Writing Forums

Writing Forums is a privately-owned, community managed writing environment. We provide an unlimited opportunity for writers and poets of all abilities, to share their work and communicate with other writers and creative artists. We offer an experience that is safe, welcoming and friendly, regardless of your level of participation, knowledge or skill. There are several opportunities for writers to exchange tips, engage in discussions about techniques, and grow in your craft. You can also participate in forum competitions that are exciting and helpful in building your skill level. There's so much more for you to explore!

Must the author pay for usage of photos? (1 Viewer)

Elston

Member
Hello.

I have been offered a contract by a publishing house for a non-fiction history book. As I understand, however, I have to provide 20 images free of charge, as well as for the cover.

Besides the cost of this (a cover photo would cost about $250 and each image around $50 I reckon), I do not understand the legal aspects. For example, I pay the owner of the image, right? But then another entity (the publisher) gets to own the rights to what I have paid for?

I wonder if anyone can tell me what the established traditions is in publishing, because I have never published before.

Thanks in advance to anyone in the know on these things.
 

Taylor

Staff member
Global Moderator
Look online for free and copyright free stock photos.


You know, I always wondered about this issue of using the copyright stock photos. Could there ever be a dispute? You download it from a site that says free for commercial use. And then it doesn't appear again on the site, say and then you have to prove it was listed as free for commercial use. But they could argue that it was only free for commercial use such as advertising, but not for publishing and re-selling. It seems hazardous to have all your books printed without explicit permission from the photographer, not just from Google or a third-party website that may go missing.
 

Elston

Member
Actually, the sort of book that it is, it just would not do to have photos with uncertainty and they need to be twentieth century anyway (so hard to find any without an owner).

But my real question is about the tradition. I have not published before, so I do not know what the tradition is in non-fiction book publishing for a general audience. Is it proper for the author to have to buy the rights to the images, rather than the author suggesting the images and the publisher then paying the owner for the rights?
 

Bloggsworth

WF Veterans
You know, I always wondered about this issue of using the copyright stock photos. Could there ever be a dispute? You download it from a site that says free for commercial use. And then it doesn't appear again on the site, say and then you have to prove it was listed as free for commercial use. But they could argue that it was only free for commercial use such as advertising, but not for publishing and re-selling. It seems hazardous to have all your books printed without explicit permission from the photographer, not just from Google or a third-party website that may go missing.

Take screenshots.
 

Elston

Member
To any judge, ignorance of the law is never an excuse I am afraid!

So... Has anyone been offered a contract when they, as author, need to provide the pictures (meaning either pay OR just choose ones in the public domain)?

The question here is about the wording of the contract.
 

ideasmith

Senior Member
Taylor;[URL="tel:2328025" said:
2328025[/URL]]You know, I always wondered about this issue of using the copyright stock photos. Could there ever be a dispute? You download it from a site that says free for commercial use. And then it doesn't appear again on the site, say and then you have to prove it was listed as free for commercial use. But they could argue that it was only free for commercial use such as advertising, but not for publishing and re-selling. It seems hazardous to have all your books printed without explicit permission from the photographer, not just from Google or a third-party website that may go missing.

Unless you are specifically indemnified, yes, somebody could come after you. You’re relying on that poster actually having the right to extend copyright to you, for one thing, and there may be something in the photo which has protection. The more money you have, the more attractive a target you’d be.
 
Top