Writing Forums

Writing Forums is a privately-owned, community managed writing environment. We provide an unlimited opportunity for writers and poets of all abilities, to share their work and communicate with other writers and creative artists. We offer an experience that is safe, welcoming and friendly, regardless of your level of participation, knowledge or skill. There are several opportunities for writers to exchange tips, engage in discussions about techniques, and grow in your craft. You can also participate in forum competitions that are exciting and helpful in building your skill level. There's so much more for you to explore!

Payoff (1 Viewer)

Status
Not open for further replies.

EternalGreen

Senior Member
-Two people kiss.

-Somebody dies.

-A decision is made.


They artistic value of the situations above is not determined by the execution of the prose; but they are a payoff for earlier writing. No matter how nice your prose is, or how vividly you "show", it's value is still based on a subterranean framework.

Cashing in on this framework you've already established, it would seem, is actually the easy part!

If there's one thing I've learned about about writing recently, it's that it's all about the invisible, the stuff that's beneath the prose--stuff that must be indirectly altered with the pen.
 

TheManx

Senior Member
Well, I hope you or someone explains this in more detail, because I have no idea what you're talking about. :)

Thank you in advance!
 

luckyscars

WF Veterans
-Two people kiss.

-Somebody dies.

-A decision is made.


They artistic value of the situations above is not determined by the execution of the prose; but they are a payoff for earlier writing. No matter how nice your prose is, or how vividly you "show", it's value is still based on a subterranean framework.

Cashing in on this framework you've already established, it would seem, is actually the easy part!

If there's one thing I've learned about about writing recently, it's that it's all about the invisible, the stuff that's beneath the prose--stuff that must be indirectly altered with the pen.

I agree that the climactic events in the story are usually only climactic if they 'fit' with the rest of the story so far.

I'm not totally sure about this idea of 'subterranean framework', though. Can you maybe explain what you are thinking of with that?
 

Lee Messer

Senior Member
It is better to write than not to write. It doesn't really matter what you say at first as the editing will come to flesh out the details (subterranean). Point is, if you stop writing because you don't have all the details worked out, then you have "writer's block". Another way of saying it, "A total worthless waste of time."

I never get writer's block.
 

bazz cargo

Retired Supervisor
Behind the prose there is story, Behind the story there is an idea. Behind the idea is an emotion.
This is something that only works on a subconscious level.

To explore the story there are characters, this is where a writer works.

You have been mad at someone, or sad at something, or laughing at the world. You have an idea that you wish to share. You create the characters who live and die in prose to dig out the subconcious.

You must ignore this. Just write...
 

Lee Messer

Senior Member
I'll try to emulate this method. Let me see if I'm getting this.

It can be done backwards to create poetry, which heavily works at the subconscious, but the words I start with will become profound instead of generalized. I normally don't write poetry though.

You don't understand me.
I love you.
You can't see how much I love you.
I must tell you.

I looked at your face, and my feelings were a combination of sadness, and longing.
I realized that I loved you more than anyone I had known before for with these emotions also came a stronger feeling of happiness, and content.
I also realized at that moment that you were oblivious to me. You were talking only to hear yourself, and know that someone else supportive was listening.
I felt the need to confess to you what I felt I was hiding, The burden was too great to bear.

Then we break it back down, but complete the purpose of the subconscious desire (The Reason for the words to be written)

And when that day comes when you will see, my love is pure and ever free.
Then you will know those crimson tears are flowing deep within me.
I and I would love you for all of time, I love like art a kiss in rhyme.
For these are the kisses writ on my heart, a billion words in just this part.
They all overlooked, but never saw, I love like art... a kiss I draw.

I wrote something like this before, but I can't remember it. I was much younger. It was published anyway, but I can't find it anywhere.
It's the same exercise though.

You just write, and then hash out the details.
Then you polish.
 

TL Murphy

Met3 Member
Staff member
Chief Mentor
- Two people kiss.

-Somebody dies.

-A decision is made.


They artistic value of the situations above is not determined by the execution of the prose; but they are a payoff for earlier writing. No matter how nice your prose is, or how vividly you "show", it's value is still based on a subterranean framework.

Cashing in on this framework you've already established, it would seem, is actually the easy part!

If there's one thing I've learned about about writing recently, it's that it's all about the invisible, the stuff that's beneath the prose--stuff that must be indirectly altered with the pen.

This touches on universal form and I think that is what EmeraldGreen is talking about. Any successful story, novel or poem follows the same universal structure: opening, climax (or turn in poetry, also called the volta), conclusion. It's interesting what Lee says because the above example actually follows this structure better if its order is reversed:

A decision is made
Somebody dies.
Two people kiss.

This is not all that far from haiku, which does the same thing, offeres a slice of life in three lines complete with opening, turn, conclusion.
Essentially, the structure offers a setting or circumstance, a surprize or change of perspective, and then some kind of resolution between the first two parts.

This basic structure is universal across all literature and identifying those divisions is often key to analyzing a story or a poem.
 
Last edited:
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top