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The Harry Potter Mania (1 Viewer)

Lily

Senior Member
Okay. So what is it about these 5 books that have caused a world-wide craze? I've read all of them and love all of them, but for some reason, I just can't put a finger on what makes them so widely loved. What do you think is the reason? Or, if you don't like them, why don't you like them?

I like the Harry Potter books mostly because they're a refreshing read after all the dense classic stuff that other people call 'intellectual books' I'm usually reading. Another reason I find myself liking them is that, while they're much lighter reads than say, Byatt, or Dickens or Tolstoy, they're still fast-paced and the characters are pretty vivid- they're not at all the empty stuff that I find most of my classmates enjoy reading. I can associate with almost all the characters in the book in at least some form or the other, and it's not hard to believe that the Wizarding World actually exists.

I think people are so fascinated with the books because they provide an escape from reality. That is, they provide a, for the most part, believable escape from reality, and these days, that seems to be what society is thirsting for.

That's about it for me. What do you think?
 
D

Davin

In all matters of reason, you are correct. Most people need some sort of escape. Most people loose themselves in television. Sadly, that is why most people think life should be like a TV show. I myself enjoy cartoons. While they do help you obtain a certain escape from reality, You also know that it is not real. At least I hope they think it is real. Books are my first love though. I have never been to long with out a book. Reading makes your mind expand in ways a TV show never can. But cartoons are a rather good diversion.
 

Caria

Member
anyone remember the last craze like this over books for young
readers?

I can't. ( not that it says much (I am only 22) )

I think that may be why they are so popular.

I remember reading the box car kids, babysitting club ( or something like that ) books ...etc.

Also the fact that anyone can enjoy them from elemantary age thru adulthood.
 

AdamR

Senior Member
They are well writtin, well-plotted, and plain fun. It's something that causes youngsters to start to enjoy reading, and it's a very good thing. Like you said, they are fast paced. Yet, they are not too fast that the much needed descriptive writing is lost in between events. Don't compare the books to Tolstoy or Tolkein, because you really can't find higher examples of description and plot.

I think another reason they are so popular is that both youngsters, teens, and even adults can enjoy the series. Not many books can claim that ability. Let's take Tolstoy for example, War and Peace is much too advanced for the average 9 or 10 year old to read. Yet, The Boxcar Children (an example) is too "under-written" for, say, a college student or adult. J.K. Rowling has written the series in a way that it can be understood, enjoyed, and appriciated by most all ages.
 

hollyoake

Senior Member
well i am twenty-two now and i still like reading Roald Dahl, they both have the 'magic' of being able to keep the audiance whether they are young or old.
 

Elphaba

Senior Member
Yes, but even Roald Dahl's books weren't the phenom that HP is. And I'm a big Dahl fan, too.

I think you nailed it, Lily-- it's escapism, it's fun, and it's believable. However, as a parent, I'm adding in my gratitude for the series, because my older daughter hated reading for pleasure before then. As soon as she finished the first book, though, she was off like a rocket, and reads every single day now. I've read dozens of quotes from other parents who've said that about their kids. So, not only did JK Rowling create a wonderfully imaginative world, she also created a love of reading in a lot of kids who otherwise hadn't cared.

I'm a little envious of her imagination. I can't believe all the great stuff, details she comes up with.
 

hollyoake

Senior Member
Elphaba said:
Yes, but even Roald Dahl's books weren't the phenom that HP is. And I'm a big Dahl fan, too.


do you really think that?
i found that i couldn't re-read and Potter books as soon as i have finished them, but The Twits, and Matilda... i can't get enough of them!
 

Elphaba

Senior Member
Yes, I really think that.

I'm talking about the hoopla and coverage surrounding the HP books. And just like Dahl, I believe they have staying power, too.
 

hollyoake

Senior Member
there is one thing that worked better for Potter then it did/has for anything that came out of Roald's head, and that is the film productions of his books. i don't know about anyone else but i thought the film version of Matilda stank!

but i adored the animated BFG!

(some people just don't grow up do they?)
 

Elphaba

Senior Member
Oh, for God's sake, I keep hitting the "Post New Topic" button and then having to go back after typing! :roll:

Talking about movie adaptations reminded me that Tim Burton is remaking "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory". Johnny Depp is playing Willy. I don't know how it'll work out. He's fantastic, and he was able to pull off playing Ichabod Crane, but... I read that he's nervous about doing it because Gene Wilder is so famous for it, and that might work against him. Just don't know!

Back ot, Yah, yah, the HP movies are really good. I'm also a little iffy about the third one, though... don't know if/how much it might stray away from the book.
 

Lily

Senior Member
I actually think the third one will be better than the others from what I've seen of it. The only problem I have is that apparently, hormones play a much larger role in this movie, and also, the kids don't wear wizard clothes half as often as they should. I was always under the impression that black robes were the uniform of Hogwarts, so why would they be wearing Muggle clothes?

As for the mania, yeah, I think the movies really did spice it up too. I never thought of that before, but now that I am thinking of it, it makes sense, even though the movies, in my opinion, were all fairly disappointing in some way or the other, though the acting was mostly pretty good.

I was also under the impression that the Roald Dahl books were never nearly as popular as the Harry Potter books, but that may just be me . . .
 

Farror

WF Veterans
I think that the Harry Potter books are so popular because the conept of a school for learning magic is such a good one, combined with the vived characters and setting of Hogwarts makes a truly addictive series of books. I know that many people, myself included enjoy this book because of the way Rowling writes and descrbes everything makes it seem so vivid and real that you could almost believe it was real. The magical items, the spells, the uniformes, everything!

As for the third movie, I have not heard much about it. I would find it odd if they wore muggle clothes much in the third because in the other two the robes seemed to be what the students usually wore. Maybe the muggle clothes are from the begining of the book, before Harry goes to school. You know, during his stay in diagon alley?

So anyways, that's my opinion of the matter...
 

AdamR

Senior Member
I know that in the book, there was a considerable more amount of time spend outside of the school (in the Muggle world) than in the previous two. This could be the cause of that.

There's a new trailer for the third movie out just recently, you can view it at www.movies.com

Just search for "Harry Potter" and it'll come up with the resulst for it, from there you can select "Trailers & Clips"
 

Elphaba

Senior Member
I can't get it to play... just keeps playing an ad.

I saw a trailer a few weeks ago... and my older daughter plays it repeatedly. It's actually a really good trailer, with the choir, and that Ray Bradbury nod... but after hearing it constantly, I want to disconnect the speakers from the computer. Is that the one that I can't play?

My concerns were with the "hipper" Muggle clothes that I've seen in the pictures, but since that's almost *all* of what I've seen, maybe that's all they're showing. Do I make sense? So maybe my concerns are unfounded.
 

AdamR

Senior Member
Elphaba said:
I can't get it to play... just keeps playing an ad.
It's actually a really good trailer, with the choir, and that Ray Bradbury nod... but after hearing it constantly, I want to disconnect the speakers from the computer. Is that the one that I can't play?

Yes, that's the one. After the ad plays, it is supposed to refresh and play the trailer, guess it didn't work for you. But you've already see it, so...
 

Guineapiggy

Senior Member
As fond as my memories are of books I read as a child that's what this is, a child's book. Sure, fine to read it once out of curiosity but there is an adult audience for this book that haven't even touched a propper adult novel in their lives, and that's just damn shameful!
 

AdamR

Senior Member
It is shameful, and hopefully they will push those immature 'adults' into the wonderful experience called reading.
 

safari invasion

Senior Member
I think that the Harry Potter books do a fine job of getting kids interested in reading. It is refreshing to see elementary-aged people standing in line to purchase a 700-page book. I like to see that.
I read the first three books. I can see why people like them, though it really isn't my thing. The writing is good and the characters are interesting, but it's something I have trouble getting into.
 

Nazareth

Senior Member
Is it "magic" they are learning in the book? or is it "witchcraft"? If Witchcraft, then I find that a bit troubling especially for children- But that';s another topic.

I never read much as a kid, however, the books I did read were not fantasy based & just never was my books of choice-
 

Fantasia

Senior Member
safari invasion said:
I think that the Harry Potter books do a fine job of getting kids interested in reading. It is refreshing to see elementary-aged people standing in line to purchase a 700-page book. I like to see that.
I remember this is the main reason that Harry Potter has caused this much mania. JK Rowling got kids to read a *novel*, and that's no small feat. After that, everyone just jumped into the band wagon, critisizing it, loving it, hating it, calling it an evil book or a book about good winning over evil...

With that said, I think HP has done more good for a lot of kids/people than any book has. Remember... all it takes is just one book to be read all the way through and enjoyed for a kid to get hooked on reading for life. I know people who couldn't see themselves reading through an entire book to save their lives, and these people are in their mid twenties. Awful, really. They don't know what they're missing.

Many have dissed HP for being too black and white, they say, or too predictable, or too shallow... I usually say, "Hey, it was written for nine year olds! Of course it's black and white!" But the truth is, I feel that they are well-crafted stories (however rushed the fifth book felt after I've read it... oh well, that's another discussion! Ultimately, I still liked the fifth book!) that have defied imaginations worldwide. I think that's a good thing because these days, I find it refreshing when a book surprises me without having to give me a shock. Besides, I've always thought that writing for children, whatever the format, is noble.

Anyway, looking forward to the third movie. ^_^ The soundtrack sounds lovely.
 
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