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NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Month (1 Viewer)

SilverMoon

WF Veterans
This month we ban together to dispel the stigma of Mental Illness. It is difficult for me to grasp how that in these modern times people still stand back, some even from their own children, wearing the same old sunglasses blocking the blatant blare of fellow human being's suffering. Persons who never asked for illness and who fear to ask for help simply due to judgment and ignorance.

Link to NAMI Awareness Month. Not lengthily, powerful and informative. Hoping this will inspire dialogue. And for those, like myself, who've fought and fight the battle in mind. Thank you.

https://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions
 
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bdcharles

Wɾ¡ʇ¡∩9
Staff member
Media Manager
The day when mental health disorders are as untaboo as a broken leg will be a great day. The challenge, to my mind, is that such disorders aren't just perceived as being a feature of a person's body, but that they are the person. I had a girlfriend who suffered a severe psychotic episode and the truth is I couldn't handle it. Leaving aside the delusional beliefs and hallucinations and the fact that she didn't stop talking or ever need to sleep, barring a two-second power nap every few days, all of which are basically liveable-with - but by no means easy - once you get your head around them and sort of accommodate them, her personality was so changed that I couldn't shake the notion that she hated me. She certainly acted like it. Which led to thoughts of: well, why am I hanging around? Is she even ill anymore or is this how she is now? And so that was that, and I miss her terribly, and she doesn't know it but she informs a great deal of my writing. I know now that it was the illness talking but at the time, you just feel like there is no point in being there. Staying around robs you of your self-respect, and you have a hard choice to make.

What's my point? I feel like there is no roadmap to becoming comfortable with mental illness. There's lip service, and the occasional fundraiser, and pff, and that's about it. I myself have periodic bouts of anxiety that have absolutely affected - defined - my life, my career, and so on. I am doing okay, don't get me wrong - more than okay, in fact; I need no sympathy, to bomb a little Freddie in there - but without that, things would be vastly different. At my lowest ebbs did I ever feel understood? No, I felt like I was a burden on society, a toxin, that others, no matter how infinitely patient, would be measurably better off if I wasn't around, and that deep inside, they knew it. All this talk of awareness and understanding and reaching out dwindled to nothing in the face of simple evolutionary forces that ask: are you a liability? Do you add anything to the group? If the answer was no to either of these, then as far as I was concerned, the living universe had no use for me whatsoever. The best I could hope for was to be condescended to. I had to make myself socially useful, and that's an ongoing, hard, and bloody battle. I think, if I ever become the million-selling novelist I deserve to be ;) I'd like to go out on the road and workshop some of the ideas that I've had about pulling oneself out of that situation. The only trouble seems to be that they sound hopelessly unpalatable and gauche. And that's just from a fairly mild case.

That's my experience anyway. I hope it is not the same everywhere, and that we make headway. I guess it's better than the old days, where women could reportedly be thrown into asylums for reading novels :)
 

Theglasshouse

WF Veterans
I use to go to Nami in Virginia. I went for therapy and to received free treatment which is all over the united states. It is a charity. I wish there were a program like it near where I live. You share all your private thoughts and people reply back even those who want to learn how to improve their mental and emotional sickness (such as was my case, since I have a mood disorder).

In a developing country, it is difficult to study especially if a person has hallucinations with how people treat you. Which is why online education is my only real choice. People have sympathy because they have it for other things. I believe the internet is a giant playground for misbehavior. People were children before, they can act like that under the circumstances that they like or dislike something. Ask people what they have a heart for. Upfront they will tell you they do not about a certain subject, but in fact their suffering they might sometimes they think is misunderstood. No one knows about mental illness easily unless they have no other choice to do so sadly. Anyways understanding goes hand in hand as emotion is a language. The ones who suffer will be more sympathetic like Aristotle once said. Pain brings understanding. It's my interpretation it brings maturity. Because people know nothing, of what it is like.

Things get used for the wrong reasons these days. People get creative. That is why somethings require empathy. I am currently writing a story in a different direction that intended. That expressed in part those thoughts. I appreciate help, because it is a way of communication. I appreciate people saying good things about people with mental disease. So many things pass through my mind when talking about it.
 

SilverMoon

WF Veterans
Yes, many hear a label and never see the person. And then there's the person who defines themselves by their illness. Relying on a label to withdraw from society or raise holy hell.

I was once that person who for years would say "I'm Bi-Polar". No. They day I got I am a person with this condition was the day I began to take responsibility for my life. The ruin made was not my fault. I was born with a chemical imbalance.

Has anyone heard: Snap out of it? Keep a stiff upper lip? Or the worst ever directed my way "You can't afford the luxury of being depressed". The force of stigmas are fueled by making people feel shame. Think about it. Is this not a form of "bullying?" "You're not like me so you are wrong, a persona non grata" This is precisely why we need to speak up in collective voice. There is power in numbers. And there are many numbers counting down to your garden variety depressive.

And when it comes to mental illness there seems to be no middle ground. We are either demonized as a burden to society or glorified as the genius who contributes to society only at the expense of themselves.

Don't get me started on the media's portrayal of mental illness. It would be futile. You know all about it and am certain you share my ire that we are not all axe murderers. Damn them, yes. But here is the instance of the walking money machines.

bd, I'm sorry you girlfriend never re-bounded from her breakdown but though a difficult choice I feel you made the right one. We cannot sacrifice our own life, the one we fight for - for peace - to another's who is beyond our reach.

gh, I didn't know you come from another country where there is even more of a stigma. Am so glad you've found a way to self educate on-line.

Gotten from a movie I recently watched "We are not the sleeping people in this world".
 

Theglasshouse

WF Veterans
Well, my hallucinations are under control (because of current meds and my doctor)but I fear what may happen (pessimistic by nature on mental disease). That I could get more. Might as well say I am schizo-affective, and experience a lot of anxiety but in social interactions with people. Panic attacks have been prevented but can be triggered I think with fear. I have some compulsive behaviors. I do want to get to become a psychologist. If I pass a board exam I may elevate the standard of treatment people receive and get paid in the process. I wish I could become a psychiatrist but you need real brains and putting a life in my hands makes me uneasy. I am working on the compulsive behaviors. My family is more dysfunctional became of some scenarios which keep hitting the finances. Basically fraud of some sort on us.
 
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Theglasshouse

WF Veterans
Sick mental patients with hallucinations is tough. Once you have hallucinations you enter the spectrum of schizophrenia. But after that I don't know much. There are many types of schizophrenia.
 

Tiashe

Senior Member
Well, my hallucinations are under control (because of current meds and my doctor)but I fear what may happen (pessimistic by nature on mental disease). That I could get more. Might as well say I am schizo-affective, and experience a lot of anxiety but in social interactions with people. Panic attacks have been prevented but can be triggered I think with fear. I have some compulsive behaviors. I do want to get to become a psychologist. If I pass a board exam I may elevate the standard of treatment people receive and get paid in the process. I wish I could become a psychiatrist but you need real brains and putting a life in my hands makes me uneasy. I am working on the compulsive behaviors. My family is more dysfunctional became of some scenarios which keep hitting the finances. Basically fraud of some sort on us.

I had a panic attack last year, and I thought I was dying. .-. Oh, I am also aiming to become a psychologist. But yeah, psychiatrist is a bit difficult since it's a medical position and all.

But regarding awareness, I feel for those students who suffer in school just because their symptoms are not that 'apparent', or that they are not that high of a priority than those who have it more obvious...
 

Ultraroel

Senior Member
A big problem is that mental diseases are being used as a banner to push agenda's nowadays. Self diagnosis is a disease and unfortunately incredible popular. I agree that Mental Illnesses can be incredible crippling, but unfortunately those who are carrying as a bade of honor among their peers are destroying the credibility of those who actually deal and suffer from mental diseases. Instead of taking the taboo off, these people push it into the attention seeking spectrum. Which is a shame for those who are suffering and are scared to ask for help
 

Theglasshouse

WF Veterans
Hello Tiashe. I think the American high school I went to could have done more being depressed. They obviously knew I covered my face. It was labeled with social phobia by a later doctor but wasn't. The teachers were concerned.The psychologist didn't treat me well since I according to her I misbehaved and took it personally and I was just a teenager who didn't know the culture well enough. I had a disability, I wouldn't know until I took some English classes. A lot of people with disabilities drop out of their classes according to research. Then had to leave the country because my parent's bosses decided I should return. And that panic attack is exactly how I feel as well and it begins. And I dropped my depression meds since I switched countries and couldn't follow up on treatment since I didnt know better or my parents.

As for detecting mental disease early it's almost too difficult. It started gradually in high school that I'd cover my face (still don't know why and it happens sometimes). I never asked my doctor what that was during my current visits. Because now the doctor I have is probably the best well-known doctor I can get (comparing the ones we have graduating from universities) that don't have amercian research or from Europe. I don't know if that was both brain damage or autism. I'll never know it seems but felt depressed. And I had a bizarre experience of something illogical happen to me when before high school. As a kid, I couldn't explain the symptoms. Nor knew I had mental disease symptoms. It is intriguing because it implies a lot about a kid's development getting some thoughts considered "delirious" that went undetected before high school.

Hello ulraroel: I agree since it should be the same for everyone else. The best examples of successful people irritate us with mental disease: because people think yes we can, but we can't. But the "banner" for representation for all mental diseases I am aware is unequal. I like equal representation for minorities and mental disease. There's a government that does that. Canada, for instance, has minorities traditionally misrepresented for small groups in other countries to have a voice in the government.
 

midnightpoet

WF Veterans
I've done some self-analysis myself, but of course it's important to discuss these things with your doctor (which reminds me, M.D.'s are not psychiatrists - and it does concern me that a lot of meds are given out by people who probably do not have much training in mental disease).

Of course you've got to wonder if a lot of people think they've got a mental disease simply because they feel bad. I do think that the medical community's approach to mental disease needs work.

Wish everyone a better day.

Tony
 

Theglasshouse

WF Veterans
Right, misread ultraroel: not taking virus vaccines for people to prevent autism. I think it comes from heredity and environmental causes of stress. Not because of the vaccines.
 

SilverMoon

WF Veterans
quote_icon.png
Originally Posted by MidnightPoet and it does concern me that a lot of meds are given out by people who probably do not have much training in mental disease).
and it very strongly concerns me as well. Even PHd's rely on the diagnostic wastebasket. If they can't make heads or tails of a patient's diagnoses they just label them schizophrenic and prescribe neuroleptics.

This happened to my brother. He's never had a psychotic episode but was diagnosed as a schizophrenic and prescribed anti-psychotics. To the diagnostic wastebasket he went.

If anti-psychotics are administered later in age in large doses for a long period of time and especially to those who are even mildly developmentally challenged the likelihood of developing Tartive Dyskenisia is pretty much inevitable. I pleaded with his Phd to take him off the meds but to no avail. My brother now suffers from TD.

TD is a neurological side effect which causes irreversible lower facial twitches, jutting tongue (which limits speech), stimminng - rubbing face and other methods to self-soothing. Hyper-metabolism which renders the person looking anorexic despite high calorie intake. More bizarre symptoms but the worst of all is that these persons have a short life expectancy. I just want to hunt down this doctor and did try but there's the Statute of Limitations. In any case, he was an older man and has passed.

My brother is with me now but just for a month's time. Tuesday he will be returning to Wisconsin where he lives a simple, quite life with few complaints except for people making fun of him. He cannot speak on the phone so I advocate for him long distance.

quote_icon.png
Originally Posted by MidnightPoet I do think that the medical community's approach to mental disease needs work.

Tony, an unequivocal YES.
 
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Theglasshouse

WF Veterans
1 hour for 200 dollars a psychiatric session is bad.Should be 2 hours each time per month for 200. Sad to hear how it happened silvermoon.

I had my share of bad doctor's experiences. One gave me medicine even though he was no psychiatrist and was a psychologist. I bet he may have passed away, and was accused of being a pedophile in the United States for rape, he had no ethics. It's not surprising. He overcharged my parents too for 1000-2000 dollars. My mom and dad were desperate.

I wish you find a good doctor to treat him and that there is a breakthrough.

Go to a middle-aged doctor who has masters in many places and credentials. Like a member here said, a doctor in his or her 40s 50s has a lot more experience. That's what I would do. Make sure your brother now receives the best treatment. The medical system is screwed-up in the United States because doctors must spend more time with patients if they expect to be paid so much.
 

-xXx-

Financial Supporter
i propose the perspective that everyone
has precarious impermanent mental health.

self deception, denial and an infinite ability to rationalize
greet me daily, not one month per year.

and i don't watch television. :)
 

-xXx-

Financial Supporter
i don't know if this is the most appropriate place to post this, but i do feel strongly that it is worth sharing.

one of the things i will be reading/contemplating, etc. this week will be the basic wikipedia information on the Theory of Positive Disintegration by Kazimierz Dąbrowski.

i anticipate the information to be dense enough for me to spend several weeks on different aspects.

i considered doing a blog set, but decided against it.
could be a great focal for discussion.
:)
 

SilverMoon

WF Veterans
I will have to make time and check this out. Sounds fascinating. If you post for discussion please let me know! Laurie
 

Theglasshouse

WF Veterans
That's great if you decide to. I know that would help benefit people on this website. I'd also like to hear your experiences after reading it should you make that choice if you think you will read the book.
 
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