Writing Forums

Writing Forums is a privately-owned, community managed writing environment. We provide an unlimited opportunity for writers and poets of all abilities, to share their work and communicate with other writers and creative artists. We offer an experience that is safe, welcoming and friendly, regardless of your level of participation, knowledge or skill. There are several opportunities for writers to exchange tips, engage in discussions about techniques, and grow in your craft. You can also participate in forum competitions that are exciting and helpful in building your skill level. There's so much more for you to explore!

The Bible (2 Viewers)

Creative_Insanity

Senior Member
MisterRaziel said:
Sort of. But only slightly. I've seen quotes and biblical material used to great effect in stories, but it always seems like a bit of a sucker punch.

I've never been a fan of cheap measures. It's necessary to quote in a scholarly paper, but when I'm writing a story, I tend to avoid using other people's words to tell my tale.

There are very effective ways to use Bible quotes. I just read a great example yesterday. This is the opening paragraph for Joseph Finder's book, Paranoia:

Until the whole thing happened, I never believed the old line about how you should be careful what you wish for, because you might get it.

I believe it now.

I believe in all those cautionary proverbs now. I believe that pride goeth before a fall. I believe the apple doesn't fall far from the tree, that misfortune seldom comes alone, that all that glitters isn't gold, that lies walk on short legs. Man, you name it, I believe it.


Okay, so only one of those proverbs was from the Bible, but it WAS from the Bible. And I would say that it was very effective.

There are a lot of quotes from the Bible that people use every day, like "love your neighbor as yourself" or "pride comes before a fall", that many people don't even realize are from the Bible. But they will recognize them as common sayings.
 

Emma LB

Senior Member
I think it is also very important to understand the christian religion. Most of us here on this site live in a Christian country, influenced by this religion more than some people might want to accept. It's best to know where the ideas in our culture come from, that way it's easier to look at them from a new perspective and evaluate them.
I read it a long time ago, I hardly remember much of it (I read it in ancient Greek, so yeah, I didn't understand much in the first place). I think another thing after the bible you should read is some of Augustinus' works, as if people like he had not been around, then Christianity today would be very different or not exist at all. He was very important... Thomas of Aquin was too, but he was later of course
 
N

Nightowl10175

I believe every word of the bible. It is also a great read! It is one of the most complex peices of literature every written and respected in its ways. It also tells the most amazing love stories of all time. It is truley an amazing book. (Not to mention the word of God!)
 

lisajane

Senior Member
I went to a Catholic school for thirteen years... and never read the bible. I don't think I even have one.
 

Rajie

Senior Member
I went to Catholic school for a week and I don't think I ever really "read" the Bible (prolly b/c the “religious” spokespersons at any school I went to were all hypocrites, if you know what I mean) unless "ordered" to read a passage or worse, memorize a passage by a teacher. Granted it was all New Testament. Strange though, I am a Christian (a Catholic one at that) and when I write my subconscious "Catholic-ness" tends to bleed out onto my work.

But even though I am not devout I’ll admit that I absolutely hate it when people bash my faith. Although I also hate it when ignorant Christians bash the Wiccan beliefs as well (and I’m a far cry from a Witch). I guess in other words, someone who feels the need to bash another person’s faith is fairly ignorant, and ignorance to me is intolerable (on most days)..
 

LiberalDem

Senior Member
The thing that gets me about the bible is this: There are different versions. If the bible is the Word of God, how can there be different versions? I am a Catholic, and although I don't attend mass as much as I'd like, I'd like to think I'm pretty devout. Not to the point of blindness. Is the bible a good story? Yes. Do I belive Jesus Christ was the son of God, born of the Virgin Mary? Yes. Do I believe every word written in it? No.

And that's all I have to say 'bout that. :D
 

Rajie

Senior Member
LiberalDem said:
The thing that gets me about the bible is this: There are different versions. If the bible is the Word of God, how can there be different versions?

Well, King James basically "edited" the Bible (he took out a few books, but kept most of the rest in tact), and most of the Protestants follow it . The NIV is just written in a more "modern day" language. So it's all the same book just either the text is modernized (NIV), or some King didn't like the way the Catholics compiled it and "edited" it, himself.
 

LiberalDem

Senior Member
Well, King James basically "edited" the Bible (he took out a few books, but kept most of the rest in tact), and most of the Protestants follow it .

So, wouldn't it stand to reason that before King James got to the bible, someone else edited it? I guess the reason I find believing so complicitly in the bible dangerous is that it was written by men, who are by their very nature, fallible. I think the bible (The New Testament) is a great "guide" to use in your life, but I can't imagine basing my entire existence upon it.
 

Rajie

Senior Member
LiberalDem said:
So, wouldn't it stand to reason that before King James got to the bible, someone else edited it? I guess the reason I find believing so complicitly in the bible dangerous is that it was written by men, who are by their very nature, fallible. I think the bible (The New Testament) is a great "guide" to use in your life, but I can't imagine basing my entire existence upon it.

Yep, you are correct. The one thing I always hate when talking "biblical" is that most people for some strange reason think that the Bible just fell right out of the sky written in said way. It was compiled, and there are different retellings of events (such as Revelations, for instance) that for whatever reasons the Catholics (or whoever was compiling) didn't feel the need to add to the doctrine . Then there are the errors one has to feasibly take into consideration that crop up when someone (a man, usually) makes when translating the Bible. So yes, of course, the "smart" Christian must take into consideration that their holy text, just by its very nature, is laden with errors and mistakes, from its writers to the translations. So there are invariably going to be "problems."

I mean, take the first LoTR movie for example, the translators had problems translating English to Chinese without horrible gaffes in the dialogue, and that was just a 2+ hour movie...
 

Zatoichi

Member
LiberalDem said:
The thing that gets me about the bible is this: There are different versions. If the bible is the Word of God, how can there be different versions? I am a Catholic, and although I don't attend mass as much as I'd like, I'd like to think I'm pretty devout. Not to the point of blindness. Is the bible a good story? Yes. Do I belive Jesus Christ was the son of God, born of the Virgin Mary? Yes. Do I believe every word written in it? No.

And that's all I have to say 'bout that. :D

The Doctrine of inerrancy only applies to the autographs (original texts penned by the inspired writers). Inerrancy does not extend to copies and it does not extend to translations. Through literary criticizm and study they are reasonably sure that the current versions are pretty accurate to the original texts.

Do I believe that the Bible is the Word of God? Yes, I do. Do I believe it is complete? I can't see how we can know that or not... I highly doubt it as there seems to be many things unexplained and missing. Do I believe that our culture is capable to discerning the full meaning of most passages when those passages were being communicated to a people who's culture we cannot hope to salvage or understand? I don't think so. I will probably take a good deal of flak here for my beliefs, but I assure you that if you ask me, I have as much basis for my beliefs as you for yours. Laugh if you want, look down on me if you want, insult me if you want. It won't affect my faith, but if you want, talk to me, I am open for discussion, PM me if you want my SN.
 
U

Under the Cloak

Ah, The Bible. So much stuff is in it. Solomon had seven hundred wives, Cain was the first murderer, a woman was turned into salt becasue she disobeyed God, Jonah was swallowed by a whale, Noah built an ark all by himself because he was the only rightous man and God decided to kill off the rest of mankind.

And so many other things, but I read the book of Revelations and I had to see a therapist after I read it. But, what can I say?
 
B

babylily

I think that the Bible is true somewhat. We shouldn't take everything it says to heart though. It was written by man and not handed down by God. I agree though it can be very inspiring.
 

Viper9

Member
I agree that Augustine was singularly important. Were it not for him, Christianity would not be wedded to patriotism. It was Augustine who tied the church into the state. Aquinas is important mostly for trying to make sense of Christian beliefs by combining them with Greek philosophy.

It had been tried at the Church's conception, and the early Fathers were highly influenced by Platonism (some by Stoicism), but by Aquinas' time all of the attempts had failed. So he turned to Aristotle. So desperate was he to make Christian beliefs sensible, that he attached them to the philosophy of a man who claimed that women had fewer teeth than men -- without bothering to check.

My favourite Bible verse is: Psalm 137:8 -- look it up, it's fun!
 

Baalam

Member
I went to Catholic school for a week and I don't think I ever really "read" the Bible (prolly b/c the “religious” spokespersons at any school I went to were all hypocrites, if you know what I mean) unless "ordered" to read a passage or worse, memorize a passage by a teacher.

That was the same in my case, I used to hate it. I think the biggest thing keeping people from Christianity is the Christians themeselves -Not all of course, but you can't deny many non-christians blame hypocrites for keeping them away.
And on the subject, I love reading the bible, though for me its more spiritual than anything. I can't read it for knowledge, because when I do that all I get is facts and soon become bored. I need to read it to get inspiration and spiritual growth, because its then that I feel most connected with God.

So yea, the bible is an awesome piece of literature. I didn't get into it until a year or so ago, and nowdays I read the old testament for ideas for stories, (I do enjoy quotes), and the new testament is great for sorting out my life.
Overall for me the bible is more spiritualy entertaining than factual, if that makes any sense...

And my favourite passage is Ephesians 6: 10-20
 
What I find most interesting about the Bible is the earlier mythology it borrows from. In fact if the Biblical inerrancy quacks and fundamentalist creationists would stop touting themselves as "holier than thou" ad infinitum ad nauseum and come together and look into their religions' shared origins, the world would be a much more peaceful place. They all worship the sun in the long run (seriously look it up, a lot of the holy books are based on early myths about the sun).

Is it an important piece of work, yes. Interesting, absolutely. Should it be taken literally, HELL NO!

I do in fact like many of the stories in the Bible. Taken allegorically, it does provide a person with a recipe for life, while I don't agree that recipe is the only way to bake your cake, it couldn't hurt to take a bite of it now and again, if you get the right part it's just as sweet as any cake you could bake anyways.

As far as using the Bible in your work: I think it is definitely a great source of inspiration, in fact even Atheists like biology witer Richard Dawkins draw inspiration from it. I believe he said something along the lines of recognizing the authorship of Ecclesiastes as wonderous art, but at the same time pointed out that "sophisticated theologians," including the pope, no longer claim the Bible to be literal.

I am personally looking into using the Bible for parts of my work to develop charcters. In the current religious atmosphere in America, not enough can be said about how the book relates to us. A character who invokes God or cites the Bible from time to time can very easily be related to by your reader. In fact this discussion reminds me of some Clemens works where he mentions Providence through the characters extremely often.
 
I

Ilan Bouchard

Vixen said:
Ha! Good pioint. I just hope no on etakes the idea of stealing one from a hotel too seriously. Goodwill has lots of cheap Bibles, as do many used book stores. Even for the non-religious out there, it is a good read.
:oops: Well, it was placed by the Gideans, so I figured it'd be ok.

Go to amazon and look at some of the reviews people have posted about the Bible. Pretty entertaining stuff.
 

strangedaze

Senior Member
The Old Testament is *so* interesting. In fact, most sacred religious texts are. I'm reading the Qur'an for a class I'm taking and it's making for a fine read. There's a reason why Bloom advocates the addition of them in the all-powerful literary canon...
 
Top