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jumping around (1 Viewer)

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charles003434

Senior Member
Does anybody else jump around in writing? I get inspired to write various scenes in my unpublished books. These are harldy put in chronolgical order. I like to go back and fill in the gaps later. Does anybody else do this?
 

KeganThompson

Staff member
Board Moderator
I am new to writing and I am in the awful l middle of my novel. I have been watching a Youtuber who is a traditionally published author, she doesn't do that but she said it's a way to get through the drafting process and knows other authors jump around. It's not uncommon and I was considering doing that to help push me in through the middle of my draft. When I think of a story, I think of scenes in my head but sometimes I have a hard time figuring out where they should go and what order they go in. Do you put the scenes in chronological order then fill in the gaps? I'm interested in hearing your process :)
 

charles003434

Senior Member
I have been trying to go in chronological order but inspiration hits me at different times. I will change my style to not be in chronological order.
 

vranger

Staff member
Supervisor
I've never jumped around. I write it straight through from start to finish. I'd be concerned that, having "written the future", I might accidentally incorporate that into earlier content and produce continuity errors. I might have an idea for a future scene, but I don't write it until I get to where it goes--I just remember it until that time.

Rarely, I might move a scene forward (in revision) if I think I've got too much exposition at the start and need to inject more action, but that's as far as it goes.
 

Turnbull

Senior Member
I don't think there's any set, objectively best way to write, but going out of order isn't generally a good idea, I don't think. The thing is, we go out of order a lot of times because some scenes are more interesting to write, and as a result we can neglect the less interesting scenes, rather than adapting them to make them better. Writing notes on future bits is important, but going in order can make you feel more accomplished. Like, you can publish a completed story that isn't finished as either a short story or as a part one of a series, but you can't generally publish random fragments.

That said, I don't know your writing process. Maybe for some people this just works better. Or maybe there's a time when you need to take a break from the main part of the story to refresh yourself on why you wanted to write the in the first place. Generally, though, it just seems a way to get tangled and lose a sense of progress.
 

Mark Twain't

Staff member
Board Moderator
I've never jumped around. I write it straight through from start to finish. I'd be concerned that, having "written the future", I might accidentally incorporate that into earlier content and produce continuity errors. I might have an idea for a future scene, but I don't write it until I get to where it goes--I just remember it until that time.

Rarely, I might move a scene forward (in revision) if I think I've got too much exposition at the start and need to inject more action, but that's as far as it goes.
I do tend to end up having to go back through previous scenes to correct any continuity errors but, if I don't put ideas down on 'paper' straight away, I lose impetus so it's a price I'm willing to pay.
 

indianroads

Staff member
Global Moderator
Does anybody else jump around in writing? I get inspired to write various scenes in my unpublished books. These are harldy put in chronolgical order. I like to go back and fill in the gaps later. Does anybody else do this?
Any writing you do is good. If your mind can handle jumping from project to project, I say go for it.
I need to maintain momentum though, and will only switch projects when I’m between drafts or edits.
Just keep doing what works for you.
 

MooreMom523

Senior Member
What I tend to do is if I get an idea for a future scene that is really inspiring, I jot down just random bits and pieces of notes to help me recall it. That way I can think of how it may fit into the flow of things and when/if I build to that scene I already have a skeleton of my inspired ideas.
 
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TheChristianWitness

Senior Member
I don't think there's any set, objectively best way to write, but going out of order isn't generally a good idea, I don't think. The thing is, we go out of order a lot of times because some scenes are more interesting to write, and as a result we can neglect the less interesting scenes, rather than adapting them to make them better. Writing notes on future bits is important, but going in order can make you feel more accomplished. Like, you can publish a completed story that isn't finished as either a short story or as a part one of a series, but you can't generally publish random fragments.

That said, I don't know your writing process. Maybe for some people this just works better. Or maybe there's a time when you need to take a break from the main part of the story to refresh yourself on why you wanted to write the in the first place. Generally, though, it just seems a way to get tangled and lose a sense of progress.
I think that's true. It's better to outline future scenes and take brief notes in advance than to write them completely ahead of time. If you do it the "random" way, you are allowing yourself less room for creativity in those "boring middle parts" that need creativity to make them not boring anyway. By the way, here's something to keep in mind. If you are bored when writing a certain part of your story, so will your readers be bored when reading it.
 
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