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Now to write about... myself (1 Viewer)

Garlith

Member
Hello, all... I wouldn't say I'm new to writing but I am very unpracticed. My imagination is always running, but it's been a very long time since I've put anything on paper or computer.

I've been into roleplaying games (D&D and Pathfinder) as a way to stretch and practice my ability to get into a character's mind, but now I'm itching to get into writing my own stories.

I've always been odd about sharing my writing, since I write mainly for myself, not others, and I'm stuck in a weird mentality where I'm scared to write anything in case someone else sees it when I'm not ready. I can trace this back to my teen years (10 years ago, the last time I ever really wrote) and all I can think about is my friend critiquing everything I wrote without me asking or even wanting to show them. It bothered me to the point where I made up my own writing system so nobody would ever be able to read what I had written. I still use it to this day, but it's a habit I'm trying to break...

I joined this forum in hopes of seeing how others cope and adapt to their insecurities about writing and maybe make some brainstorming friends.
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
What you've got to remember is, 99% of the time people critique work on here because they see it as worth critiquing. To be critiqued, no matter how much it looks as if you've done everything wrong, is a positive thing. It took me three years on writing courses before someone actually critiqued my work and that's what I was there for. Before that is was just 'Very nice, Paul, next,' and I hated that. It taught me nothing. If you want to learn, you have to put yourself out there and take the critique.

And welcome to the forums! :)
 
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Taylor

Staff member
Global Moderator
Your system sounds complicated. You must really have a desire to write if you are willing to put that much effort into it. I think everyone has some insecurities, but the joy of writing can be equaled with others' reading pleasure, so eventually, we learn to let go.

Welcome to the forum!
 

Garlith

Member
What you've got to remember is, 99% of the time people critique work on here because they see it as worth critiquing. To be critiqued, no matter how much it looks as if you've done everything wrong, is a positive thing. It took me three years on writing courses before someone actually critiqued my work and that's what I was there for. Before that is was just 'Very nice, Paul, next,' and I hated that. It taught me nothing. If you want to learn, you have to put yourself out there and take the critique.

And welcome to the forums! :)

I'm definitely open to critique now, haha. Once my nerves settle around the thought of showing someone my work... I suppose I wouldn't call what they did as constructive critiquing, they just called me a thesaurus killer (even when I told them that the particular page I was showing them was practice in using new words in sentences, not actually a committed narrative).

"Very nice, Paul, next," I've see that too often... My friend has me reading some drafts for his own books and I've made sure to put down notes and questions every time my brain has a thought. Even if I don't think it's much, if it gets his mind thinking differently and he's happy with it then we're making progress.

Your system sounds complicated. You must really have a desire to write if you are willing to put that much effort into it. I think everyone has some insecurities, but the joy of writing can be equaled with others' reading pleasure, so eventually, we learn to let go.

Welcome to the forum!

Stories and characters are what get me through every day. I don't know where I'd be without, haha. I can't comprehend how people live without the lifeblood that is drama and adventure (and music).

I very much lean towards the fantasy end of the spectrum with heavy doses of reality. I want to balance the two, but I'm still a bit of a wimp when it comes to tackling sensitive topics.
 
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Lawless

Senior Member
I'm itching to get into writing my own stories.
I'd say go for it.

When a story is on your computer and password-protected, there is obviously little chance that someone will see it when it's not ready yet. And this forum is remarkably friendly compared to the others where I've been. So you found just about the best place available to get feedback from other people.

Looking forward to reading your works.
 

Garlith

Member
I'd say go for it.

When a story is on your computer and password-protected, there is obviously little chance that someone will see it when it's not ready yet. And this forum is remarkably friendly compared to the others where I've been. So you found just about the best place available to get feedback from other people.

Looking forward to reading your works.

True, my computer should be secure. Can't let those anxieties get the best of me, haha.

I turned my little coded language into a custom font. It's sort of a crutch for me right now, but heck, if it'll get me started again then I'll play little mind games with myself if I have to.

Hope to see y'all around the forums once I get more comfortable~
 

Taylor

Staff member
Global Moderator
Stories and characters are what get me through every day. I don't know where I'd be without, haha. I can't comprehend how people live without the lifeblood that is drama and adventure (and music).
I'm exactly the same. Having worked in pragmatic jobs all my life, that's one of the things I love about writing. It's moving up into the upper tier of Maslow's hierarchy of needs.
I very much lean towards the fantasy end of the spectrum with heavy doses of reality. I want to balance the two, but I'm still a bit of a wimp when it comes to tackling sensitive topics.
That intrigues me. My fiction is based on reality. I've never written any fantasy, so I can't speak to it. But when you combine the two, how do you decide what will be fantasy and what will be reality? A fantasy world with realistic themes?
 

Garlith

Member
I'm exactly the same. Having worked in pragmatic jobs all my life, that's one of the things I love about writing. It's moving up into the upper tier of Maslow's hierarchy of needs.

That intrigues me. My fiction is based on reality. I've never written any fantasy, so I can't speak to it. But when you combine the two, how do you decide what will be fantasy and what will be reality? A fantasy world with realistic themes?

The world is fantasy, as in there's magic and monsters, but I try to explain everything down to their basics without overdoing it so that the world is grounded in a way that doesn't feel forced.

I want there to be room for beyond human feats and alien experiences (still deciding on the final medium I desire for some of my work), and I want the danger to be real. I want my world to be exciting and deadly but I also want to give the characters a chance (which can be hard when I tend to give my characters more flaws than anything else, haha).

The best way I balance this so far is to make sure that no matter what happens I don't forget the core humanity in my characters. This is, however, also where I struggle... I want to challenge my characters without breaking them, and without going easy on them, but I'm a weeny when it comes to serious challenges like war, death, suffering of any kind, etc... If I do delve in, it feels a little too real and it makes me more uncomfortable with sharing, haha. Like how could you write something so horrible or taboo for a character?

I do of course love the little nice things that fantasy brings. I have a character who is very morally dark with a bright and sunny outer personality, and even though I know he's a pretty scum person, there's something about doing frivolous acts of fun magic that add a light to him that I don't believe I could see in a non-magical world.

I hope that somewhat answered the question...? I'm not entirely sure how to explain a direct thought so I end up rambling and hope it carries along what I'm trying to say.

Yes though, a fantasy world with realistic themes, haha.
 

Llyralen

Senior Member
I'm interested in your writing system. Sounds really cool.
A bit ago I realized how many problems I was making for myself by avoiding confrontation. I would imagine worse things than what was true. Something I heard Joseph Campbell say "Where you stumble, there lies your treasure. In the cave you fear to enter lies the treasure you seek." So I'm 45 years old and it just was 3 years ago that I took this saying as my creed, as a reason to be brave. It just struck me as my thing to do. This is how I learned that my imagination is worse than people's real opinions. But people's real opinions have a lot of "I don't care" really often involved because they are caring about their own stuff. Think of the books that you love the most-- for me, mine helped form who I am-- do you expect everyone to like them? No... because people like different things. But for you and for someone who will absolutely love your books it could even help form who they are. So it's all worth it. Anyway, you find as you go forward a lot of "don't care" and you start giving a bit of "I don't care... I'm going to do my thing." back at them.

See you around... there might be threads that challenge you to be brave in little baby-step ways. Do it. =)
As for writing about yourself, it would be very interesting to read about a kid who is so worried people will read their stuff that they create a writing system...and then learns to let people read their work.... and it is relatable. We do these over-protective things sometimes and we grow through them and find wisdom and our own hero story.
 

Garlith

Member
I suppose one step in getting over this is sharing it and moving on from it. My friends all know about and have seen my writing system, so it wouldn't hurt to share a bit here, haha. It mostly translates directly to the English alphabet, with a small handful of letters being removed and another handful being added. Writing in this system can really skew my regular writing because my mind will start to confuse the two and mess with my spelling.


Rmx6TBP.jpeg


I have numbers in my system too, but they come less naturally than the letters, so they tend to get forgotten.
 

Llyralen

Senior Member
I suppose one step in getting over this is sharing it and moving on from it. My friends all know about and have seen my writing system, so it wouldn't hurt to share a bit here, haha. It mostly translates directly to the English alphabet, with a small handful of letters being removed and another handful being added. Writing in this system can really skew my regular writing because my mind will start to confuse the two and mess with my spelling.


Rmx6TBP.jpeg


I have numbers in my system too, but they come less naturally than the letters, so they tend to get forgotten.
What a beautiful alphabet! Wow… that’s so cool!!
 

indianroads

Staff member
Global Moderator
Welcome!
I believe the best way to overcome trepidation is to confront it. Writing puts your soul out there for others to criticize, but remember, those critics lack the courage and talent to do what you do. Don't let fear and the words of cowards silence you. Write; put your stories out there, let your voice be heard - there's nothing worse than silence.

When I published my first novel I was terrified. It was an an autobiography about the years I lived on the street as a young teen. Writing it was cathartic, and getting it out there felt good, but I was afraid of being shunned by those that knew me. Turns out that didn't happen. Others related to my story and - and this is the best part - they wanted to know what happened next. So I wrote a second novel.

Since then I've written more books, and am set to publish my ninth in May of next year. Writing can become an addiction (a good one in my view).
 
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