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I've Been Defining Gerunds Completely Wrong! (1 Viewer)

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Sinister

Senior Member
Technically, her first example could be diagrammed where "Drinking" was, again, an adjective. That's how I initially read it. Cause I'm weird. lol
But yeah, love Gerunds. The English language is such a beautiful mess.

-Sin.
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
Technically, her first example could be diagrammed where "Drinking" was, again, an adjective. That's how I initially read it. Cause I'm weird. lol
But yeah, love Gerunds. The English language is such a beautiful mess.

-Sin.
I honestly thought 'gerunds' were just words ending with 'ing'. I'll still look for ways of cutting them down because it often softens what needs to be sharp or blunt, but now at least I know why some feel more acceptable than others. How many times have I used the word 'gerund' incorrectly. OH THE EMBARRASSMENT!
 

Sinister

Senior Member
Well, using Gerunds can contribute to passive voice, or at least is comorbid with passive voice. That tends to soften and slow, so far as I can tell. Which is okay, imho, so long as you're using it deliberately. I do find that it's one of my bad habits. I've taken a lot of time lately to try and simplify my prose.

-Sin
 
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TheMightyAz

Mentor
I also found this explanation useful
Yeah, I've been going through this series. It's clearly for beginners and some may find it patronising, but that's doesn't bother me at all. It makes it much easier to understand and I need that!

edit: Oh, that's a different series. I'll take a look at that too.
 

PiP

Staff member
Co-Owner
I think this video is aimed at teaching English as a second language which for new writers could be useful as it SO simple to understand. Haha... YouTube probably picked up my Portuguese IP address LoL ... but I'm not proud
Going right back to basics is great especially for an old dinosaur like myself who left school aeons ago
 

Phil Istine

WF Veterans
I think this video is aimed at teaching English as a second language which for new writers could be useful as it SO simple to understand. Haha... YouTube probably picked up my Portuguese IP address LoL ... but I'm not proud
Going right back to basics is great especially for an old dinosaur like myself who left school aeons ago
I was thinking it's aimed at EASL people as well, particularly as one part of the second video addresses something that a native English speaker wouldn't be concerned about - specifically, "I hate travelling" and "I hate to travel in winter". Although the second part becomes "to travel", I reckon no native speaker would be bothered either way. To use "travelling" for both is probably the way the language is evolving.
 

PiP

Staff member
Co-Owner
speaker wouldn't be concerned about - specifically, "I hate travelling" and "I hate to travel in winter". Although the second part becomes "to travel", I reckon no native speaker would be bothered either way. To use "travelling" for both is probably the way the language is evolving.
so I hate travelling in winter as opposed to I hate to travel in winter.

I like swimming in the sea or I only like to swim in the sea when the weather is warm. Or I like to swim in the sea in summer.
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
This is another useful vid. I think it's worth checking them all out to be honest. Even if I know the rule, it's always nice to have it re-cemented and sometimes there's an element you might have overlooked or forgotten:

 

Phil Istine

WF Veterans
so I hate travelling in winter as opposed to I hate to travel in winter.
The "to travel" version may well be the technically correct one, but I reckon only an EASL or a speaker of higher English would be concerned about insisting on "to travel".
 

PiP

Staff member
Co-Owner
The "to travel" version may well be the technically correct one, but I reckon only an EASL or a speaker of higher English would be concerned about insisting on "to travel".
But what about the written word, would that differ from spoken English when writing a novel?
 

KeganThompson

Senior Member
Something else to think about while I write lol. English 🙄
I've never heard of a gerund, but who knows, at least no enough to remember what it is. Maybe 7th-grade English told me once 🤷‍♀️
 

Megan Pearson

Senior Member
I was wondering, Could it be a state of being? If so, then noun. Right?
'How surprisingly tantalizing.'
:p

But I have been somewhat bothered by whether or not an independent -ING word by itself could be a gerund. Doesn't 'Surprising' lack a direct object? (I don't know whether or not a direct object can be implied [ack-thus making it indirect??]. Yet, doesn't 'Surprising' imply a self-reflective statement of being where I am the direct object?)

BTW, I found that Purdue's Owl website has some nice example sentences for several forms of the Gerund. They seem to be everywhere!
 
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