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Kafka's Metamorphasis (1 Viewer)

semtecks

Senior Member
I just read this book and . . . wow. I never thought I would actually LIKE a piece of classic literature -- I read classic lit with a feeling of inevitability -- but I LOVED this. It taps into something that's still felt today. This book could IMHO live forever.

I think everybody should read this. It should be compulsory that everyone who calls themself a writer should read this.

I'm off now, to find more work by this author.
 

strangedaze

Senior Member
His shorter works rock and The Trial is dreamy. If you can find the complete short stories by Schocken, treat yourself to them. Most large chains carry it.
 
O

obscurantist

Kafka and Imaginary Animals

Don't you think that there is a close connection between Kafka and Imaginary animals. Imaginary animals appear very prominently in his other stories too, like: Cares of a Family Man, Blumfeld: An elderly Bachelor etc. More to read on this Click here :scratch:
 

Mike C

WF Veterans
It's funny how 'the classics' can put people off, as if they were one homogenous mass of impenetrable wordiness.

If you want to read accessible classics, I'd recommend The short stories of De Maupassant (if you write short stories, you HAVE to read them - he helped to define the modern short story and all his themes are totally relevant to today) and Candide by Voltaire. It was the first book to be simultanously published in every country in Europe, and the first to be simultaneously banned in every country except Britain. It's easy to read and fun, and a wonderfully biting satire that everyone can relate to.
 

semtecks

Senior Member
Maupassant? Did he write the masque of the red death? Or was that Lovecraft?

Anyway, it's not the wordiness that turns me off, it's just that a lot of classic fiction is just that stuffy. But I have read a lot of Lovecraft's shorts, and Arthur Conan Doyle (not the Sherlock Holmes stuff).
 

strangedaze

Senior Member
Guy contracted syphillus and his work took a decidedly nightmarish turn, with insanity being an obvious motif. thank you.

- bill nye the science guy
 

ross

Senior Member
Yeah I agree they can be stuffy. Maybe they date with the language of the time?
I got completely worn down by first Tess of the D'Urbervilles (which I finished) and then Middlemarch during which I almost lost the will to live.

Having said that, Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men; Hemmingway's The Old Man and the Sea; Heller's Catch 22 I loved - even if it was convoluted; Orwell's 1984; and Seb Fawlkes' Birdsong... well I loved them all.
 

semtecks

Senior Member
Having said that, Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men; Hemmingway's The Old Man and the Sea; Heller's Catch 22 I loved - even if it was convoluted; Orwell's 1984; and Seb Fawlkes' Birdsong... well I loved them all.

I'll second that. But they're not what I define as classics -- for no other reason than they're not old enough. They would be in the "depression era" or "post/pre war" category
 

ross

Senior Member
Yeah I see your point. Maybe it's a language thing. Some of the phrasing really does date.
 

Mike C

WF Veterans
Masque of the red wossname was Poe, if I remember rightly.

De Maupassant is not at all stuffy. Read him! If nothing else find 'Boule de Suiffe' online and read it. It'll take you 20 minutes.
 

semtecks

Senior Member
I will. I've already got quite a backlog of classic fiction on my hard drive (halfway through HeartOf Darkness; just read G.G's The Destructors today), I'll check it out and tell you what think.
 

Pacze Moj

Member
Kafka fans might be interested in The Diaries of Franz Kafka, an online project located here:

http://www.metameat.net/kafka/index.php?en

Also, contemporary composer Max Richter has an album called The Blue Notebooks that's inspired by Kafka's The Blue Octavo Notebooks. It's a great listen; very moody. Actress Tilda Swinton does the narration.
 
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