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The Da Vinci Code - What did you think? (1 Viewer)

What did you think of The Da Vinci Code?

  • GREAT book. Well written, packed with interesting facts and fascinating history.

    Votes: 21 32.8%
  • It was pretty good, well written, but it wasn't anything too special.

    Votes: 22 34.4%
  • I found it offensive due to my religion.

    Votes: 3 4.7%
  • Downright boring.

    Votes: 21 32.8%

  • Total voters
    64

krazyklassykat

Senior Member
:5stars:
I REALLY liked it. But, it was bound to offend someone, and invoke a lot of different emotions in people. What did you think?
 

blademasterzzz

Senior Member
It didn't offend me because of any religious issues.

It offended me because the author was a downright idiot who couldn't get a single fact right, who wrote the worst characters I've ever read and seemed to have used almost every cliche imaginable, as well as written the cheesiest dialogue I've seen to this day along with utter contempt for the reader's intelligence.
 

Rob

Senior Member
I heard it on audio CD, as I tend to travel quite a lot on business. I enjoyed it.
 

blademasterzzz

Senior Member
I suppose it is enjoyable on the lowest level, but it certainly isn't anything special, other than the fact that it was written to appeal to less gifted individuals.
 

krazyklassykat

Senior Member
It offended me because the author was a downright idiot who couldn't get a single fact right, who wrote the worst characters I've ever read and seemed to have used almost every cliché imaginable, as well as written the cheesiest dialogue I've seen to this day along with utter contempt for the reader's intelligence.

I would have expected nothing more from you, blademasterz. Do you really ENJOY expressing yourself so violently? YOU'RE the offending one. And as for getting facts straight, it WAS a novel you know. Did it ever occur to you that maybe it was meant to invoke thoughts, instead of criticism?? Look, I don't know what kind of writer has to resort to such awful use of language to express himself, but it certainly isn't an "adept" one. People would probably respect your opinions more if you presented them in a mature manner. If you're incapable of that, you really shouldn't be on a writing forum.
Because it's not about grammar and semantics and all that! It's the ideas that lie beneath, that's what writing is about. If you want to be so nasty, you should be a CRITIC, not a writer.
 

Cady

Senior Member
Eh, it was ok... Very overated. I cant say too much because he was published, I havent been...yet :)
 

Selorian

Patron
As far as excellent writing, it leaves a lot to be desired. I have seen many writers who can do better, but it was well enough done to be published, so that says something.

As far as story is concerned, I think he did a good job of tying things together to make them plausible. It makes a person want to stop and wonder at times. As I like that sort of thing anyway, it appealed to me more than it possibly does to others though. To each his own. Suppose that makes me one of the less gifted individuals, eh?

The story moved along and drew the reader in, making them have to read more. In that he succeeded. That is what writing and storytelling is about at the simplest level. If you don't make the reader want to continue, it doesn't matter how well you write, the book will be put down.

Just my two cents, but kudos to him for creating a bestseller. That is something all writers probably strive for.
 
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blademasterzzz

Senior Member
would have expected nothing more from you, blademasterz. Do you really ENJOY expressing yourself so violently? YOU'RE the offending one. And as for getting facts straight, it WAS a novel you know. Did it ever occur to you that maybe it was meant to invoke thoughts, instead of criticism?? Look, I don't know what kind of writer has to resort to such awful use of language to express himself, but it certainly isn't an "adept" one. People would probably respect your opinions more if you presented them in a mature manner. If you're incapable of that, you really shouldn't be on a writing forum.
Because it's not about grammar and semantics and all that! It's the ideas that lie beneath, that's what writing is about. If you want to be so nasty, you should be a CRITIC, not a writer.

Alright, no need to get angry.

Look, the Da Vinci Code is a horse beaten to death, and I simply summed up what was already said over and over and over and over in other threads.

I am prefectly capable of writing extensive reviews on awful literature, it's not my fault you can't take your time to search the forum. How can you tell what my posts are like, anyway? I've been here two years. How long have you been here, a month?

I don't post hateful posts unless in very rare instances. In one instance I simply had a crappy day, and the "lol" guy got to me. I spend half the day arguing with an illiterate teenager who was the most arrogant kid I've ever seen, and he "lol" ed on every page an official project. The fact that I had to work with him didn't make it any better.

I think the DaVinci code IS a dumb book, it's my honest opinion. I simply didn't like it because the author is was pretentious, because the style was VERY formulaic, and so was the story. I found it predictable. The characters just weren't interesting, had no depth. The whole book was such a dissapointment, I was horrified by how everyone I knew raved about it. That's why I was harsh on it.

I saw no real message, just a cheap way to make a buck. Which is ultimately why I snapped. The author has no love for literature or writing, he just sees it as a way to make money.

Okay? Can we have peace now, please?
 
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bobothegoat

Senior Member
krazyklassykat said:
I would have expected nothing more from you, blademasterz. Do you really ENJOY expressing yourself so violently? YOU'RE the offending one. And as for getting facts straight, it WAS a novel you know. Did it ever occur to you that maybe it was meant to invoke thoughts, instead of criticism?? Look, I don't know what kind of writer has to resort to such awful use of language to express himself, but it certainly isn't an "adept" one. People would probably respect your opinions more if you presented them in a mature manner. If you're incapable of that, you really shouldn't be on a writing forum.
Because it's not about grammar and semantics and all that! It's the ideas that lie beneath, that's what writing is about. If you want to be so nasty, you should be a CRITIC, not a writer.

Ironic that you are really doing the exact same thing as you're accusing Blademasterzzz of doing. Of course, Blademasterzzz was displaying an opinion of the book while you were presenting an opinion on him. It really just makes your position look that much weaker. I'd suggest you argue the merits of the book rather than those of whom you disagree with.

That said, I've never read the whole thing. I did read the prolouge once but thought the writing was terrible, so I shied away from it.
 

jk7070436

Senior Member
I didn't like it much. It wasn't my type of read. It was rather boring, I had to force myself to read it. And I didn't like that Langdon fellow, nor that woman he was with. I forgot her name, something like Sophie. Anyways, that's all I have to say. It was boring and the characters were unlikable. The chapters were incredibly short(not necessarily a bad thing).
 

Stewart

Senior Member
Personally, I'm offended by the poll options on display. The poll option about religion is ridiculous.

I found the book dull and the author to be a talentless rookie who got lucky. Based on other books edited by Kaufman - who seems to have no literary standards or knowledge and is culturally inept - I'd say Brown's success with The Da Vinci Code (the title itself a shocking misnomer!) is a product of both heavy financial backing and an audience of dumbed down non-readers who now think they are smart because they have read a book.

krazyklassykat said:
As for getting facts straight, it WAS a novel you know. Did it ever occur to you that maybe it was meant to invoke thoughts, instead of criticism?

Oh krazyklassykat, don't you get it? I'm sure there would have been little fuss with this literary turdlet if it did not contain an opening disclaimer. The fact that Dan Brown has stated things in the book are as they are in real life - and continues to do so in speeches and rare interviews (from the early days) - has opened his work up for investigation and that investigation has found it to be, in almost all cases, either inept, implausible, confused, supposed, or completely fictional. If a low-fat food said it had 1g of fat on its ingredients and it actually contained 10g of fat then that would be a candidate for investigation. When an author asserts that he has done research and backs it up then he has opened himself up for criticism, which brings me to your second question...

...The book was not meant to invoke thoughts. It's a (cheap ass) thriller and it's purpose is to provide a plot, a means of getting from A to B and to excite the reader. If you think there's any sort of religious agenda at play here then you are, like Mr Brown's research, confused. The religious aspect of this book is nothing more than a vehicle for the plot. There is no real theme to the book, it challenges no religious conceps; in fact, the plot - for what it is - is the theme! The religion is Brown's way of getting from A to B. Anyway, regarding your point about the book not being written for criticism: no writer wants criticism (once the work is in print) but who do you think the people who write the dissected quotes on books are? Oh, yeah! Critics!


I don't know what kind of writer has to resort to such awful use of language to express himself, but it certainly isn't an "adept" one.

Well, with Dan Brown as an example, you are correct in that assumption. ;)

Because it's not about grammar and semantics and all that! It's the ideas that lie beneath, that's what writing is about.

Well, I ask what you are doing on a writing forum if you care so little for grammar and semantics? As a fan of contemporary literature I would hope the authors I read - and indeed, those in print that I don't or haven't read - have an understanding of literary form and the language in which they choose to express that. Otherwise, we'd be getting Charles Dickens written in chatroom parlance:

CharlesDickens69 said:
CharlesDickens69 has entered the room.
xxxBookMasterxxx: hey chuck
CharlesDickens69: this iz da l8est from ma new bk, da xmas carl
ChickLitDiva: kewl, lets c it!!!!!!
CharlesDickens69: Marli woz ded: 2 begin wit. der iz no dowt woteva bout dat da regista ov hz burial woz sined y da clergyman, da clark, da utakr, n da cheef morner. $crooge sined it: n $crooges name woz gd pon 'Change, 4 nefing he chose 2 put hs hand 2. Old Marli woz as ded as a door-nail.
ChickLitDiva: %$£!ing gr8 chuck, got ne mo?????
xxxBookMasterxxx: w00t
Oliver4534560932: gr8!!!!!!!!!
BookerGuy has left the room.
CharlesDickens69: brb
HOTGUY4545: hey charlesdickens69, a/s/l?????

I do note, however, that krazyklassykat is fifteen and, as such, won't have a great deal of reading behind her so, starting at the bottom of the pile is a good way to appreciate how bad The Da Vinci Code is after reading anything else.

Anyway, my review, which I can't be bothered to find at the moment and shall thus replicate here, illustrates my overall thoughts on the book:

Connor Wolf said:
The success of The Da Vinci Code is certainly a literary anomaly. Both unexpected and unexplainable, the sheer volume of sales is surprising as the book is not, in my opinion, well written, intelligent, or original.

It begins in Le Louvre, Paris, with some of the clumsiest writing I've ever seen. Classics such as describing the eyes and hair colour of a silhouette are par for the course here as a museum curator of considerable renown (and how many curators have you heard of?) is murdered. From there, enter our cardboard hero, Robert Langdon, who will solve the mystery armed only with a similarly cardboard French girl and the author's help. Off he goes solving puzzles you and I solved pages ago (sometimes even chapters) despite us laymen not being schooled in his esoteric field. Throw in a couple of lame baddies, a historical secret, and the 'thrill' of the chase and you have The Da Vinci Code - a children's novel marketed at adults.

The book is fast paced, its 500 plus pages are quickly digested, although this is because the author writes such short chapters that there's a lot of blank space when one chapter ends a few lines into the page. Throughout, it uses one plot device: the cliffhanger. Fair enough, it gets you reading through the book but the author could have used more literary tactics in order to develop his story.

There are a number of places, however, where the book falls down: the writing, the characters, and the history. At times, it seems, Brown has raided a factbook of dubious authenticity and tried to cram as much of its content into his book without even deliberating over its relevance to the story at hand.

Firstly, the writing: It's simple and unemotional. There are many clumsy instances where the author says something which is simply not possible (see the silhouette comments above) or jars i.e. 'Silas prayed for a miracle and little did he know that in two hours he would get one'. You are left wondering if the author is, in parallel to the dubious facts, trying to squeeze in as much content as possible from his Little Book of Bad Cliches.

The characters, despite travelling with them for the duration of the book, never developed. They 'ooh-ed and ah-ed' their way through the startling revelations and that's about it. Their dialogue was intolerable, at times, and there were occasions when you just couldn't believe what was coming out of their mouths: Englishman saying 'soccer', French girl saying 'spring break'. It's Americanism after Americanism with these people despite only one character being American; surely, if you do as much research as Dan Brown claims to have done, you would find out how your characters speak. Another ‘joy’ is the utter shock on one character's face - who has just been told a stream of pseudo-history wher she hardly flinched- as she learns that 'rose' is an anagram of 'Eros'.

It's the facts, however, that really let this book down. It claims from the start that a number of things (such as art, documents, locations) are accurate which, with the author's supposed research, you hope to believe. And then you are inundated with Paris the wrong way around, the wrong police forces running about, French cops commanding the British cops, England being the only country in Europe where they drive on the left (conveniently forgetting Scotland, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Wales, Cyprus, and Malta), and other such nonsense as British knights carrying ID cards which pronounce them above the law.

That's the errors but, as I've said before, there are times when you feel the author is just including stuff to pad the book. Common sentences are 'Robert Langdon was surprised how many people didn't actually know...this or that' or 'Robert Langdon often smiled when he thought about how few people knew...this or that'. Place descriptions don't fare much better, unfortunately, as they are out of the story's context and read like 'copy and pastes' from tourist websites.

All in all, I've found the book to be like marmite; there are those that love it and those that hate it. I proudly place myself in the latter camp.

The pace, I enjoyed. The book, I didn't. Foucault's Pendulum by Umberto Eco covered this topic back in the 1980s - it's nothing new. Brown is just recycling the poor 'The Holy Blood & The Holy Grail' as fiction. Bad history meets bad fiction - it's a marriage made in Heaven.

If you want some no-brain beach reading - and haven't read this yet - then give it a try; it's airport tat! Don't, however, believe a word of it, as it is, for the most part, nonsense. If, however, you are looking for a great novel that deals with similar topics, and has a great reread potential, then read the aforementioned Foucault's Pendulum - it's superior in every way.
 
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teflon

Senior Member
We have discussed the topic here already. The majority thought the book and movie was made to dazzle those who knew zilch about history and religion. A mediocre detective fiction. The movie, an episode of TJ Hooker.
 

krazyklassykat

Senior Member
. . .It would take forever to reply individually to all the accusations I now have against me. Well, I'm off to a great start here.... All I can say is that (in regards to one of bobothegoat's comments), in my little outburst towards blademasterzzz, it was no longer about the book. This just happened to be the second time I'd been put off in the middle of a thread by a not-so-lovely comment by blademasterzzz. I'm an open-minded person, and if someone just says "I just didn't like the book." and states their reasoning (or even doesn't) I'd be just fine with that. But the way blademasterzzz stated his case was so aggressive and insulting, I found it very disrespectful, considering that he already knew that I liked the book.
That said, compared to the standards of many people here, I guess I'm easy to please. I have read ONE book that I distinctly remember not liking. No wait, two. The Witch of Blackbird Pond, and Ethan Frome. But oh well. Peace, peace is fine by me. Sorry for the outburst, blademasterzzz.

Oh, and Connor Wolf, believe it or not, I know far too many people who would have been offended by The Da Vinci Code due to religion. If I am to assume that very few of them visit this board, then I am immensely relieved. I just thought I'd leave that option open.

Maybe I ought to change the subject now, though, seeing how few people liked The Da Vinci Code.

Just one last comment, I really hope I haven't made a bad impression so soon, because I really enjoy being part of something more sophisticated than your average forum.
 

Stewart

Senior Member
krazyklassykat said:
I really hope I haven't made a bad impression so soon, because I really enjoy being part of something more sophisticated than your average forum.

I shouldn't have thought so. People can argue passionately in different directions. ;)
 

Ruben

Senior Member
teflon said:
We have discussed the topic here already. The majority thought the book and movie was made to dazzle those who knew zilch about history and religion. A mediocre detective fiction. The movie, an episode of TJ Hooker.

http://www.apple.com/trailers/sony_pictures/da_vinci_code/large.html

Oh... Dear... Jezus... Christ... Of... God...

*tries to burn trailer*

BTW: A congrats toward Connor for her(or his?) humongous post of justice :D
 
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