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Prompts and word games chat (1 Viewer)

Olly Buckle

Mentor
Patron
I am sorry, I lost my sense of humour at a charity dinner, I took it out and left it on the side plate while I was getting free some peanut that had stuck under my denture. the waitress must have been wearing a cloak of invisibility, usually I am right on these things, but she cleared away the plate with my sense of humour on it without my noticing. It was imperfect, but I miss it, mostly it only worked on ones threes and fives, and hardly ever on twos fours and sixes, it was an odd sense of humour.
 

The Backward OX

WF Veterans
A limerick is a kind of a witty, humorous, or nonsense poem especially one with a strict rhyme scheme (AABBA), which is sometimes obscene with humorous intent. The form can be found in England as of the early years of the 18th century. It was popularized by Edward Lear in the 19th century, although he did not use the term.

The following example of a limerick is of unknown origin:

The limerick packs laughs anatomical
In space that is quite economical,
But the good ones I've seen
So seldom are clean,
And the clean ones so seldom are comical.

The standard form of a limerick is a stanza of five lines, with the first, second and fifth usually rhyming with one another and having three feet of three syllables each; and the shorter third and fourth lines also rhyming with each other, but having only two feet of three syllables each.


A little thought first will always ensure the form is correct.
 
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Olly Buckle

Mentor
Patron
This year's twelfth month will be telling
Is that fire and brimstone I'm smelling?
Should we prepare for the worst
On December 21st?

This really does not work, far too many syllables in lines 3 and 4. December 21st is an abbreviation, but it actually reads 'December the twenty first', seven syllables without the introduction.
 

JustRob

FoWF
WF Veterans
While seeking somewhere to post a passing thought I noticed this sticky thread labelled "Important" languishing here, having seen no activity for well over four years. Why it is still sticking to its claim to be important I do not know, but it is as good a place as any to deposit my post. Indeed maybe it is very apt.

An idea for a poem came to my mind a short while ago, but I seldom write poetry and when I do it is spontaneous, the subject, lines and title all materialising within a couple of minutes and then the whole inspiration is gone. I do not indulge in poetry as a rule and these occasions are just literal flashes in the pan. What then should I do with an idea and a title that flash through my mind without a single line of poetry to accompany them? Where better than this quiet spot to deposit them in case some other person can breathe life into them and indeed the thread itself?

I was thinking about the subject of writing prose at the time and realised that sometimes a writer can commit much time to creating a character only eventually to omit that character from his final work for some reason or other. Surely such an occurrence deserves at least a requiem when readers will otherwise never know of the one that passed by unnoticed. In a way my poem can be regarded as complete, the fitting requiem for an unpublished character possibly being an unwritten poem, but perhaps someone else would like to tackle the task that my imagination has failed to. Here then in its present entirety is my very sad poem.

[size=+1]Requiem for The Unknown Character[/size]​
 

JustRob

FoWF
WF Veterans
Thanks you two. That's probably the mark of a genuine poet, ready to tackle any subject, even a completely vague one, on demand.

Well, maybe this thread can stay sticky a little longer now. Back to my rightful place in the prose then.

Heaven knows
Why I write prose,
But I waste no time
When I write rhyme.

(Conceived just as fast as I could type it, of course.)
 

JustRob

FoWF
WF Veterans
One thing you have done, Rob. Added another word to my knowledge of words that have no known rhyme; requiem.

So although it may be the last word in one sense it isn't likely to be the last word in a poem. What a poetic thought.

P.S.

Here's another one.

She recited Jack's requiem
In a veil wiv a lacy 'em,
But wiv Jack lately dead
She then shacked up wiv Fred,
So Jack's brother shot both of 'em.
 
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Pelwrath

WF Veterans
Question. In prose it's show don't tell; active not passive; etc. What rules of prose apply to poetry? Does poetic license exist and if so what does it allow one to do? Does poetry have it's own unique rules?
 

Olly Buckle

Mentor
Patron
Firstly I would disagree with 'rules', there are techniques which are frequently used and generally effective, but don't rule anything out in prose.

The rules which apply to poetry depend on which sort of poetry; the poetic form. It is worth learning about metrical feet of various sorts as an introduction.
 

thefloridapoet

Senior Member
Olly - it isn't perfect, but one could use a twist and end with "ahem".

However, I can't come up with anymore than that right now. boo me...... would that I would be clever today, but sadly that isn't in the cards
 

Olly Buckle

Mentor
Patron
Question. In prose it's show don't tell; active not passive; etc. What rules of prose apply to poetry? Does poetic license exist and if so what does it allow one to do? Does poetry have it's own unique rules?

The rules are only in your head, as you choose them. If you choose to write a sonnet you abide by certain rules, fourteen lines in iambic pentameters, split into three parts, a particular rhyming scheme, you know the form. However, you can write a poem in any form you choose, it doesn't even have to make sense, look at 'Howl' or 'Jabberwocky'. Same goes for prose, if you want to write a particular type of story you can choose to write in a particular way, or choose to write on a well known theme. But, poetry or prose, these are all choices, not rules.

Looking for overall rules is a good way of adopting other people's restrictions and strangling your creativity; applying your own restrictions can be stimulating. That is why I can start a thread like 'The rules and regulations' denying rules, and also the 'Limerick' thread as a fun introduction to the pleasure of creating in a formal poetic form.
 

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