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Share the joy: what's your writing success today? (3 Viewers)

Theglasshouse

WF Veterans
I got inspired today after reading a story and so after reading critically I am planning on replacing the characters, theme, and I should have an original story since I am only to reimagine it drastically. It's a reimagining.

I found this book that talks about photography and how to be inspired by it. Picture memoirs can help me describe better. They aren't expensive usually I believe, and I found one that has 500 pages and costs 4 dollars. The location of the place is what I wanted, and it has pictures to help imagine the place as well as facts. The below book prompted it. Photo memoirs could be a decent way to describe. I do appreciate the previous advice on description. This was can be used for any sort of descriptive writing. So this is another approach if you will.

Write What You See: 99 Photos to Inspire Writing

I dont usually rewrite stories which is why I am going to say this is the first time I retell a different story.


Some strategies are photo essays (the best strategy for description since it is free and includes the vocabulary on the internet): Analyzing photo essays, family photos, found photographs, and memoirs.
 
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Taylor

Friends of WF
Client? What are you writing?

There are significant changes in policy at the provincial government due to Covid with respect to financial controls. Employees need training. I'm designing and authoring the training manuals and scripts for the training videos.

I was worried when I took on the contract that my novel would stall, but it hasn't and I am still finding time to write. :)

I'm actually finding it quite inspiring working in government again. The basis for my novel involves public policy, and it's something that fascinates me. I'm hoping it's something that people will like to read about when wrapped in fiction. Going back to working with policy in real life is like a renewal of my original motivation to write fiction.

EDIT: The other thing I just realized is that there is a fair bit of fiction writing with the training because I create fictional cases as examples of the lessons. Characters, plots and all!
 
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Taylor

Friends of WF
I got inspired today after reading a story and so after reading critically I am planning on replacing the characters, theme, and I should have an original story since I am only to reimagine it drastically. It's a reimagining.

I found this book that talks about photography and how to be inspired by it. Picture memoirs can help me describe better. They aren't expensive usually I believe, and I found one that has 500 pages and costs 4 dollars. The location of the place is what I wanted, and it has pictures to help imagine the place as well as facts. The below book prompted it. Photo memoirs could be a decent way to describe. I do appreciate the previous advice on description. This was can be used for any sort of descriptive writing. So this is another approach if you will.

Write What You See: 99 Photos to Inspire Writing

I dont usually rewrite stories which is why I am going to say this is the first time I retell a different story.

Oh I'm so happy for you...that sounds perfect! Have fun!! :)
 

indianroads

Staff member
Board Moderator
There are significant changes in policy at the provincial government due to Covid with respect to financial controls. Employees need training. I'm designing and authoring the training manuals and scripts for the training videos.

I was worried when I took on the contract that my novel would stall, but it hasn't and I am still finding time to write. :)

I'm actually finding it quite inspiring working in government again. The basis for my novel involves public policy, and it's something that fascinates me. I'm hoping it's something that people will like to read about when wrapped in fiction. Going back to working with policy in real life is like a renewal of my original motivation to write fiction.

EDIT: The other thing I just realized is that there is a fair bit of fiction writing with the training because I create fictional cases as examples of the lessons. Characters, plots and all!

that’s interesting. I believe that anytime we compose thoughts in writing we learn and improve.
 

indianroads

Staff member
Board Moderator
Today when my dedicated writing time turned into complete bus-garage-calling chaos over getting my son where he needed to go, I still managed to churn out fifteen minutes of writing and then started to dissect this story to see what it needs and doesn't need. Still working, still in it.

Overcoming obstacles in my creative life is a big deal for me so I'm very happy! (and thank you for a place to mention it)
Awesome!
 

Taylor

Friends of WF
that’s interesting. I believe that anytime we compose thoughts in writing we learn and improve.

Oh I know. I started doing this type of work about 10 years ago. In the early days it took me forever to craft the fictional cases. They have to illustrate the issue while the characters basically screw up so the participants can see what not to do, and what the potential outcome would be. I remember having the drafts go around and around to various policy folks for revisions. That was so educational because now, I just bang them together.

I see that you have drawn on your engineering experience with the Extinction Series. Have you ever thought of writing a modern day mystery around Silicon Valley?

 

indianroads

Staff member
Board Moderator
Oh I know. I started doing this type of work about 10 years ago. In the early days it took me forever to craft the fictional cases. They have to illustrate the issue while the characters basically screw up so the participants can see what not to do, and what the potential outcome would be. I remember having the drafts go around and around to various policy folks for revisions. That was so educational because now, I just bang them together.

I see that you have drawn on your engineering experience with the Extinction Series. Have you ever thought of writing a modern day mystery around Silicon Valley?


I second this idea!

That's never crossed my mind... and I'll give it some thought.

A heist would be amusing... everyone would get stuck in traffic.
 

BornForBurning

Senior Member
Getting back to the dang craft. Man, if I have to sacrifice reading this modernist degeneracy in my textual analysis class to actually find the time to write some experimental pulp (ala my working lifeblood), I'll stop reading the modernism. Cane is awful. Story upon story about touching a black woman's chest. No. Thank. You.

On a bright side, my fiction writing professor wants us to start pitching short story ideas, so I threw her one of my stuck-in-the-basement-at-2AM-with-old-friends concepts:

Thomas Dutch is Copperman, a human with the supernatural ability to turn into molten metal and absolutely nothing else, forcing him to rely on his stoic blacksmith girlfriend to forge him into a blade of raw iron and defeat the CYBERWITCHES, an order of demon-worshipping women with extensive cybernetic enhancements that jack into HELL ITSELF.
 

EternalGreen

Senior Member
Getting back to the dang craft. Man, if I have to sacrifice reading this modernist degeneracy in my textual analysis class to actually find the time to write some experimental pulp (ala my working lifeblood), I'll stop reading the modernism. Cane is awful. Story upon story about touching a black woman's chest. No. Thank. You.


To quote the racism watchdog: "Woof."
 

vranger

Staff member
Board Moderator
After finishing the first draft last night, I started my first read through tonight. The purpose of this read through focuses on flow, continuity, and loose ends. Like, you write something in Chapter One you mean to be important, and you never get back to it. :) I did that, and I'm going to need to add a couple of lines at the end of the book to pretend I didn't just forget about the reference ... like I did.

In my defense, I wrote the first three chapters twelve years ago, so they're not as fresh in my mind as everything I wrote starting the end of last September.

I do this read through in the software, so that if I spot a typo or a sentence I should revise, I can do that on the fly. I'm calling it quits for the night after the first scene in Chapter Three ... getting tired and that leads to missing things. Having written this portion twelve years ago, I'm catching more to clean up than I find in more recent work. Plus, Chapter Two was a long chapter, 6,000 words ... a bit of a grind as I restructured a lot of sentences.
 

JBF

Senior Member
Revisiting an old idea. Nothing written yet, but I think it may have wheels provided I can figure out how to translate the concept into story form.

Long story short, I was reading one of my regular blogs a while back. Somehow the topic drifted onto the subject of evil in the everyday world and another commenter (an ex-cop) mentioned something that jarred this loose. Per his recollection, there were a number of times over the years that he knew for a certainty he'd been in the presence of something sinister - beyond the norm of working daily with society's underbelly, at any rate - and been especially glad to hand off custody of those particular individuals to either the jail staff or other agencies.

Among the worst, he said, were the time he's been standing in front of a door with one hand on the knob and his weapon drawn and known at the gut level there was something patently evil waiting on the other side. A cousin who spent the better part of a decade doing similar work in the early '80s had stories eerily similar, as had a former coworker of mine who had a front-row seat when the U.S. military was working house-to-house in Iraq. There was always the sense of danger - but sometimes there was an extra note of malice that set one incidence apart from the next.

Having never been military or LE, I had an experience in that same vein from my last job. I lived near the middle of a good-sized town, then. The four blocks north of the apartment were comprised of churches. Parking lots filled up on Sunday, but the rest of the week things were pretty quiet. Everything else surrounding was light commercial or residential. Except for the couple a few doors down having a domestic dispute every other week we didn't see a whole lot of excitement.

Anyway. I'm a habitual night owl. If I wasn't working the next day, my habits usually kept me up until three or four in the morning. In this particular instance I was in the living room watching a movie with the lights off. I finished up around two and started shuffling snack trash to the kitchen. Only walking back into the living room I see this silhouette on the blinds. Not doing anything...just standing in front of my window. The four church lots all had good parking floods, so whoever it was, they were pretty thoroughly backlit.

No big deal. There were a couple of neighbors who kept the same hours as me. I figured one of them couldn't sleep, or had to take the dog out, or was out on a smoke break. Normal apartment stuff.

I drop my trash in the kitchen and I'm going back into the bedroom when I hear the door rattle. Probably just a fluke, but when I look again there's no shadow on the blinds. Maybe a drunk. Maybe somebody sleepwalking. The place was locked up, so it didn't matter much.

Except it don't happen just the once.

So me, figuring this might be a development, goes and gets ye olde home defense shotgun and a flashlight. By the time I got back the noise had quit, and I went up and checked the peephole to see if my new friend had vacated.

Nope. Standing right there in front of the door. I couldn't make out too much in the way of the details, being as the light was all behind him, but I could tell he wasn't swaying like a drunk or twitching like a meth-head, and if he'd been one of the neighbors he would have had the courtesy to knock. And even though I couldn't see his face I knew he was staring at me. Sort of that slow, patient type of look you see with apex predators. The hard stare. The kind you feel.

We stood it off for a couple of minutes before he shuffled off into the bushes next door. Never did find out who he was or what he wanted, but I tell you one thing...you could feel the off-ness of the whole affair. That clinging, lingering sense of something being dead wrong and just all of a sudden realizing there's more on the table than you remember betting.

I guess we got lucky. Neither one of us got to learn anything new and ugly like we might have otherwise.

So yeah. The evil on the other side of the door.

There's probably a way to hammer that into something readable.
 

TheMightyAz

Senior Member
Revisiting an old idea. Nothing written yet, but I think it may have wheels provided I can figure out how to translate the concept into story form.

Long story short, I was reading one of my regular blogs a while back. Somehow the topic drifted onto the subject of evil in the everyday world and another commenter (an ex-cop) mentioned something that jarred this loose. Per his recollection, there were a number of times over the years that he knew for a certainty he'd been in the presence of something sinister - beyond the norm of working daily with society's underbelly, at any rate - and been especially glad to hand off custody of those particular individuals to either the jail staff or other agencies.

Among the worst, he said, were the time he's been standing in front of a door with one hand on the knob and his weapon drawn and known at the gut level there was something patently evil waiting on the other side. A cousin who spent the better part of a decade doing similar work in the early '80s had stories eerily similar, as had a former coworker of mine who had a front-row seat when the U.S. military was working house-to-house in Iraq. There was always the sense of danger - but sometimes there was an extra note of malice that set one incidence apart from the next.

Having never been military or LE, I had an experience in that same vein from my last job. I lived near the middle of a good-sized town, then. The four blocks north of the apartment were comprised of churches. Parking lots filled up on Sunday, but the rest of the week things were pretty quiet. Everything else surrounding was light commercial or residential. Except for the couple a few doors down having a domestic dispute every other week we didn't see a whole lot of excitement.

Anyway. I'm a habitual night owl. If I wasn't working the next day, my habits usually kept me up until three or four in the morning. In this particular instance I was in the living room watching a movie with the lights off. I finished up around two and started shuffling snack trash to the kitchen. Only walking back into the living room I see this silhouette on the blinds. Not doing anything...just standing in front of my window. The four church lots all had good parking floods, so whoever it was, they were pretty thoroughly backlit.

No big deal. There were a couple of neighbors who kept the same hours as me. I figured one of them couldn't sleep, or had to take the dog out, or was out on a smoke break. Normal apartment stuff.

I drop my trash in the kitchen and I'm going back into the bedroom when I hear the door rattle. Probably just a fluke, but when I look again there's no shadow on the blinds. Maybe a drunk. Maybe somebody sleepwalking. The place was locked up, so it didn't matter much.

Except it don't happen just the once.

So me, figuring this might be a development, goes and gets ye olde home defense shotgun and a flashlight. By the time I got back the noise had quit, and I went up and checked the peephole to see if my new friend had vacated.

Nope. Standing right there in front of the door. I couldn't make out too much in the way of the details, being as the light was all behind him, but I could tell he wasn't swaying like a drunk or twitching like a meth-head, and if he'd been one of the neighbors he would have had the courtesy to knock. And even though I couldn't see his face I knew he was staring at me. Sort of that slow, patient type of look you see with apex predators. The hard stare. The kind you feel.

We stood it off for a couple of minutes before he shuffled off into the bushes next door. Never did find out who he was or what he wanted, but I tell you one thing...you could feel the off-ness of the whole affair. That clinging, lingering sense of something being dead wrong and just all of a sudden realizing there's more on the table than you remember betting.

I guess we got lucky. Neither one of us got to learn anything new and ugly like we might have otherwise.

So yeah. The evil on the other side of the door.

There's probably a way to hammer that into something readable.

I think you just did. LOL. You little devil you ...
 

Taylor

Friends of WF

indianroads

Staff member
Board Moderator
After finishing the first draft last night, I started my first read through tonight. The purpose of this read through focuses on flow, continuity, and loose ends. Like, you write something in Chapter One you mean to be important, and you never get back to it. :) I did that, and I'm going to need to add a couple of lines at the end of the book to pretend I didn't just forget about the reference ... like I did.

In my defense, I wrote the first three chapters twelve years ago, so they're not as fresh in my mind as everything I wrote starting the end of last September.

I do this read through in the software, so that if I spot a typo or a sentence I should revise, I can do that on the fly. I'm calling it quits for the night after the first scene in Chapter Three ... getting tired and that leads to missing things. Having written this portion twelve years ago, I'm catching more to clean up than I find in more recent work. Plus, Chapter Two was a long chapter, 6,000 words ... a bit of a grind as I restructured a lot of sentences.

Congratulations - sounds like your work is moving in a good direction.

One thing that has helped me in my editing passes is to have my computer read my work back to me. Too often when I read my own work my eye glosses over a wrong word (spelled correctly, but it's not the word I intended to use) and also missing or duplicated words.

I use MS Word to write, which has a 'SPEAK' utility built into it - you just have to activate it. At the very top-left of the Word window you have the file-save, undo, and redo options, next to that is a pull-down button where you can add more options. Select 'More Commands' and look for 'Speak'. The voice kinda sounds like Stephen Hawking, and occasionally mispronounced words, but I catch a TON of errors using this feature.

Each edit consists of two passes. The first is me reading the text, correcting errors and looking for plot-holes. On the next pass I listen to Stephen, and clean up what he catches.

Anyway, this is a process that works for me, and so may not work for anyone else - but I just thought I'd mention it.
 

indianroads

Staff member
Board Moderator
What a beautiful story. It has inspired me this morning. I was looking for some typical quote about, "Behind every successful man... blah blah blah" But there are so many different versions.

Maybe the story speaks more to a team. Whatever that team is comprised of....

As a huge Vonnegut fan, I enjoyed that.
 

vranger

Staff member
Board Moderator
It sounds like a good tactic. I couldn't personally use it here, because I'm writing in our den, and my wife may be watching TV or reading, and that would be distracting to her.

At this point, any proofreading is only opportunistic. Once all revision is complete, I then run the novel through my proofreading app. It splits the novel into discreet sentences, then presents them to me one sentence at a time in random order. When you mention your eye glossing over a wrong word, that typically happens when you proof the work straight through. You wind up reading the story rather than concentrating on the words, and read over mistakes.

Examining one sentence at a time, and in no particular order, eliminates that problem. In a list below, I display the sentence in context just in case that's useful, and it sometimes is. Over time I've added several points of analysis, and I display warnings for things like homonyms, clichés, copulas, overworked words, filler words, etc.

After one pass through every sentence, the app bumps a proofreading revision number, and then repeats the process with only the sentences revised in the first pass. That's because it's quite likely to introduce a new error as you fix another one. :) The revision passes continue until no revised sentences remain. Typically, each of my own passes is about 10% of the number of sentences from the previous pass. Those aren't all because I introduced another error ... most often it's just continued fiddling with a sentence I didn't like the first time around. By the time that's done, it's pretty solid.

Years ago I read somewhere that NY houses find approximately 7 typos in a full length novel to be acceptable after editing. I'm looking to beat that standard by the time I have a finished product.

Congratulations - sounds like your work is moving in a good direction.

One thing that has helped me in my editing passes is to have my computer read my work back to me. Too often when I read my own work my eye glosses over a wrong word (spelled correctly, but it's not the word I intended to use) and also missing or duplicated words.

I use MS Word to write, which has a 'SPEAK' utility built into it - you just have to activate it. At the very top-left of the Word window you have the file-save, undo, and redo options, next to that is a pull-down button where you can add more options. Select 'More Commands' and look for 'Speak'. The voice kinda sounds like Stephen Hawking, and occasionally mispronounced words, but I catch a TON of errors using this feature.

Each edit consists of two passes. The first is me reading the text, correcting errors and looking for plot-holes. On the next pass I listen to Stephen, and clean up what he catches.

Anyway, this is a process that works for me, and so may not work for anyone else - but I just thought I'd mention it.
 
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