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Prepositions in a list (1 Viewer)

Travalgar

Senior Member
Alright, this one has been bugging me for a long time. How do we handle different prepositions on a list?

The individual modules can detach from each other and also join with each other.
In the example above, to avoid writing each other twice, I would usually combine them into something like this:
The individual modules can detach and also join with each other.
But that doesn't seem correct, somehow. It suggested that the modules can detach with (which is incorrect) and join with each other. So if I were to rewrite it again, I'd go with:
The individual modules can detach from and also join with each other.
I tried to preserve the preposition from that was attached to detach (no pun intended) in the combined form. I thought this second version would be the most natural-sounding of all three sentences (although, grammatically, all three sentences seems to be actually correct, according to ProWritingAid). What do you think?

Confirmation on this issue would greatly help me tackle other similar issues, especially with lists with a more complex structure. For example:
He was married to her. He hunted bears with her. He carried her to bed sometimes. He stood by her.
How would I shorten the list above into a single sentence (if possible), while avoiding repeating he and her?
 
For the first sentence, I think the second version sounds better and the only thing I would change is I would remove also:
The individual modules can detach from and join with each other.

And for the second sentence, I would do:
He was married to, hunted bears with, sometimes carried to bed, and stood by her.

Or I would try rewording it and do this:
She was the one he was married to, hunted bears bears with, sometimes carried to bed, and stood by.
I hope that helps. It's a really good question by the way.
 

RGS

Senior Member
Personally, I would go with:

The individual modules can detach from and also join each other.

I would remove the "with" entirely, since that's implied.
 
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