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Mark Twain't

Senior Member
When lockdown happened last year, I decided to finally write that novel which I'd never got around to doing. The idea was to self publish, probably using Kindle Self Publishing. It was never supposed to be a commercial enterprise, it was just something that I wanted to do.

Fast forward to a little over a year later and I'm fairly close to a completed manuscript and I was chatting to my sister the other day and she suggested that I sent it to some publishers in order to get some feedback. Is this something that they do? I was always under the impression that, if they deemed an author's work worthy of opening and if they weren't going to take it on, so to speak, all you'd get was a rejection or am I wrong and you get some constructive feedback?

I've had a google and found 3 potential UK based publishers

https://www.austinmacauley.com/

https://www.novum-publishing.co.uk/home.html

https://olympiapublishers.com/

Has abyone here dealt with the above or can recommend any others?

Thanks
 

Matchu

Senior Member
If you get yourself a subscription to Duotrope...which is free until they charge you £42 in a year from now...you can search under title 'publishers' plus the parameters 'English' or 'horror' by way of examples and a clutch of large/medium and the small publishing houses appear on your screen.

The little ones request a manuscript, a bio of 150, and sometimes an outline of what you are posting. Otherwise - you are left with Google and endlessly clicking 'publisher fiction' and you never quite wade toward your own people. I dunno, I just got one away so am in a state of high...but note it was a Northern small publisher and I received a personal response in the receipt.
 

Mark Twain't

Senior Member
If you get yourself a subscription to Duotrope...which is free until they charge you £42 in a year from now...you can search under title 'publishers' plus the parameters 'English' or 'horror' by way of examples and a clutch of large/medium and the small publishing houses appear on your screen.

The little ones request a manuscript, a bio of 150, and sometimes an outline of what you are posting. Otherwise - you are left with Google and endlessly clicking 'publisher fiction' and you never quite wade toward your own people. I dunno, I just got one away so am in a state of high...but note it was a Northern small publisher and I received a personal response in the receipt.

Thanks, I've registered with Duotrope and I'll have a good look through that
 

Matchu

Senior Member
I think Austin Macauley is a vanity publisher so avoid that one. Go for the ones that say things along the lines of 'we publish crime stories set in the Sussex region' rather than the 'we all have one dream, we all have one story within our hearts, and here at Churchill P Eisenstein world associates we facilitate the journey toward your publication vision, asshole.'
 

Selorian

Patron
When lockdown happened last year, I decided to finally write that novel which I'd never got around to doing. The idea was to self publish, probably using Kindle Self Publishing. It was never supposed to be a commercial enterprise, it was just something that I wanted to do.

Fast forward to a little over a year later and I'm fairly close to a completed manuscript and I was chatting to my sister the other day and she suggested that I sent it to some publishers in order to get some feedback. Is this something that they do? I was always under the impression that, if they deemed an author's work worthy of opening and if they weren't going to take it on, so to speak, all you'd get was a rejection or am I wrong and you get some constructive feedback?

I've had a google and found 3 potential UK based publishers

https://www.austinmacauley.com/

https://www.novum-publishing.co.uk/home.html

https://olympiapublishers.com/

Has abyone here dealt with the above or can recommend any others?

Thanks

Since the second part of your question has been addressed, I'll touch on the first part.

For the most part, you won't receive any meaningful feedback on your manuscript from a publisher. The best you can hope for is a reason for the rejection and possibly a few helpful insights on how to make it better. But you have to take into account that very seldom will any publisher ever read your entire manuscript, it will normally be anywhere from three pages to three chapters. This doesn't give them the ability to give any meaningful feedback even if they had time to do so. And sometimes, it may be that your particular story simply doesn't fit into their publishing plans and not that there is something wrong with it that caused the rejection.

Whether you are going for traditional or self-publishing, if you want to get more professional feedback on your story, it may be worthwhile to find a freelance editor to work with.

Hope this helps.
 

Mark Twain't

Senior Member
Since the second part of your question has been addressed, I'll touch on the first part.

For the most part, you won't receive any meaningful feedback on your manuscript from a publisher. The best you can hope for is a reason for the rejection and possibly a few helpful insights on how to make it better. But you have to take into account that very seldom will any publisher ever read your entire manuscript, it will normally be anywhere from three pages to three chapters. This doesn't give them the ability to give any meaningful feedback even if they had time to do so. And sometimes, it may be that your particular story simply doesn't fit into their publishing plans and not that there is something wrong with it that caused the rejection.

Whether you are going for traditional or self-publishing, if you want to get more professional feedback on your story, it may be worthwhile to find a freelance editor to work with.

Hope this helps.

Thanks, that helps a lot and pretty much aligns with what I originally thought with regards to publishers.

At the end of the day, this is more of a personal project rather than any desire to make money. It's a journey I've very much enjoyed over the last year and one I intend to continue on.
 

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