Writing Forums

Writing Forums is a privately-owned, community managed writing environment. We provide an unlimited opportunity for writers and poets of all abilities, to share their work and communicate with other writers and creative artists. We offer an experience that is safe, welcoming and friendly, regardless of your level of participation, knowledge or skill. There are several opportunities for writers to exchange tips, engage in discussions about techniques, and grow in your craft. You can also participate in forum competitions that are exciting and helpful in building your skill level. There's so much more for you to explore!

Recommended Fantasy Authors/Series. (1 Viewer)

Lythandyl

Member
A lot of these authors have been listed as forum topics with their appropriate writings, but after looking over it, a few important were missing or were in threads that I haven't had a chance to read. I'm sorry if that's the case.

I've decided to compile and update this list, because a lot of people enjoy fantasy, but are unable to find a series that holds their interest. I'll start off with a few authors, some listed already and some not, and if you'd like to suggest an author, please do so.

It'd be nice if this could be a sticky. It'll reduce the number of topics on the same authors, since the list is available to everyone on first click.

Recommended Fantasy Authors/Series

Margaret Weis & Tracy Hickman - Quite a number of trilogies for the Dragonlance series. Very much recommended to any fantasy fan.

R.A. Salvatore - A lot of his work is within the Forgotten Realms series, most importantly, in my opinion, The Dark Elf Trilogy.

Diana Wynne Jones - Great author. I've only read her Chronicles of Chrestomanci books, but they're amazing. Quite a step off from generic sword-and-magic fantasy, the books are great.

Jack Whyte - Beautiful work with the Camulod Chronicles. Very well written retelling of King Arthur's tale, a lot of it from Merlyn's point of view. Very different from any other King Arthur books, and definitely a must-read.

J.R. Tolkien - I suppose this is a given for all fantasy fans. If not, read The Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings trilogy.

David Eddings - I've read only one of his books, which I believe to be part of The Elenium trilogy, called "The Diamond Throne". Great book, Sparhawk became one of my favorite fantasy characters of all time.

George R.R. Martin - Amazing author of A "Game of Thrones", the first part of the Song of Ice and Fire series. Definitely an original setting and characters, very well written. Definitely a must-read as well.

Steven Erickson -
A MacLaren said:
I recommend Steven Erikson. Only the first book of his Malazan Book of the Fallen Series is available in America, though.

I'll update the list with more later, but these authors are among the best in my opinion. Please post your preferred authors and a name of any books or series they've written, and I'll update the list.
 
S

silverwriter

FYI About David Eddings - he is one of my favorite authors. After the Elenium, there is another set of three that goes along after the first set. (Very good)
If you like those, you'll love the ones about Polgara and her family!!
 

Lythandyl

Member
Yes, I'll definitely try to read those and more of The Elenium. I've actually tried to read Polgara the Sorceress and Belgarath the Sorcerer but I haven't seen them around in stores. I'll check again for them as soon as possible, thanks.
 

Pawn

Patron
I find David Eddings exceptionally mundane. To my mind he fits in the same skilless bracket as Robert Jordan and Terry Brooks.

Robin Hobb is much sung around here, for good reason. She's a truly exceptional author of character driven fantasy who you should check out if you're unfamiliar with her. I've also read everything by Ian Irvine, who should be praised for creating a world entirely unlike the Tolkienite creations we see so much of. Stephen Donaldson is probably, in my humble opinion, the finest fantasy author since Tolkien himself. 'The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant' are a must read for any fantasy enthusiast. I'm thoroughly enjoying 'A Game of Thrones', the first part of George R.R. Martin's 'A Song of Ice and Fire' series at the moment - it comes highly recommended.

That's where my money is, anyhoo.
 

Lythandyl

Member
Ah, yes, A Game of Thrones. Such a great book, definitely fully original story and characters. I'll add that to the list.

I'm afraid I'm not familiar with the other authors, but will check them out immediately. Thanks a lot.

As far David Eddings being mundane, as you so put it, I guess it's a matter of opinion. I personally like the world he presented, and the characters were most certainly interesting, at least from my point of view.
 

A_MacLaren

Senior Member
Stupid David Eddings.
I recommend Steven Erikson. Only the first book of his Malazan Book of the Fallen Series is available in America, though.
 
W

WelderX

I recommend Robert Jordan, his Wheel of Time series are very nice reads, I haven't read any of his other books so I can't say anything else but based on the Wheel of Time series I bet that his others are very exceptional.
 
B

babylily

I recommend Kelley Armstrong. I am currently reading Industrial Magic by her and it's great!
 

Ham

Senior Member
A_MacLaren said:
Stupid David Eddings.
I recommend Steven Erikson. Only the first book of his Malazan Book of the Fallen Series is available in America, though.

The Canadians are the best thing going in fantasy lit today. (Except for maybe GRR Martin, who resides I-don't-know-where.) Erikson is great, R. Scott Bakker is every bit as good, and Guy Gavriel Kay is flat out amazing. For my dollar, Kay is the only mainstream fantasist who can hold a candle to the literary quality of the best non-genre writers. His prose dazzles, and he actually brings the tricks of literary fiction to bear on his stories, rather than making them plot-driven monsters like 99% of speculative fiction. Tigana and Lions of Al-Rassan are the two best single-volume fantasies I've ever read.

Also, I think Mervyn Peake deserves a mention. He was more or less contemporary with Tolkien, and though his world was much smaller, and not nearly as deeply researched and thorough, his prose put Tolkien's to shame and then some. Peake's Titus Groan (Gormenghast) books are like the midpoint between Tolkien and Dickens. Brilliant, beautiful, elegant stuff.
 

Capulet

Senior Member
Michael Moorcock and the entire Eternal Champion saga. If you find you like his writing style, he has about 20 or so books that all string together to form the series.

Lin Carter's Thongor series is a great read if you're into the old Conan "barbarian meets wizard barbarian beats wizard" style of serials.

The Wizard War series by Hugh Cook. Some people say it gets a little dry as you go on, but it's worth it for the first book alone.

John Norman's Gor series. Hugely successful, and with a rich cultural texture to the series.

There you go, a trip into the archives for all you people stuck on books printed in 1990+ :p
 

ThiNnlinG

Member
I would quickly reccomend Robert Silverberg and his Majipoor series, Ursula K. Leguin and the Earthsea trilogy, and as far as David Eddings is concerned, I can understand how some might take him to be boring. But the fact of the matter is that he attempted a goal of working his characters off of eachother. The Belagariad and the Mallorean is a great combo of books where he shows great strengths in his character development. Also there is Paula Volsky. Her ideas and stories are truly unique, but her word usage may be a little too much at times.
 

Capulet

Senior Member
lisajane said:
Cory Daniells, 'The T'En Series'. The only fantasy series (a triology) and book I've ever liked.

You've only found one book you've ever liked? You have pretty discriminating tastes.
 

Dragonscales

Senior Member
Raymond E Feist

I'm suprised nobody has mentioned him yet. His Magician series is one of the best I have read in a long while.
 

Capulet

Senior Member
I've got one of his books sitting on my shelf, can't remember which. I remember enjoying it though...
 

A_MacLaren

Senior Member
Ugh...Raymond Feist...
Cecilia Dart-Thorton's Bitterbynde trilogy is good, though I'm hearing less than great things about The Iron Tree.
 

Jiieden

Senior Member
China Mieville.

He wrote Perdido Street Station, The Scar and Iron Council, set in a fantasy world. The prose is absolutely amazing and the creativity is clearly boiling over in his head - his world looks nothing like Tolkien...
 

lisajane

Senior Member
Capulet said:
You've only found one book you've ever liked? You have pretty discriminating tastes.

I said that it's the only fantasy series and book I've ever liked. I mean that to be the only fantasy book I've ever liked.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top