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The Problem of Health Care (1 Viewer)

Edward Picot

Senior Member
paulandpauline.jpg


At last! A layman's guide to the UK Government's healthcare reforms, explaining them in terms so simple they might have been written by a complete idiot, and charting the development of health care from the good old days to the present and beyond - with hilarious results! In fabulous stickman-o-vision, with bits of colour. Kind of a Dr Hairy spinoff, but the Dr Hairy episode it span off from hasn't been made yet.

To see it on YouTube go to The Problem of Health Care - YouTube ; or to download it from my site right-click http://drhairy.org/problemofhealthcare.mov and select "Save as..."

- Edward Picot
 

Ditch

Senior Member
Tell me it isn't so, someone from the UK is actually unhappy with socialized medicine? I was attacked on another writers forum for speaking out against Obama shoving his socialized medicine down our throats.
 

Edward Picot

Senior Member
Tell me it isn't so, someone from the UK is actually unhappy with socialized medicine? I was attacked on another writers forum for speaking out against Obama shoving his socialized medicine down our throats.

It isn't so, Ditch. I'm very pro-National Health. I work in the NHS. What I'm attacking is the Government's so-called plan for reforming the NHS, which is actually a plan for taking it apart and bringing in a lot of private medicine instead.
 

Ditch

Senior Member
It isn't so, Ditch. I'm very pro-National Health. I work in the NHS. What I'm attacking is the Government's so-called plan for reforming the NHS, which is actually a plan for taking it apart and bringing in a lot of private medicine instead.

Well is everyone there just ecstatic with it? There are no complaints from anyone?
 

The Backward OX

WF Veterans
And what is wrong with private medicine? History has proven that a government cannot run a chook raffle, as we say out here in the colonies, or a meat raffle elsewhere.

Over the past twelve months I have been caught up in the public health system merely because no one else in this country offers the facilities I needed for treatment. What I learned of the administration side of things in this time was enough to make me wonder how public health ever cures anything.
 

Ditch

Senior Member
In our country the things that government has run are broke.. Social Security, broke..Medicare, broke... Medicaid, broke... the postal service, broke..

These same thieving Bozos want to run our health care system?
 

garza

Senior Member
See the 'Thought for the Month' on the back page of the current issue of the WF Newsletter.
 

Ditch

Senior Member
See the 'Thought for the Month' on the back page of the current issue of the WF Newsletter.

I agree Garza, not detracting from the current thread but in our country right now, this administration doesn't have a clue. Or they are experts at totally wrecking an economy. Adding 16,000 IRS agents and food police does nothing to help our nation. We now return you to our regular broadcast... health care.
 

Edward Picot

Senior Member
Ditch -

In answer to your question about whether everyone in the UK is ecstatic about the NHS, I think it's got to be a "no". On the other hand, opinion polls over the years have consistently shown that the public in the UK regard the NHS as an essential part of society, almost a kind of birthright. In other words we're completely wedded to the idea that health care should be universally available and free at the point of need.

The trouble is, partly because the health service is so symbolically important to everybody, no government can ever resist the temptation to tinker with it, with the result that since I've been working in the NHS (more than twenty years now) we've had one "biggest reform in a generation" after another - I can think of at least four of them - each of which has had some good points, but each of which has also added another layer of bureaucracy and complexity to what is already a red-tape-laden edifice.

The other problem is that we have an ageing population, a population which is living longer and making more and more demands on the health service, with the result that costs are escalating all the time, and no political party is prepared to put up taxes to pay for these escalating costs, because it's perceived as political suicide. So we have all sorts of schemes to make the NHS more efficient, most of which amount to piecemeal privatisation and rationing dressed up in various deceitful ways.

The latest attempt at NHS reform is underpinned by the idea that the most expensive thing in the health service is hospital treatment. If you can keep patients out of hospital, you'll save loads of money: as soon as you send them to the hospital, costs rocket. The Government has two strategies for dealing with this. Firstly, its GPs (general practitioners/family doctors) who refer patients to the hospital, so make GPs responsible for the costs they incur, and they'll be obliged to cut the number of referrals they make. Secondly, introduce a system of "any willing provider", which means that if the optician at the end of the street thinks he can fix somebody's cataract just as well as the consultant ophthalmologist at the hospital, he should be allowed to put himself forward as a service-provider, and the GP should be allowed to refer to him instead of the hospital as a means of saving money.

These are the reforms I'm attempting to explain/satirise in my little cartoon.

- Edward
 

Ditch

Senior Member
There are no free programs as everyone knows. Doctors and nurses are required to have vast amounts of knowledge and therefore expect and are entitled to make more money than non skilled labor. Also, mistakes have high consequences so lawsuits follow every malpractice mistake. These rising costs cannot just be absorbed by any government without either raising taxes, cutting other services or denying care. I pay over $400.00 per month for my health insurance with my former employer paying at least twice, if not three times that. One main problem that we have here is that we have always had government sponsored health care in the respect that no one can be denied care. They are stabilized, then sent to a charity or learning hospital. The problem is that millions of illegal aliens know this and one with major medical problems can run the bill into over a million dollars. They can't be deported either, so what began as a big problem, got a lot bigger when Obama opened the door to "free" health care. This program is rife with non medical staff making decisions on who gets the care and when.

So, I pay for my wife and my health care out of pocket, plus deductibles and drugs while a person who isn't even a citizen or is a citizen but has never worked gets it"free" at my tax expense. History shows that people from Canada do come here and pay for procedures they need because they are forced to wait so long in line for their government sponsored health care. If you want to see any program get really screwed up, give it to the government to control.
 
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