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The King (Stephen King, that is) (1 Viewer)

Elphaba

Senior Member
I thought I'd start a thread about one of my favorite authors, Stephen King, since I couldn't find one on him around (!!). He's certainly been a big influence on my writing: not only nudging me to become a horror writer, but the best one I can be. He's one of the best painter of words I've ever read.

Personally, I'm looking forward to November 4th, when the next Dark Tower book comes out. I've already told my husband that there's nothing stopping me from buying the hardcover on the first day it's out. Yes, I'm a little fanatical.

Anyone else love to read SK? Or have been influenced by his works?
 

Darkshine

Member
It's nice to see a fellow Stephen King fan! Most people who I tell I read his books laugh at me and tell me he's a hack. I don't think that's true. I think the way you put it is right on, he paints with words.

I haven't personally read any of the Dark Towers series, but I'd definately like to one day. His horror stories are brilliant and have seriously messed with my mind. I forget what the name of his lastest short story collection was, but most of those scared the crap out of me. And Hearts in Atlantis was beautiful *note: that's where my signature comes from*. I grew up on his older stuff and still love him to this day. Now that's what I call a great writer! :D

What are your favorite books of his Elpha?
 

Elphaba

Senior Member
I wonder what the people who call SK a hack will think when they find that he's about to get a prestigious award for his contribution to American literature. The National Book Award for Distinguished Contributions to American Letters (I had to copy and paste that-- too scatterbrained to remember it all!). He certainly deserves it-- there aren't too many horror writers who've contributed more than he has!

Oh Lordy, favorite books? Well, the Dark Tower series, of course ;). I definitely recommend them-- they're different, but worth every word. I could go on and on, but I'll spare you my rambling. Others... Salem's Lot, The Green Mile, Desperation, Bag of Bones, Dreamcatcher, Night Shift... and I'm also a huge fan of The Talisman and Black House. Loved the character Jack Sawyer.

Have you read any of his Richard Bachman books? Incidentally, Hearts in Atlantis is the *only* SK book I haven't read.

I became a fan of his when I was 13, because of my dad. He'd bring the books home to read, and I got curious. I'd read them during the evening while he was at work, and he'd read during the day while I was in school. It sort of became a competition between us, to see who could finish first.

What others do you like, Darkshine?
 

Fantasia

Senior Member
Darkshine said:
It's nice to see a fellow Stephen King fan! Most people who I tell I read his books laugh at me and tell me he's a hack. I don't think that's true. I think the way you put it is right on, he paints with words.
A hack? Why would they call him that?

I used to love Stephen King, and my all-time favorite will always be Misery (Hehe, before the movie came out.) but since his ebook Riding the Bullet (liked that one too), I believe I've been remiss of paying homage to our legendary horror writer.
 

Darkshine

Member
Elpha- I haven't gotten close to reading all of his books, but I have a good many under my belt. Have you read any of his horror comics from when he was first getting started? Reeeaaalllyyy odd. I actually haven't read any of the Richard Bachman books, although I was really interested in Black House and was it...Desperation?

You should definately pick up Hearts in Atlantis (the movie is a piece of shit compared to the book), it's kinda...different, definately worth it. Very moving.

My favorite books of his...hmmm...The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, The Stand, Hearts in Atlantis, Everything's Eventual (the short story collection I mentioned), The Dead Zone, The Green Mile, Bag of Bones, oh and definately the Tommyknockers. Incidentally, I also adore the Shawshank Redemption. Excellent movie.

Fantasia- A lot of people just assume that all horror writers are showboats and sell outs, I think. It's a dangerous assumption to make. There are a lot of people who get him mixed up with other horror writers and accuse him of gratuitious violence which is definately not the case.

I also loved Misery (the book and the movie) and the ebook you mentioned had a part included in the short story collection I mentioned. I believe. What was Riding the Bullet about? A car and a guy dying, right?

On a side note, what do you guys think of Dean Koontz?
 

Jasmine

Member
My fave King book is always going to be IT. I guess because I grew up with it, watched the movie when I was 8, and loved it, so I begged my mother to buy me the book, whcih I still read, and it still scares the pants off me!

Aside from it, I really enjoyed Desperation (which was written under the name King, btw), and it's companion piece The Regulators by Richard Bachman.

I am a far cry from reading all of his books, I tend to shy away from his fantasy novels, but an absolute must read for any fan and fellow writer is definately On Writing.

Pick it up, you won't regret it.
 

Fantasia

Senior Member
The Green Mile (the movie) still reduces me to tears and I've watched it so many times already. The Shawshank Redemption (and to my husband's utter horror and disbelief) is still a movie I have not seen. ::runs and hides::

Riding the bullet, if I recall correctly, is about a hitchiking guy, a ghost and choices.
 

Elphaba

Senior Member
Darkshine-- I haven't seen any of the horror comics-- how did you get ahold of those? I think I read that some of his earliest stories are either available now, or soon going to be. I'll have to check.

I loved the Bachman books, and agree with SK's assessment that his Bachman alter ego was more twisted and dark. The Long Walk and Rage are my favorites. Black House was written with Peter Straub (another of my favorites-- Ghost Story scared the crap out of me).

I really like Dean Koontz's older work (loved Servants of Twilight), but his last few books have seemed different... like he's either become really happy or has found religion again. I don't know-- he never seemed to have such happy endings before. I do however *love* the two books about Christopher Snow, the man allergic to sunlight (can't remember the titles). I hope he writes another one about him.

I'm pretty sure Riding the Bullet's in Everything's Eventual. You know what story drove me nuts in that book? I think it was called "That Feeling, You Can Only Say it in French". I wanted to throw the damn thing across the room after all that repetition! My favorite was the title story-- Dinky Earnshaw was quite a memorable character.

The Shawshank Redemption is one of the best movies ever made. Wow. Green Mile, too. The director of those has written the script to "The Mist" (another fabulous story), but I don't think he's directing.

God, I get long-winded, don't I? :oops:
 

Darkshine

Member
Elpha- My friend's dad was a huge Stephen King fan and he had a collection of the comics in his basement. My mom was a big fan of all his early stuff, up until Cujo or Salem's Lot. Anyways, now she hates his writing. :? Now that I hear the Bachman books are more twisted, I'm gonna hafta pick those up, I love twisted! Everyone always told me they were way too long-winded.

I totally agree about Koontz. He's another one people laugh at me about. He's had some rather lame books, I can admit...like Demon Seed. lmao. Anyways, I agree about the Chris Snow books. Excellect. Especailly as an adventure story. hey just draw you in. Are those the ones that have the guy in the wheelchair with the dog? I get all his stories confused! (lol @ the finding religion comment) I think he's done that cause of accusations of being overly gorey. I know there was a lot of pressure at some point...I think.

Which story was That Feeling, You Can Only Say It In French? I think the story in there about the haunted hotel room permenately screwed my head up. I read it home alone, and freaked out. My imagination really gets carried away!

And I forgot to mention The Shining! One of my all time favs, although the Nickleson movie version was a travesty. The newer one was excellent, however. Jack was very well played, in my opinion.

Jasmine- I ment The Regulators! :oops: I have been meaning to read "On Writing" for a long time now...I've heard stellar things. :D

Who's long-winded now? :wink:
 

Elphaba

Senior Member
Darkshine-- Thanks for the heads up about Demon Seed. It *did* look lame! I can't remember the name of the worst DK book I read, but I remember getting it because I needed to be distracted during a plane ride (I hate flying). Did it help? NO! God, it was awful. Something about scientists in either the Arctic or Antarctica. You said: "I think he's done that cause of accusations of being overly gorey. I know there was a lot of pressure at some point...I think." Pressure to tone down his graphic content? Really; you'd think that someone with his amount of success wouldn't even have to deal with that crap, or that it would bother him. I never thought they were too gory... but then again, most of what I read is horror, so I'm probably immune.

"That Feeling, You Can Only Say It In French" was the one about the husband and wife who die in (either a plane or car) crash. And she keeps reliving the days leading up to the accident over and over and O-VER... SK said he thinks hell is repetition. It certainly was, reading that.

You know, the first "The Shining" movie really scared me-- I think I was nine when I saw it, and those little girls were the worst. I did like the miniseries better, especially Steven Weber. But the only thing I don't think SK is good at, when it comes to writing, is dialogue. It looks
great on the page, but translated to screen... it just doesn't sound wholly realistic to me. I love the guy, but he ought to give up on translating his works from book to screen. Just my opinion, of course.

I've read most of his books more than once, but I can't read The Dead Zone again. More than any other one, it kills me that Johnny died, and I can't read it again. Too sad.
 

frantic_scribbler

Senior Member
Awww...Stephen King. One of the most famous horror writers in American history. Countless movies have been based off his books, short stories, and novelletes. I myself own the following books of Stephen King:
Four Past Midnight
Night Shift
Everythings Eventual
From A Buick 8
The Stand
The Drawing of the Three
The Wastelands
Wizards and Glass
The Green Mile
and I think that's it. I love his writing because he writes as if he knows the supernatural personally. He has been an idol to me along with several other writers. I trully appreciate his work.
 
J

Joseph

Although they aren't all first editions, I own a hardcover copy of everything Stephen King has written from Carrie to The Wolves of Calla. Yes, I am a big fan.

I've been told that my stories read like a cross between Stephen King and Michael Crichton.
 

frantic_scribbler

Senior Member
I wish I could find all of Stephen King's books. However, I find that I only like his books when they deal with the supernatural. I could never get into Cujo.
 

Nazareth

Senior Member
Darkshine- Get the Dark tower series- You won't be able to stop until you read em all & you'll be up late reading too
 

Creative_Insanity

Senior Member
Elphaba said:
I thought I'd start a thread about one of my favorite authors, Stephen King, since I couldn't find one on him around (!!). He's certainly been a big influence on my writing: not only nudging me to become a horror writer, but the best one I can be. He's one of the best painter of words I've ever read.

Personally, I'm looking forward to November 4th, when the next Dark Tower book comes out. I've already told my husband that there's nothing stopping me from buying the hardcover on the first day it's out. Yes, I'm a little fanatical.

Anyone else love to read SK? Or have been influenced by his works?

I've only read a few of his books and short stories, but I've enjoyed them all! He is so creative with his descriptions. What an amazing writer.
 

Dragonscales

Senior Member
My gf & I own quite a large chunk of his books, I am currently reading insomnia. As for the talentless hack point, well, I think people who think that either:

1. Haven't read his stuff.

2. Are wankers.

3. A combination of the above.
 

Zassiliss

Member
Wow, you guys too? I've become a horror/science fiction writer because of him and various other authors. His writing is the best thing that happened in the history of everything. Ever.

How much do you want to bet that when he's dead, there'll be lots of books that say things like 'In the tradition of Stephen King' and stuff like that?
 

Zassiliss

Member
Let's not forget From a Buick 8. It's one of the greatest monster/secret stories out there.
I especially like the 'man' who left the Buick there, although he only appears in one page.

"oil's Fine!"
 

Creative_Insanity

Senior Member
frantic_scribbler said:
I absolutely agree with you Dragonscales. I love his work. There is no way a hack can write that way.
Anyone who calls Stephen King a "hack" obviously knows nothing about writing. I don't mind if people say they don't like his works; horror isn't everyone's thing, and of couse I respect that. But just because you don't enjoy something doesn't mean the writer is "bad". What it means is that your interests and his interests don't collide -- nothing more, nothing less. Gauging your enjoyment of a book and gauging the author's talent are two entirely different things. I've read plenty of books that I didn't like but still greatly respect because of the complexity of the writing. Anyways, back to Stephen King. . . he is a great writer. It takes a whole lot of talent to think up the creative sorts of descriptions he gives.
 
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