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Life in the slow lane (1 Viewer)

bobo

Senior Member
Hi Lee,
How are you making those little parchment-like fields, where you're planting your wise words ??
 

LeeC

WF Veterans
Hi Lee,
How are you making those little parchment-like fields, where you're planting your wise words ??

If you mean the burnt canvas background, it's something I created with GIMP. Basically I applied a canvas pattern to a layer, made the edges irregular, and underlaid darker colors, all with a bit of feathering.

BS naturally colors everything brown?

A nice distracting spin old friend, I love it :) Actually brown is a shade of decay, which is the foundation of new life, hopefully with more objective understanding. As with the waters we are poisoning for our progeny, we're also killing what's necessary in the "brown" soil for our species existence. Of course, in our headlong pursuit of material gain we don't stop to consider such trivialities as the world our grandchildren will have to get by in ;-) Another contradiction, relative to the true nature of our "caring" side.

My apologies to France bobo, which was one of the first countries to find fault with the likes of Monsanto.


I am just a leaf. Just a leaf falling from the tree so that a new bud may grow.” ~ Gemma Malley, The Legacy
 

LeeC

WF Veterans
Out this morning to do a bit more at putting up firewood, and thought I’d show off a shirt the wife made me. A woman of many talents.

Wanted to get in more of what needed doing, before the doc chides me again tomorrow not to be doing anything that hurts. My usual reply is, you mean like life?

2017 shirt+wood.jpg
[click to enlarge]

The wife takes a lot of pictures, but is camera shy herself. Years back when the state had me demonstrating wood carving at the Big E (New England states fair) a TV camera crew came around, and she vanished like a ghost.
 
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LeeC

WF Veterans
Found myself in the predicament of needing to turn around to get my canes, but not able to turn around without my canes. Don't suppose it matters much though, in a world where our dedicated politicians are rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic ;-)

Brings to mind all the emphasis on good grammar, in a world where few say what needs to be said for the sake of the world our children will have to get by in, and few want to hear it.
 
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escorial

WF Veterans
Out this morning to do a bit more at putting up firewood, and thought I’d show off a shirt the wife made me. A woman of many talents.

Wanted to get in more of what needed doing, before the doc chides me again tomorrow not to be doing anything that hurts. My usual reply is, you mean like life?

View attachment 18940
[click to enlarge]

The wife takes a lot of pictures, but is camera shy herself. Years back when the state had me demonstrating wood carving at the Big E (New England states fair) a TV camera crew came around, and she vanished like a ghost.

Cool shirt man....camera shy people are rare these days..has she had her fifteen minutes of fame yet...
 

LeeC

WF Veterans
Cool shirt man....camera shy people are rare these days..has she had her fifteen minutes of fame yet...
She's often in seniors golf tournaments these days, and likes seeing her name in the newspaper as a top finisher, but won't allow any pictures of herself. Not as if she's anything to hide. Way back when we first met I had a hard time focusing on her as a person, and to me she hasn't aged ;-) Well maybe ... her tongue has sharpened a smidgin :)
 

Kevin

WF Veterans
Some guy told me to buy the 6th extinction so I did. It came a couple days ago. :) I feel lucky that the local amphibians are still around. Hope they stay.

The new batch of frogs made it to my house, the 3/4 mile from the pond about two weeks ago. I'm going to say it took them about two months from polliwog- outward concentric circles in search of territory. Like ripples from a pond. No - they are ripples from a pond.

They got to have moisture, too. My potted natives have attracted one, at least. Not the toads, though. The toads can go just about anywhere. They travel at night. Find a moist hidey-spot in the day. Probably that's what the frogs do, too - travel at night.
 

LeeC

WF Veterans
Some guy told me to buy the 6th extinction so I did. It came a couple days ago. :) I feel lucky that the local amphibians are still around. Hope they stay.

The new batch of frogs made it to my house, the 3/4 mile from the pond about two weeks ago. I'm going to say it took them about two months from polliwog- outward concentric circles in search of territory. Like ripples from a pond. No - they are ripples from a pond.

They got to have moisture, too. My potted natives have attracted one, at least. Not the toads, though. The toads can go just about anywhere. They travel at night. Find a moist hidey-spot in the day. Probably that's what the frogs do, too - travel at night.
It heartens me to know someone here picked up the book. I thought it was above average writing to make a hard science book interesting. Of course I've been reading such books most of my life to broaden my understanding of the natural world, so I'm not the best judge of the writing. I'd be interested in what you think once you've read all you care to of it.

I'd bet many don't know the concept of extinction wasn't known till around 1700, and it took until the last several decades to realize how much we're contributing to a sixth great extinction.

Anyway, thank you for picking it up to have a look-see.


PS: We've had a good deal of rain this year here in NE, so the pond in my natural garden is overflowing with amphibians, which in turn helps other critters fare better.
 
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LeeC

WF Veterans
I assume mankind is the sixth great extinction. If not, the book is wrong.
Over the span of life on Earth there have been numerous extinction events which altered evolution's path to varying degrees. Of those, there have been five major extinction events that altered evolution's path profoundly, and we are currently in the midst of a sixth great extinction, the Holocene extinction, otherwise referred to as the Anthropocene extinction because it is mainly due to human activity. The current rate of extinction of species is estimated at 100 to 1,000 times higher than natural background rates.

The other five major extinction events are:

The Cretaceous–Paleogene (K–Pg) extinction event, also known as the Cretaceous–Tertiary (K–T) extinction, was a mass extinction of some three-quarters of the plant and animal species on Earth that occurred over a geologically short period of time approximately 66 million years ago. With the exception of some ectothermic species like the leatherback sea turtle and crocodiles, no tetrapods weighing more than 25 kilograms (55 lb) survived. It marked the end of the Cretaceous period and with it, the entire Mesozoic Era, opening the Cenozoic Era that continues today. It is estimated that 75% or more of all species on Earth vanished.

The Triassic–Jurassic extinction event marks the boundary between the Triassic and Jurassic periods, 201.3 million years ago. At least half of the species now known to have been living on Earth at that time became extinct. This event vacated terrestrial ecological niches, allowing the dinosaurs to assume the dominant roles in the Jurassic period.

The Permian–Triassic (P–Tr or P–T) extinction event, colloquially known as the Great Dying, the End-Permian Extinction or the Great Permian Extinction, occurred about 252 million years ago, forming the boundary between the Permian and Triassic geologic periods, as well as the Paleozoic and Mesozoic eras. It is the Earth's most severe known extinction event, with up to 96% of all marine species and 70% of terrestrial vertebrate species becoming extinct. It is the only known mass extinction of insects. Because so much biodiversity was lost, the recovery of life on Earth took significantly longer than after any other extinction event, possibly up to 10 million years.

The Late Devonian extinction occurred about 375–360 million years ago. Overall, 19% of all families and 50% of all genera became extinct. Some consider this extinction to actually be as many as seven distinct events, spread over about 25 million years.

The Ordovician–Silurian extinction events combined, ending around 430 million years ago, are the second-largest of the five major extinction events in Earth's history in terms of percentage of genera that became extinct. Almost all major taxonomic groups were affected during this global extinction event.​


When you stop to think about it, it's amazing how much we've learned, and how little we've learned from such ;-)
 

Jack of all trades

Senior Member
The word "extinction" gets used too often, in my opinion. I was taught that "extinction" means "died out". That fits the dodo bird. It is, however, also used to describe the Neanderthals, yet all but Africans have 70+% Neanderthal genes. I would describe that as merging with another species, much like the polar bears are starting to merge with the grizzlies. And did dinosaurs "die out"? Now it is fairly common knowledge that birds are descended from dinosaurs. That is evolving, not going extinct.

To avoid another argument, I won't be posting on this topic again.
 

LeeC

WF Veterans
The word "extinction" gets used too often, in my opinion. I was taught that "extinction" means "died out". That fits the dodo bird. It is, however, also used to describe the Neanderthals, yet all but Africans have 70+% Neanderthal genes. I would describe that as merging with another species, much like the polar bears are starting to merge with the grizzlies. And did dinosaurs "die out"? Now it is fairly common knowledge that birds are descended from dinosaurs. That is evolving, not going extinct.

To avoid another argument, I won't be posting on this topic again.

No opinionated argument here, but the naiveté of the statements distracts from the facts, so needs to be addressed for the sake of others that might read this. Don't mean to pull an Olly :) but language is a two edged sword.

1) Extinction and evolution are two distinctly different aspects of the natural world.

In biology and ecology, extinction is the end of an organism or of a group of organisms (taxon), normally a species (such as ourselves). The moment of extinction is generally considered to be the death of the last individual of the species, although the capacity to breed and recover may have been lost before this point. Because a species' potential range may be very large, determining this moment is difficult, and is usually done retrospectively. From what we've been able to determine with scientific objectivity, more than 99 percent of all species that ever lived on Earth are estimated to be extinct.

Evolution on the other hand is where species arise through the process of speciation. That is, new varieties of organisms arise and thrive when they are able to find and exploit an ecological niche. Species become extinct when they are no longer able to survive in changing conditions or against superior competition. The relationship between animals and their ecological niches has been firmly established.

Objective consideration of these two aspects leads to understanding how in avariciously decimating the habitat and biodiversity (collectively ecology) we evolved with we are hastening our extinction.

2) The dodo didn't "die out" as the statement might imply in lessening the impact of the event. The extinction of the dodo within less than a century of its discovery called attention to the previously unrecognized problem of human involvement in the disappearance of entire species. Not to imply intent, but this is an example of the spins we put on facts, like #43 changing references of global warming to climate change, to lessen the importance of such. It's sad that we can't seem to get beyond our avariciousness for our own good, and especially for the good of our children who will have to live with the sins of their fathers.

3) I don't know where the statement of "all but Africans have 70+% Neanderthal genes" came from, but in actuality the proportion of Neanderthal-derived ancestry has been estimated to be 1–4% of the Eurasian genome. Prüfer et al. (2013) revised the proportion to an estimated 1.5–2.1%, but Lohse and Frantz (2014) infer an even higher rate of 3.4–7.3%, all nowhere near 70+%. Nor can I see it's relevance, as it's an example of hybird-breeding across species where possible. In any case this has more to do with the evolutionary branching of Homo erectus into Neanderthals and Homo sapiens. One might see relevance in Neanderthals becoming extinct between 40,000 and 24,000 years ago, due in good part to Homo erectus ;-)

4) "... polar bears are starting to merge with the grizzlies" is a distracting spin on understanding the distinctions of extinction and evolution. Polar and brown bears diverged about 400,000 years ago, however, the two species have mated intermittently for all that time, most likely coming into contact with each other during warming periods (like the present), when polar bears were driven onto land and brown bears migrated northward. Polar bears can breed with brown bears to produce fertile grizzly–polar bear hybrids, but rather than indicating that they have only recently diverged, the new evidence suggests more frequent mating has continued over a longer period of time, and thus the two bears remain genetically similar.

5) Another spin is noting the fact that the evolution of birds began in the Jurassic Period, with the earliest birds derived from a clade of theropoda dinosaurs named Paraves. Of course crocodiles and alligators have a similar lineage, which are both relevant to evolution. However, the point that is diminished is that commonly extinction is a harbinger of evolution. Dinosaurs are a diverse group of reptiles of the clade Dinosauria that first appeared during the Triassic period between 231 and 243 million years ago. They became the dominant terrestrial vertebrates after the Triassic–Jurassic extinction event 201 million years ago. Their dominance continued through the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods and ended when the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event led to the extinction of most dinosaur groups 66 million years ago.

To follow such reasoning one might note humans and many other mammals descended from a common ancestor about the size of a small rat from 75 to 125 million years ago. While mice and humans certainly don't look much the same these days, their genetic blueprints are startlingly similar with over 90% correlative genes. Something I was thinking when I quoted a snippet from "The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History" by Elizabeth Kolbert:

"The Sixth Extinction will continue to determine the course of life long after everything people have written and painted and built has been ground into dust and giant rats have— or have not— inherited the earth."

Maybe reading this book at a minimum to understand the hard science better would help one get their ducks (or rats) in a row ;-)
 

LeeC

WF Veterans
When you write 'Life In the Slow Lane,' you really mean it, sixty million year old news. Wow!\\:D/
Yes BC, you could say it’s sixty million year (plus) old news, but the irony is that the intelligent species we claim to be only started putting the pieces together correctly in the last two hundred years ;-)

The concept of extinction (which every child supposedly now knows in playing with their dinosaur figures) didn’t arise until April of 1796, when it was put forth in a public lecture by Jean-Léopold-Nicolas-Frédéric Cuvier, a naturalist at Paris’s Museum of Natural History.

The word “fossil” was perviously used to describe anything dug up from the ground. When Carl Linnaeus introduced his system of binomial nomenclature (around 1735 I believe), he made no distinction between the living and the dead (extant and extinct) because, in his view, none was required.

I find it humorous that it took someone in revolutionary France to put forth the obvious. One might see the event as part of the age old struggle between the alternate reality crowd and objective scientific discovery. There was resistance to the idea in the UK and elsewhere, given religious influence and dogmatic education. Even today, with exponentially more evidence and more objective scientists, there is obviously still resistance, especially from the excessively materialistic inculcated.

Gotta get back to my illustrating.
 

JustRob

FoWF
WF Veterans
Actually intelligence, in the form of a brain and central nervous system, was already around six hundred million years ago, not just sixty. That's why it amuses me that in those last two hundred years mankind has also pretty much decided that the brain cannot break the time barrier even though neurons have had hundreds of millions of years to work out how to do it. Evolution experiments with every form of survival technique and has tried many apparently bizarre things that have failed over that vast period. For scientists to believe that they have it all worked out in a blink of the universe's eye seems laughable. When a few humans try things that seem bizarre nowadays other more conformist types laugh at them, but maybe the joke is on them. Whatever mankind tries, it usually finds that nature has already done it. Therefore it seems likely that there are still things that nature does that mankind hasn't tried with any success yet.

Some science doesn't have immediately obvious applications, so isn't pursued by mankind, especially if the chance of success seems remote. In contrast evolution has always indulged in slow lane science, long term experiments with low probabilities of success, such as species that have survived for much longer than humans but then become extinct. Evolutionary superiority may only need a tiny advantage that can't be assessed in a short time. In comparison human science has been a hasty process, cherry picking the more obvious benefits.

For example, I find it frustrating that researchers have identified that human thought processes are analogous to processes in quantum computing, but neuroscientists are still reticent to investigate whether they actually are quantum computational mechanisms. They are still deterred by the risks regarding reputation, success and application that our hasty human society avoids. Instead scientists are focussing on developing electronic quantum computers, which could possibly become superior to humans and make our fears of the future a reality. Personally I would prefer to verify that evolution has already incorporated the same abilities into human brains to make that situation unlikely before giving them to machines.

What I find amusing about quantum computers is that it has been noticed that sometimes they perform no faster than conventional ones. I think this makes sense as they apparently consider every possibility while looking for the answer to a problem. In that case they must consider the possibility that they aren't capable of quantum computing, so must work conventionally. In other words they may prove to be as susceptible to self-doubt as humans are, so the analogy between quantum computers and their human equivalents continues. How ironic (and reassuring) that the ultimate computer could be as unaware of its true potential as we humans may be of ours. So, even quantum computers may spend part of their lives in the slow lane.
 

escorial

WF Veterans
I'm thinking of building an ark and put two of everything I like in it....if you would like to donate any from the list please pm me before extinction

Ferrari
Gold bath taps
moet champagne(magnum size)

fill in rest later
 

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