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Reverend or Rev.? (1 Viewer)

TheMightyAz

Mentor
Should I spell the whole word out or use the abbreviation? It looks odd when I use the abbreviation but I'm pretty sure that's right:

The Reverend took a step back.
The Rev. took a step back.

It's that full stop. It always has bothered me even in etc. or Mrs. Sat there in the middle of a sentence makes it look wrong even though I know it's right.

And is it customary to add in the name after Rev.? In this case 'Rev. Thomson'. Is that perhaps why it looks odd to me? Having said that it would look odd in the sentence 'The Rev. Thomson took a step back'. Yes, I could lose 'the' there but just for the sake of understanding the use of it, I'll leave it as is for now.
 
Last edited:

druid12000

Senior Member
Should I spell the whole word out or use the abbreviation? It looks odd when I use the abbreviation but I'm pretty sure that's right:

The Reverend took a step back.
The Rev. took a step back. Yeah, no. Not only is not aesthetically pleasing, it halts the flow.

It's that full stop. It always has bothered me even in etc. or Mrs. Sat there in the middle of a sentence makes it look wrong even though I know it's right.

And is it customary to add in the name after Rev.? In this case 'Rev. Thomson'. Is that perhaps why it looks odd to me? Having said that it would look odd in the sentence 'The Rev. Thomson took a step back'. Yes, I could lose 'the' there but just for the sake of understanding the use of it, I'll leave it as is for now.

If it's a main character, I would consider shortening how you include/address him, perhaps make him more familiar, first name basis sort of thing. Reverend Thompson could get a bit clunky after a few pages.
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
If it's a main character, I would consider shortening how you include/address him, perhaps make him more familiar, first name basis sort of thing. Reverend Thompson could get a bit clunky after a few pages.

Yeah, that's why I thought I'd ask. It's a formal relationship though. There's a coldness about the relationship and didn't want it to sound too 'familiar'. So you think I should go with 'Rev. Thomson' most of the time with 'The Reverend ...' occasionally when describing an action?
 

druid12000

Senior Member
Yeah, that's why I thought I'd ask. It's a formal relationship though. There's a coldness about the relationship and didn't want it to sound too 'familiar'. So you think I should go with 'Rev. Thomson' most of the time with 'The Reverend ...' occasionally when describing an action?

Maybe even shorten it to just his last name. That could add to the coldness of the vibe between them.
 

Matchu

Senior Member
You have to google-research. There’s a complication where ‘reverend’ is the title & ‘Bishop’ the form of address. And it’s different for different denominations - regarding formal or informal term. Somebody will be along. I’d call him vicar.
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
You have to google-research. There’s a complication where ‘reverend’ is the title & ‘Bishop’ the form of address. And it’s different for different denominations - regarding formal or informal term. Somebody will be along. I’d call him vicar.

I nearly made him a vicar. I just thought Reverend sounded more pompous. It's a village so would it more likely be a vicar?
 

Matchu

Senior Member
The reverend walked in through the door. ‘Hello vicar!’ I said, ‘kettle’s on...’

...although I think if he’s a Methodist he might say something like ‘only the Lord is reverend, young man.’

Just do twenty minutes on web, you’ll be expert.

...

I had a friend said his lifetime’s ambition was fulfilled when he got to say ‘more tea, vicar?’
 

Matchu

Senior Member
First names...you get to meet and kind of fall in love with the vicar when your parents die :/....that’s when I kind of understood what they do these days. Although Mum’s not dead.
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
The reverend walked in through the door. ‘Hello vicar!’ I said, ‘kettle’s on...’

...although I think if he’s a Methodist he might say something like ‘only the Lord is reverend, young man.’

Just do twenty minutes on web, you’ll be expert.

...

I had a friend said his lifetime’s ambition was fulfilled when he got to say ‘more tea, vicar?’

So vicar and reverend are interchangeable? You see, this is what I was saying in my 'Education' thread. These little things I should know but don't. It's annoying.
 

Matchu

Senior Member
Honestly the knowledge is moments away from your total comprehension on-line. People ask this question all the time. It’s just like which way up do eggs go.
 

Matchu

Senior Member
Of course. It’s just complicated because in Catholicism reverend is formal and C of E only courtesy, or words to the effect. Then there’s the American arena, and a bit of research for context involved...it does get complicated. Use the confusion to your advantage in the story and have characters addressing clergy as all sorts of things - like people probably do and the old ‘just call me Nigel, folks.’
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
Of course. It’s just complicated because in Catholicism reverend is formal and C of E only courtesy, or words to the effect. Then there’s the American arena, and a bit of research for context involved...it does get complicated. Use the confusion to your advantage in the story and have characters addressing clergy as all sorts of things - like people probably do and the old ‘just call me Nigel, folks.’

I've been googling it. OH GOD, I think I'm going to kill him in the first ten minutes! Either that of just go with Rev. Thomson all the time in reference to him and Reverend when associated with actions:

"It is the word of God," said Rev. Thomson.
The Reverend opened the door and left.

Do you think that would be fine?
 

druid12000

Senior Member
I've been googling it. OH GOD, I think I'm going to kill him in the first ten minutes! Either that of just go with Rev. Thomson all the time in reference to him and Reverend when associated with actions:

"It is the word of God," said Rev. Thomson.
The Reverend opened the door and left.

Do you think that would be fine?

Ashes to ashes, another one bites the dust :icon_cheesygrin:
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
The reverend.

Rev. Thomson.

"The reverend said hello."

"Reverend (or Rev.) Thomson said hello."

It's sort of like "doctor."

"We talked to the doctor."

"We talked to Doctor Smith."

Etc.

Yeah, I think I'll stick to this format for now and do a little more research for the rewrites.
 
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