style. It's all superb, but also a bit challenging to keep track of where the storyline lies. I'm sure when it's over it'll all make sense, though. Hopefully it's not too far over my head.
 

philistine

Senior Member
I've got a couple of things in play at the moment, namely, a selection of poems by Arthur Rimbaud, also, a very large compendium of Spenser's works. This very moment, I'm re-reading The Great Gatsby, as it's been several years.
 

Katie D

Senior Member
Somewhere behind the morning - Frances McNiel.
A paper back I picked up from my local thrift shop.
It's the first grown up book I've read that's written in diary form. Young Julia, the daughter of a working class German immigrant struggles to hold her family together in pre war england 1914.
I am enjoying the rough yet clever style of writing. It is anything but over written and pompous without being simple. The author captures Julia's witty stubbornness and determination which has me rooting for her to succeed and therefore established an emotional connection between character and reader.
 

Sunny

WF Veterans
Delirium by Lauren Oliver. I've read it before, but the second book is coming out in a few weeks, and I've been dying to sink my teeth into it for a year now. I like to get reacquainted with the first book, so when I dive into the next one, I'll be... right where I was before, forgetting nothing. :)
 

felix

Senior Member
Requiem for a Wren, by Neville Shute.

I'm also struggling through IT by King, although at 1400 pages I'm not making much headway.
 

dale

Senior Member
for lack of anything better....the tommyknockers, by king. just got my tax refund a couple days ago, though.
so i'll be hitting 1/2 price books this weekend. haven't a clue what all i'll pick out.
 

FrameOfDust

Senior Member
I just finished reading 'Till We Have Faces' by C.S.Lewis. It's a retelling of the myth of Cupid and Psyche, and it explores different forms of love and how they can be both beautiful and viscious. I would definitely suggest it.
 

Jeko

WF Veterans
Syrn by Agnie Sage, fifth book in the Septimus Heap series. Brilliant, enjoyable fantasy.
 

Bilston Blue

WF Veterans
I've just read The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes. I bought it on the strength of its winning last years Booker Prize and it didn't disappoint. In short its a first person novella with themes of time, memory, regret, and guilt wrapped up in the life story of the narrator.

I'll be reading more of Barnes' stuff. I've wanted to read his England, England for a while now.
 

ginny

Senior Member
Holy Fools by Joanne Harris......25% of the way through the book and loving every word!!! Really feeding my my ravenous imagination, a veritable bounty of "bounce off the page" characters and images. A delight, truley magical.
 

felix

Senior Member
I've just read The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes. I bought it on the strength of its winning last years Booker Prize and it didn't disappoint. In short its a first person novella with themes of time, memory, regret, and guilt wrapped up in the life story of the narrator.

I'll be reading more of Barnes' stuff. I've wanted to read his England, England for a while now.


I read that last week, I enjoyed it as well. I was surprised to see the mixed reviews on Amazon.
 

Archetype

Senior Member
Just finished Knife of Dreams by Robert Jordan. 11th book in the Wheel of Time. I've heard criticisms about the series. Some were legitimate. He does tend to go off on tangents and it can get a little dry. But I wouldn't be on to book 12 if I didn't care about the characters he's so painstakingly developed. :) And there are a lot of them.

Also reading Necroscope by Brian Lumley. It takes place during the cold war and has to do with supernatural agencies on both sides of the iron curtain. Without spoiling anything, he has interesting takes on vampires and necromancy I've never read before.
 

Chaeronia

Senior Member
Light by M John Harrison.

I really must stop reading authors who are just that little bit too dauntingly good.

Also half-way through Ready Player One by Ernest Cline. An antithesis to Harrison, but in a nice, hamburger-with-fries-after-a-week-of-fine-dining kind of way.

EDIT: Actually, having finished Ready Player One, I'm left disappointed. The second half kills the story: a plot that the writer doesn't know how to structure with any nuance (as linear as the retro gaming it espouses) and that suffers horribly from invincible protagonist syndrome; any whiff of peril is handily dealth with via a handy deus ex machina or ten.

There's little or no attempt at foreshadowing, so when an obstacle needs to be overcome, a preceding paragraph or two describing how the main character knows everything there is to know about <insert uber-geek reference> is clunkily exposited. Need to play a perfect game of Pac-Man (only ever been done a handful of times in seventy-odd years)? No problem! Give our hero a few hours - y'know, so he can get in the zone - and it's job done.

Need to re-enact every scene - with dialogue - from Monty Python and the Holy Grail to progress to the next level? Easy! Our guy here, we learn just before he has to perform this feat of savantry, has fortunately seen the film one-hundred and fifty-seven times. Honestly.

It's so brazen I have to almost give the writer credit for chutzpah.

The nostalgia, then, is revealed as distraction; a gimmick to hide an inability to formulate plot. Not good for a plot-driven narrative.

What makes it worse is the sheer amount of retro boutique he throws at you: the nostalgia becomes cloying rather than decorative, derivative rather than honorific. As a thematic tool, the hearkening back to an earlier era is entirely superficial, which, given the dystopian near-future setting in which half the world is addicted to virtual reality, is definitely an exploratory opportunity missed.

Still, never mind all that, wasn't War Games just neato!?
 
Last edited:

Users who are viewing this thread

Top