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Terminology For Different Passes (1 Viewer)

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TheMightyAz

Mentor
I've written that as ambiguously as I can because I'm not always certain what terminology I should use. I have a rough idea but I'm not happy with that. So, what are the different terms and what do they mean? Here are my 'rough' interpretation:

Draft: Changing, altering, adding, removing, rearranging story elements
Edit: Checking for style consistency, word choice, vocabulary use, repetition, dead words, weak words, filler words etc.
Proof reading: Checking for grammar, spelling and punctuation.

Any others? And am I close? I often use 'draft' as an all encompassing word meaning them all. That could be a me thing but is it also used by other people in the same way?
 
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PiP

Staff member
Co-Owner
Rough Draft?
Edit/Proofread - I edit for any one of these reasons.
@TheMightyAz As you mentioned:
Checking for style consistency, word choice, vocabulary use, repetition, dead words, weak words, filler words etc.
Checking for grammar, spelling and punctuation.

Then I would ask someone to proofread. I cannot proofread my own work.

Then I have the Final Draft
 

Phil Istine

WF Veterans
Rough Draft?
Edit/Proofread - I edit for any one of these reasons.
@TheMightyAz As you mentioned:
Checking for style consistency, word choice, vocabulary use, repetition, dead words, weak words, filler words etc.
Checking for grammar, spelling and punctuation.

Then I would ask someone to proofread. I cannot proofread my own work.

Then I have the Final Draft
I might add a beta read in there late on for feedback on whether there are plot holes that haven't been spotted.
 

Kyle R

WF Veterans
My experiences so far have been:

1) Draft
2) Feedback (story structure, plot problems, character inconsistencies, etc...). Some also call this "Developmental Edits".
3) Rewrite/Revise as needed
4) (Repeat the steps 2 and 3, if necessary, until writer and/or editor is satisfied)
5) Copyedit (sentence structure, SPaG, etc...)
6) Proofing (story is physically printed, with an unfinished or temporary cover, to catch any other copyediting or formatting errors that have been missed). This is also the copy that's often used for early reviews and/or promotional purposes. Also called an "ARC" (Advance Review Copy).
7) Make any final revisions.
8) Off to print!
 
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TheMightyAz

Mentor
Rough Draft?
Edit/Proofread - I edit for any one of these reasons.
@TheMightyAz As you mentioned:
Checking for style consistency, word choice, vocabulary use, repetition, dead words, weak words, filler words etc.
Checking for grammar, spelling and punctuation.

Then I would ask someone to proofread. I cannot proofread my own work.

Then I have the Final Draft
Is 'rough draft' an actual term though or is it just a way of saying a quick draft? To me 'rough draft' is still simply a draft. And final draft also feels unofficial in that it's also still only 'draft' but the last one.
 

Steve_Rivers

Senior Member
I remember just the other day watching Brandon Sanderson's latest video, talking with his editors. He calls his first draft "The Vomit Draft." I rather like that.
 
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indianroads

Staff member
Global Moderator
Call it whatever you like - it's YOUR process. Call ieeny meany miny moe if you like, what you call something counts much less than what it does.

I use:
Plot 1,2,3... etc.
First draft (not sure why the 'first' is there, because there's usually only one).
Edit 1,2,3... etc.
Editor feedback
Edit 1,2,3... etc.
Book format, 1,2,3... etc.
Then I call it done.
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
Call it whatever you like - it's YOUR process. Call ieeny meany miny moe if you like, what you call something counts much less than what it does.

I use:
Plot 1,2,3... etc.
First draft (not sure why the 'first' is there, because there's usually only one).
Edit 1,2,3... etc.
Editor feedback
Edit 1,2,3... etc.
Book format, 1,2,3... etc.
Then I call it done.
This isn't about personal methods, it about THE terms used. Not personal terms ('call it what you like') the terms the industry recognises, and their definitions.
 

indianroads

Staff member
Global Moderator
This isn't about personal methods, it about THE terms used. Not personal terms ('call it what you like') the terms the industry recognises, and their definitions.
Industry standard terms implies that there is an industry standard process, and I doubt there is a standardized writing process... other than: press keyboard keys and make a story.
In broad strokes we could say there is:
The plot (but pansters don't use this).
A first and subsequent drafts.
Edits.
Beta Readers.
Editors.
Proof readers.
Final draft.
Finished product.

Those are just guesses though.
 

Gamer_2k4

WF Veterans
All these words mean different things to different people, unfortunately. There was a fairly prolific writer here a while back (I don't recall his name, and he might still be around), who claimed he didn't do "rewrites" - but admitted after he finished his first draft, he would take another pass at it, and sometimes rework or remove thousands of words. To me, that's a rewrite.

Complicating the matter is that different writers have different processes. Someone mentioned Sanderson's "vomit draft," but there are plenty of people, myself included, who work hard to get it right on the first draft. I don't have time to write tens of thousands of words of bad writing just so I can say I did something.

Anyway, the terminology I use is simply "draft." I have a first draft that's a completed and largely polished story, though I often have a number of outstanding notes I'll need to take care of before I'll share it with others. Addressing those notes results in a second draft, which gets sent off to beta readers. Then I'll take their feedback into account and produce a third (and hopefully final) draft.

That's it. I don't see any point in dividing it further; after all, even if I'm focusing on plot consistency, I'm not going to avoid fixing a grammar error just because it's not the "proofread draft."
 

-xXx-

Financial Supporter
once upon a time
a wonderfully imaginative linguishioner
(fashioner of all manner of language.ness),

hellfrozeover=false while (hellfrozeover=false) { write edit <------- place where I need someone to inject a line of nefarious code

<echo off>
<snip>
<secured>
<clear.clear/dear/ly>
<"@"rest>
tweet ("#AmWriting!") }

did pronounce and declare,
"self.endure-assure/ed/ly, ars-tek-m.aster-y!!!"


if (hellfrozeover=true) { publish }

and so it was,
throughout the land,
forever more!


I better ask @-xXx- to translate :)
better?
;)

-retrieves a netherbit-
-here.n.again-
-three blips will do-
 
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apocalypsegal

Senior Member
As I learned it decades ago, it basically is:

idea
outline
draft
edit pass
final
galley
book

Though it often was:

idea
draft
edit pass
galley
book

Despite what some think, writers typically didn't spend a lot of time rewriting. They couldn't afford to. They had to get a book (or a short) in the publisher's hands so they could pay the bills and survive long enough to get the next book/short out. Spending years working and reworking a single manuscript? Maybe for an academic, who had a cushy job keeping them going, and their goal was getting an award and/or tenure. But the general writer? Nah. Had to push out enough words to get a check, because baby was hungry and the landlord was pounding at the door.

Today it really doesn't matter what any particular writer's process is. If it works for them, all good. One draft, four, twenty. Doesn't matter. Outline? Pants? Anywhere in between? Doesn't matter. Most people spend a lot less time arguing the "hack" vs "author" debate. Like with self publishing vs traditional, there's no point to it. Do what works for you. Do what gets you from idea to "THE END" with the least amount of trouble, and let others do the same.
 
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