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Robin Hobb (1 Viewer)

Emma LB

Senior Member
Shadeslayer said:
Robert Jordan (to me, personally) is an excellent writer, even better than J.R.R.Tolkien himself. He writes like Tolkien, but his style is more discriptive, complex and very interesting.

Hmm... that's the one thing I love about Tolkien - his style. I rather hate the 'descriptive, complex and very interesting style'. :wink: Robin Hobb's style isn't quite that bad in my opinion, But sometimes I just feel she's bit to descriptive. I mean it's nice to know everything about all those characters, but sometimes, when I don't have much time, i wish she wrote shorter books, leaving me to imagine the details if you know what I mean. She writes many things that the reader could have imagined himself, where her descriptions were superfluous. Nevertheless, I still enjoy her books, because it's not the language itself with is descriptive and flowery, it's just that she describes things in detail. There is a difference... :wink:

Argh, I'm still waiting for that one last book of her's to come out here. I want it now! :x

I haven't read the tower series by King, maybe I should. My friend has nearly every Stephen King book, she must have those too...
 

Creative_Insanity

Senior Member
A_MacLaren said:
I recommend Steven Erikson. He's better than Hobb (trust me on this).
I just picked up the first book from the library. So far it's very good. I'll admit I was a little skeptical when I saw the coverart :oops: , but it's actually very high quality. Thanks so much for the recommendation. I'll get back to you with a review when I finish.
 

Talia_Brie

Senior Member
Creative_Insanity said:
A_MacLaren said:
I recommend Steven Erikson. He's better than Hobb (trust me on this).
I just picked up the first book from the library. So far it's very good. I'll admit I was a little skeptical when I saw the coverart :oops: , but it's actually very high quality. Thanks so much for the recommendation. I'll get back to you with a review when I finish.

You will not be disappointed. Erikson is brilliant.
 

Pawn

Patron
Just wanted to say that I took some of your splendid advice and am currently thoroughly enjoying the second book in R.R Martin's 'A Song of Ice and Fire'. After finishing the first, buying the second was definitely not a matter of choice.
 

Rob

Senior Member
The difficulty with taking advice from others about what books to read is that we all have different tastes. I could recommend to you a book I'd read and enjoyed, and you might think it's crap. Your best bet is to go down your local book store and spend some time looking through the fantasy section, get a feel for the books you're thumbing through, and see what appeals to you.

Someone mentioned Stephen Donaldson's Gap series backthread. I read and thoroughly enjoyed the Thomas Covenant books some time ago, all of them (and have just bought the new one, The Runes of the Earth, the first book in The Last Chronicles of Thomas Covenant). I also read all of the Gap series, which I enjoyed greatly too, but they're a totally different kettle of fish to the Covenant books; they're more space opera than fantasy, for those who believe in such distinctions. Actually, I didn't think the first Gap book was that great, but I'm glad I kept going. By the time I was halfway through the second book I knew I'd made the right decision.

I read Donaldson's collection of short stories, Reave The Just and other tales, and thought they were very good (and have a copy of his other collection of short stories, Daughters of Regals and other tales ready for when I have the time.)

But as I said, we all have different tastes.

Cheers,
Omni
 

A_MacLaren

Senior Member
The thing about Erikson, as I see it, is that he's writing brilliant books that are just about normal people in war. That's all it is. The Chain of Dogs (it's in the second book) is a truly harrowing and horrifying account of religious war and fanatisism.
But he's also writing fantastic high-drama; gods-and-magic style stuff that he manages to make seem real. He'll never take the easy way out, either.
 

Pawn

Patron
Twas I who mentioned the Gap series. I'm building myself up for it. Maybe after this Erikson chap. Not that I'm done with Martin yet. So few years, so many books.
 

Creative_Insanity

Senior Member
A_MacLaren said:
The thing about Erikson, as I see it, is that he's writing brilliant books that are just about normal people in war. That's all it is. The Chain of Dogs (it's in the second book) is a truly harrowing and horrifying account of religious war and fanatisism.
But he's also writing fantastic high-drama; gods-and-magic style stuff that he manages to make seem real. He'll never take the easy way out, either.
Sounds like an author I could really get into. :)
 
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