Writing Forums

Writing Forums is a privately-owned, community managed writing environment. We provide an unlimited opportunity for writers and poets of all abilities, to share their work and communicate with other writers and creative artists. We offer an experience that is safe, welcoming and friendly, regardless of your level of participation, knowledge or skill. There are several opportunities for writers to exchange tips, engage in discussions about techniques, and grow in your craft. You can also participate in forum competitions that are exciting and helpful in building your skill level. There's so much more for you to explore!

On Writing- Stephen King (1 Viewer)

FollowingShadow

Senior Member
Does it hold water for y'all? I think it's pretty sound advice. Echoes Strunk & White a bit, but I feel Strunk & White are about as salient as you can get. Stephen King is something like Strunk & White in modern practice, in my opinion.

Still, I hear some heavy-handed criticisms. There's no doubting the man's success as an author, or that it took a bit of luck to get there. But as far as craft goes, I hear a lot of people debasing 'On Writing' because they don't like King's style or approach, or maybe they just don't like him period.

So what's the verdict for you? Good book for educating onesself, good read maybe, or shit shoveled from a sitting position?

(Someone might have posted a thread about this, but not since 2006 began. If it exists, it's deeper in the forums than I care to search.)

-FS
 

Turn The Page

Senior Member
It's been while since I read it but I do recall enjoying the book. It was informative and interesting. King was obviously a very motivated kid back in school to be printing and selling his stories to fellow students for their lunch money.
I had only read one of his books before On Writing. Hearts in Atlantis was my first. And I'm into the Dark Tower Series now, which has a very good revised introduction by King that touches on where his ideas for the series originated. Lord of the Rings meets the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly.

As for Strunk and White, that's all fine and proper, but I think it was Ishmael Reed who impressed me with the idea that the story is more important that the grammar.
 

strangedaze

Senior Member
i didnt get far into his coming of age biograpphy jazz, but i really enjoyed the practical 'on writing' sections.
 

Mike C

WF Veterans
I'm basically against 'how to' books, but I'm currently reading 'On Writing' and I'm impressed. He doesn't tell you how to write, but points out the pitfalls. And (unusually, as 'how to' books like to pretend they can make a slik purse out of a sow's ear) King acknowledges that his book will not make you a better writer - crap writers will always be crap. That's refreshing.
 

FollowingShadow

Senior Member
As for Strunk and White, that's all fine and proper, but I think it was Ishmael Reed who impressed me with the idea that the story is more important that the grammar.

S&W definitely stressed grammar and etiquette, but King diverges from them in the latter regard. That's partly why I think 'On Writing' is the perfect accessory and extension of TEoS.
 
Top