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Looking for Adventure Autors and Books (1 Viewer)

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_Koriko_

Senior Member
Hi there! I'm currently writing a adventure novel, and this is a new area for me. I don't normally read adventure, but to make my book better, I think I should read more. Anyone have any writing tips or good adventure books I can read?
if so, I'd be really grateful if you shared them. Thanks!

(P.S:Is anyone here an author who mainly writes adventure? If you are, I would be very interested in what you have to say.)
 

RhythmOvPain

Senior Member
While I'm not too keen on fantasy adventure, I have read a handful of good adventure books.

The Walking Drum by Louis L'amour is one of the best oldschool adventure novels I can think of. Its foundations are cemented in history with a lot of creative license (but no real fantasy).

As a child, I enjoyed reading the Artemis Fowl books. I felt like that was as hardcore as YA fiction could get. Each book is part fantasy/sci-fi/adventure/action/mystery, although the series is aimed at kids up to 14-16.

I'm sure I've read some of the more popular books, but I'm not the type who's willing to sit and read eight novels to figure out how it ends.

EDIT - WOW, they JUST released a memo stating that Disney has begun production of an Artemis Fowl movie 1 day ago at the time I wrote this, and it's scheduled for release in 2019.

http://collider.com/artemis-fowl-production-start-disney/
 

Serra

Senior Member
I know a few children's adventure books.
Enid Blyton was my favourite author for ages, she had a series of books known as the 'Adventure Series'. Then there's 'Swallows and Amazons' by Arthur Ransom, which me and my brothers were always acting out when we were younger.
Have you heard of The Liveship Traders Trilogy by Robin Hobb? Although it does follow two other series, I think they can be read as a lone trilogy. They're large books, but definitely worth the time. It's an adult Fantasy series.
 

Ralph Rotten

Staff member
Media Manager
I could suggest a few adventure books, but you really wanna study the current market. Lookup the NYT best seller list and start there. Those books are what is currently selling, which will tell you what publishers are currently buying.

The market changes like the tide, so look at the current stuff.
 

shouthuzzah

Senior Member
I'm writing a middle-grade adventure/fantasy series and have been reading a ton of recently published books in this genre for inspiration. I'd check out goodreads.com, they release lists of newly published books in specific genres. I've also been utilizing my local library. They have newly published books separated from the rest, so I always browse those.

Specifically and recently, I really enjoyed The Books of Beginning, a trilogyby John Stephens; the "Tuesday McGillycuddy" series by Angelika Banks; and The Sea of Trolls by Nancy Farmer. I also really love Kristen Britain's Green Rider series and anything from Tamora Pierce's Tortall universe.
 

Blackstone

Senior Member
Hi there! I'm currently writing a adventure novel, and this is a new area for me. I don't normally read adventure, but to make my book better, I think I should read more. Anyone have any writing tips or good adventure books I can read?
if so, I'd be really grateful if you shared them. Thanks!

(P.S:Is anyone here an author who mainly writes adventure? If you are, I would be very interested in what you have to say.)

Are you writing YA or adult?

In my opinion great adventure fiction had its heyday in the era before the world had been fully mapped and technology was advanced and before books started focusing less on action and more on character and examining the human condition. A lot of classic adventure novels are extremely two dimensional and works Treasure Island, Around The World In 80 Days, etc. are products of their time.

Adventure is still very popular in a YA and MG context. The Hatchet series by Gary Paulsen, about a boy stranded in the Canadian wilderness with only a hatchet following a plane crash, is a great example of a relatively modern YA adventure story.

In general the genre is vague, even more so than others. A lot of really good adventure stories are strictly speaking hybrids of science fiction or fantasy and often classed as something different. If you are looking for stuff that's more conventional and fairly modern I recommend "The Abominable" by Dan Simmons, "Congo" by Michael Crichton (actually most Michael Crichton is pretty good for adventure), "The Beach" by Alex Garland (not to everybody's taste but definitely an interesting concept and much better than the movie). An author called Clive Cussler is a good place to go for readable modern adventure writing.

If you're asking for examples of great adventure regardless of how old the book is, the 19th and earlier part of the 20th century is where it's at in my opinion. I personally love "The Guns Of Navarone" by Alistair Maclean, which isn't too old and if you're into World War II stuff may be your thing. Jules Verne, Robert Louis Stevenson and Alexander Dumas are all obviously excellent. In terms of quality of prose, the best adventure novelist of all time in my opinion is and probably will always be Jack London.
 

K.S. Crooks

Senior Member
I love the books of Matthew Reilly, in particular his Jack West Jr series and Scarecrow series. For me adventure stories requires a search for an item or person. The seach rins wih things like different locations, puzzles, traps, double-crosses, gains and losses, and chances to be heroic. Another feature I like are maps. A map can be of a region, underground caver, building complex or any other locale. For me a map makes the location feel more real and allows me to think about the route the characters will probably take.
 
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