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Script Writing Question (1 Viewer)

Uriah

Senior Member
When dealing with a chracter whom has an accent. Do you write the dialogue so that it represents (phonically) the accent you want? (You know like if: I's a Suth'ner an' wann'ed tah reedah to unnerstan tah ack'sent I's use'in?)That's going a bit overboard but I think you understand my question.

Or do you just write the lines and let the actor and director handle the accent?


Thanks
 

ebmadman

Senior Member
Writing in dialect is not considered politically correct in the industry. It's a sure fire way to offend someone or simply get your script thrown away. Just place in parenthesis, right before the dialogue, "southern accent" , etc.
 
Last edited:

mammamaia

Senior Member
When dealing with a chracter whom has an accent. Do you write the dialogue so that it represents (phonically) the accent you want? (You know like if: I's a Suth'ner an' wann'ed tah reedah to unnerstan tah ack'sent I's use'in?)That's going a bit overboard but I think you understand my question.
...no!... as eb noted, you're likely to have your script tossed if you indulge in such a newbie no-no...

Or do you just write the lines and let the actor and director handle the accent?

yes... if it's a one-time thing, you do it like this:

SONNY
(heavy southern accent)
I'm a Southerner and want the actor to use the accent I'm using.

...if the character is an ongoing one, you specify the accent in his/her introduction, so you won't have to add the 'wrylie' for every bit of dialog... like this:

EXT. SMALL TOWN STREET - DAY

SONNY (40-ish), raw-boned and ugly as sin, gets off a rickety, dust-covered bus. He walks up to a MAN on the sidewalk and taps him on the shoulder. Sonny speaks with a southern accent thick enough to stop a bullet.

SONNY
Say, there, Pops! Where
the dickens am I?

hope this helps... love and hugs, maia
 
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