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life altering books... (1 Viewer)

strangedaze

Senior Member
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey
The World According to Garp by John Irving
Barney's Version by Mordecai Richler

:)
 

A_MacLaren

Senior Member
The Lord of the Rings, because I can't deny how nerdy I am.
The Light Fantastic, because it was the first Discworld book I read, and they got me through highschool in relatively high spirits.
The Lady in the Lake, by Raymond Chandler, because it showed me that not all noir is neo-noir.
The Virgin Suicides, by Jeffrey Eugenides, because it's the best book about death and grief that I've ever read.
 

Avarice

Senior Member
American Psycho - Bret Easton Ellis

A very dark yet partially humourous look at utter obsession with materialism and money and how it can lead to a loss of self.
 

Lorlie

Senior Member
I know I have said this one before,. BUT
The lovely Bones,. By Alice Sebold.
It made me less afraid of death, and made me think of those I have lost in a different way,.
 

kalibantre

Senior Member
Mark Billingham's Sleepy head.

I now hate the thought of people touching my neck, and can't have anyone say night night sleepy head. My dad did it when I had the mumps and I burst into tears...
 
Madam Bovary by Gustav [SIZE=-1]Flauber. I don't know why but theres something great about it.
Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. One of the best books ever written.


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strangedaze

Senior Member
Avarice, I keep forgetting that you rock most assuredly, until you say things like that. BEE rocks my socks in a swirl of coke.
 
G

gir

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho.

Also:

Blindness, by Jose Saramago
Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal by Christopher Moore (this helped me eradicate my somewhat deep-seated distaste for Christianity).
The Giver/Gathering Blue/The Messenger by Lois Lowry. I'm a kid at heart, what can I say.
Slaughterhouse Five I really enjoyed, as well as Catch-22. I loved the humor in both.
Also, the typical 1984, by George Orwell. I read this book the first time when I was about 8 years old, and I've read it every year since then. Every time I read it, I get more out of it.
 
J

j_blades

gir said:
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho.

Also:

Blindness, by Jose Saramago
Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal by Christopher Moore (this helped me eradicate my somewhat deep-seated distaste for Christianity).
The Giver/Gathering Blue/The Messenger by Lois Lowry. I'm a kid at heart, what can I say.
Slaughterhouse Five I really enjoyed, as well as Catch-22. I loved the humor in both.
Also, the typical 1984, by George Orwell. I read this book the first time when I was about 8 years old, and I've read it every year since then. Every time I read it, I get more out of it.
4 of the books you listed are my favorites- catch 22, slaughterhouse 5, 1984, and the alchemist... the first three really add to one's perception of reality and life... the alchemist gives some hope! but i'll add another

J.D. Salinger- 9 stories
One of the best collections of short stories I've ever read... full or originality and it leaves you dreaming about the characters.
 

Syren

Senior Member
Watership +1

The Hagakure, Yamamoto Tsunetomo
Where White Men Fear to Tread: Autobiography of Russel Means
Where the Red Fern Grows, Wilson Rawls
 

Anguirus2005

Senior Member
Altared Carbon

Essentially was the book that made me want to write, dark, gritty, noir in a fascinating sci-fi universe, plus I just love a good anti-hero.

Harry Potter

At the age of 9 that was the book that actually got me interested in reading. At this point I am only still reading the series due to momentum... I figure if I started the series I should finish it...
 
The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros. It's a very quick and easy read, and it has an intriguing story told through a series of short vignettes. The figurative language is like none I've ever seen. Just awe-inspiring imagery, similes, etc. The unique style of the author keeps it entertaining. Overall, it's not life-changing, but more than pleasant.
 

Hodge

pliable
Senior Member
1984 - George Orwell
Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
Watership Down - Richard Adams
Stranger in a Strange Land - Robert A. Heinlein
 

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