Writing Forums

Writing Forums is a privately-owned, community managed writing environment. We provide an unlimited opportunity for writers and poets of all abilities, to share their work and communicate with other writers and creative artists. We offer an experience that is safe, welcoming and friendly, regardless of your level of participation, knowledge or skill. There are several opportunities for writers to exchange tips, engage in discussions about techniques, and grow in your craft. You can also participate in forum competitions that are exciting and helpful in building your skill level. There's so much more for you to explore!

The Inheritance Series (Eragon, Eldest) vs. The Harry Potter series (1 Viewer)

BeautifulDisaster

Senior Member
Which series is better? The Inheritance Series by Christopher Paolini or the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling? Why?

I like them both equally for different reasons. Although I'm just beginning to read Eldest.

The Harry Potter series is amazing. I love the magical world J.K. Rowling's created, how she describes it and the characters she creates. I think the main reason I love her books is because she created a secret world living in the real world, unbeknownst to most muggles.

The Inheritance Series is also equally amazing. I love the fact that dragons can read their riders thoughts. That's the only reason I can think of right now.

I don't read fantasy too often, but I'll make an exception for those books.

Are there any other great fantasy books out there (I've tried reading Lord of the Rings.. but I couldn't)?
 

Omnisu

Senior Member
Try the Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan. Or The Song of Ice and Fire series by George R. R. Martin. Or The Kingdom of Thorn and Bone series by Greg Keyes. Those are my three current 'open' series (That is; I'm eagerly awaiting the next book in each of them).

I bought Eragorn because the author was sixteen when he wrote it. For encouragment, I supose. It's served that purpose well. I was unable to finish the book because the quality is so inconsistent. You can tell the author re-wrote the beginning after he finished the first draft, but it doesn't seem like he touched the middle much. It also followed the 'fantasy formula' right to the letter. Young coming of age hero, cliche european dragons, old guide character. All it needed was a princess disquised as a begger. I wouldn't be surprised if it did have one somewhere after I stopped reading. I doubt I'll bother to try the series again. I hope the author suceeds, of course. I might try his next series.
I'm trying to find a nice way to say it's crap, but I can't. That's why it's such great encouragment. Theres a lot of published stuff that's utter crap - but crap on the new york times bestseller list is a special breed of crap. Comparing my writing to that book invariably makes me feel better.
 

Omnisu

Senior Member
BTW; if you want to read about dragons reading their rider's minds, go get some McCaffery.
 

BeautifulDisaster

Senior Member
Hmm.. okay, thanks for the new (to me anyway) authors. I'll have to read McCaffery's, Jordan, Keyes, or Martin's book(s) sometimes. I'm looking for a new author to read.

I didn't realize that Paolini was only 16 when he wrote that!

You're right... a princess (I think) appears suddenly at the end. I did NOT like the ending, and I didn't like how the author wrote her into the novel. But, of course, she IS a significant character in the next book.

I do see what you mean-it was probably my first fantasy novel after reading Harry Potter.

And Eldest, the sequel.. I don't see how I'm going to finish the novel. It moves so slowly and quite frankly, not that believable.
 
Last edited:
C

Charis

While I have read both series through I can say I do like Harry Potter better, not because I have some rabid fan following, but because I can get closer to the characters. In Eldest, for some reason, it seems as if the characters are far away, above us in some sort of strange way. His writing becomes irratating when you realize it delves more and more into the conventional stereotypes. While the story is amazing, and definately one of my favorite series, I find the characters hard to connect with and the story hard to truly understand.
 

Omnisu

Senior Member
You mean http://www.writingforums.com/showthread.php?t=42433 this one?

In my defense, I bought the book at cosco. I needed to buy atleast two books to get this 50% discount. Eragorn cost $15. They had the complete works of Shakespeare in a leather bound box set for $80. You can tell what happened.

I'll have to read... Jordan ... book(s) sometimes.
Actually, a bit of warning there. There are 11 of them now, with the 12th and I hope to god last coming soon. Be prepared to be pissed to discover your library hasn't got a copy of the fourth one in right after you were up all night reading the third...
 
Last edited:

BeautifulDisaster

Senior Member
Hmm..thanks for that. I'm reading the posts now. I can't get into "Eldest" anymore, and I think I'm gonna stop reading it. The plot just isn't really interesting to me.
 

MarkINR

Senior Member
The inheritance series is the biggest mountain of polluted rabbit dung to hit literature since the conception of the romance novel. Christopher Paolini is without a doubt the worst published author I have ever had the displeasure of hearing about or reading from.

To prove my point, let me read you an excerpt from Page 1 of Eldest:


"Eragon ran a hand over his face and looked up at the stars, which were smudged with sooty smoke from the pyre. Three days. The days since he had killed Durza; three days since people began calling him Shadeslayer; three days since the remnants of the sorcerors consciousness had ravaged his mind and he had been saved by the mysterious Togira Ikonoka, the Cripple Who Is Whole."


Not to mention the style of speech is indentical with all the characters and completely unrealistic and artificial to boot.


Burn in the pit, inheritance.



P.S. Did I mention it plagiarizes Starwars almost event for event?
 
Last edited:

Omnisu

Senior Member
Star Wars? Really? Which episode? I didn't notice that much; but then again the mysterious guide + destroyed home thing was cliche before Lucas did it.

This just goes to prove my point. If it can be published, then I can shit on the page and sell it - with a little marketing.
 

Omnisu

Senior Member
Hahah! Come to think of it, that's very nearly the plot of one of the threads in MY novel too. With the slight difference that the protagonist with the mysterious guide isn't the same one who's home is destroyed. And the parents live...
 

Anarkos

Senior Member
Omnisu said:
Hahah! Come to think of it, that's very nearly the plot of one of the threads in MY novel too. With the slight difference that the protagonist with the mysterious guide isn't the same one who's home is destroyed. And the parents live...

Is it still cliche if the protagonist is the one who destroyed his/her home...and has no remorse?
 

Omnisu

Senior Member
Everything is cliche if you abstract it enough.

OMG, my story has people in it! That's so cliche!

[edit]Wait, was that the plot in Eragorn? Maybe Poilini was trying to tell his parents something?[/edit]
 

Blossom

Senior Member
Eragon is a typical fantasy storyline, with little originality in it. I think Paolini has potential with his writing, but he really needs to start thinking outside of the box. I think he books are for those days when you want to read but can't be bothered to concentrate on the plot.

Harry Potter is more original, but still somewhat cliched. Don't get me wrong, I'm a huge HP fan, but somehow I doubt the ending of book 7 will be that surprising. And whoever said about connecting with the characters more in HP, I completely agree.

However, my favourite fantasy author has to be Jennifer Fallon, though Chris Wooding comes in close second.
Robert Jordan is also good, but the books are so long! I'm in the middle of #4, and can't be bothered to read the rest of it :p
 

Anarkos

Senior Member
Omnisu said:
[edit]Wait, was that the plot in Eragorn? Maybe Poilini was trying to tell his parents something?[/edit]

Sadly, no. I just firmly believe that this world needs more psychopathic protagonists.
 

Crazy_dude6662

Senior Member
BeautifulDisaster said:
Hmm.. okay, thanks for the new (to me anyway) authors. I'll have to read McCaffery's, Jordan, Keyes, or Martin's book(s) sometimes. I'm looking for a new author to read.

I didn't realize that Paolini was only 16 when he wrote that!

You're right... a princess (I think) appears suddenly at the end. I did NOT like the ending, and I didn't like how the author wrote her into the novel. But, of course, she IS a significant character in the next book.

I do see what you mean-it was probably my first fantasy novel after reading Harry Potter.

And Eldest, the sequel.. I don't see how I'm going to finish the novel. It moves so slowly and quite frankly, not that believable.

well he started at 15/16, ended around 19/20. also age shouldnt be a factor in deiciding if somthing is good.
 

Kane

Senior Member
Perhaps not, but it is very rare that a 16 year old can understand the emotions and motivations of an adult. This factors very heavily into writing a good story, because well-developed characters are essential, moreso than anything else.
 
Top