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Is the villain explaining the plot to the hero, believable ever? (1 Viewer)

ironpony

Senior Member
I want the main character to figure out what really happened in the villains plan. It's a crime thriller and the main character is a cop. But I don't think he could really figure it out as he was not there, when the villains executed the plan and he's not psychic.

Other readers suggested to me to just have the villain explain it to him, but I find it hard to believe that a criminal would ever do that to a cop. Since it's a screenplay, I tend to use movies as examples. Here's an example of the villain explaining the plan to the MC.


But is it really believable that a villain would bother to do that, or what's the point, other than it helps explains things for the MC?
 

Phil Istine

WF Veterans
It does happen sometimes in films like those Bond movies and B-movies, but not until the villain believes he has an unbeatable position. I suppose it's about the villain being able to gloat while seeing the hero's reaction. It's also a device to explain the plot to viewers as an info dump, so possibly a symptom of substandard writing.
 

Matchu

Senior Member
NEW MONOLOGUE IN PROGRESS TEMPLATE

'This goolie-slicer, patented, placed upon this table at my disposals. Heh heh heh. Isn't she magnificent?

[IMAGE: the tik-tok of goolie slicer upon a coffee table + music]

German engineering. I shall watch you lowered...

[Bond suspended from ceiling, anxiety, smiles]

...your ankles and your hands bound above your head.

I shall observe the mechanism

and poker arising to music of Erika,
ja...for your total humiliations.
The annihilation of mister Bond.
Finally, and being as you are about to die, the buttocks descend in red shorts, heh heh heh, yes, that's right, no underpants, heh heh heh, all part of draftwerk, I might as well describe plans, as you swing. Balls are kalt, nein? [evil plus 1]

...Ze world domination, destructions of the superpowers, the corralling of all beautiful ladies of the vorld into my underground bedroom, such a pretty bedroom.

Bond, prepare to die, right now is death, are you ready?

Where is the remote control for this apparatus? Ach, dammit, dropped into the piranha bowl, bollocks. Ow, ow, ow, ow, guards, guards...nein, nichts!'

[Peow, peow peow peow....]

'Naggggghhhhhhhhhhhhhh!'
 

Darkkin

WF Veterans
The term you are looking for is monologuing. And it has gotten to the point where it is a running joke. The Incredibles illustrates the pitfalls of the monologue...Your bad guy has to be glaringly inept if he's monologuing. Disney movies point out this flaw.

Seriously, what villian worth their salt actually has time to explain to a protagonist why their plan is amazing? All the while hero guy is preparing for the blow that will strike BG down simply because he is distracted by his own yammering.

Google Top 100 Things I Would Do If I Ever Became an Evil Overlord.

This list highlights and explains all the pitfalls and surefire defeat scenarios that involve monologuing.
 
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Turnbull

Senior Member
  • the MC finds a letter or diary.
  • The baddie explains something to someone else, and the MC overhears.
  • Someone who is being used in the plot while unawares gives them MC the clue he needs to put it together.
  • A good, ol' fashioned interrogation scene. :D
 

ironpony

Senior Member
Oh okay. Well the bad guys don't really have a reason to explain their plan to each other though, since they have already executed it, and therefore no need to talk about their motivations for it, since they already know. That's what makes an explanation challenging.

As for an interrogation scene, I only want the protagonist to find out the villain's motivation and plan. If the villain is interrogated like in a room with a camera, then others will know too, which I do not want.
 
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Darkkin

WF Veterans
Protagonist making discoveries that solve the crime without the bumbled monologuing of the bad guys is the general working description of a thriller...Context clues that are the catalyst in the scenes. This is where your homework starts. Your piece, you determine the clues and the catalysts.
 

ironpony

Senior Member
Okay thanks. Perhaps the protagonist can figure out the crime for himself. For example, the protagonist is a police officer who is called to a scene and the 911 calls describe a man being chased by other men in masks. The location they came from has the door left open during the chase and the police find a tied up woman there.

Witness saw one of the masked men with a camera while fleeing.

What happened is is that it was a gang initation test gone wrong. The gang of villains wanted a new recruit to do harm to the tied up woman as a test to get in. They were filmming it with a camera so they have leverage over the new recruit just in case. Only he got cold feet and ran. The tied up woman says she doesn't want to say anything or testify or get involved out of fear for her own safety so she is not talking.

But is it possible for the protagonist to figure out that it was a gang initation gone wrong from the clews of masked men chasing a guy from what appears to be a kidnapping scene, with a tied up woman, and one of them fleeing with a camera?

Are those enough clues for the protagonist to figure out what it was?
 

Foxee

Patron
Patron
From the sound of it the bad guys aren't super subtle. There should be some evidence from things that they've actually done.
 

ironpony

Senior Member
Oh okay. When you say there should be evidence from things they have done what the evidence of that crime not count as things that they have done then?
 

Rojack79

Senior Member
NEW MONOLOGUE IN PROGRESS TEMPLATE

'This goolie-slicer, patented, placed upon this table at my disposals. Heh heh heh. Isn't she magnificent?

[IMAGE: the tik-tok of goolie slicer upon a coffee table + music]

German engineering. I shall watch you lowered...

[Bond suspended from ceiling, anxiety, smiles]

...your ankles and your hands bound above your head.

I shall observe the mechanism

and poker arising to music of Erika,
ja...for your total humiliations.
The annihilation of mister Bond.
Finally, and being as you are about to die, the buttocks descend in red shorts, heh heh heh, yes, that's right, no underpants, heh heh heh, all part of draftwerk, I might as well describe plans, as you swing. Balls are kalt, nein? [evil plus 1]

...Ze world domination, destructions of the superpowers, the corralling of all beautiful ladies of the vorld into my underground bedroom, such a pretty bedroom.

Bond, prepare to die, right now is death, are you ready?

Where is the remote control for this apparatus? Ach, dammit, dropped into the piranha bowl, bollocks. Ow, ow, ow, ow, guards, guards...nein, nichts!'

[Peow, peow peow peow....]

'Naggggghhhhhhhhhhhhhh!'
I love this! It sounds like it's actually serious but also a comedy!
 

ironpony

Senior Member
Well I asked a police officer about it and he said that when detectives figure out what happened in a crime, they can't really explain how. It just comes to them like an epiphany and it's the right theory. They just "know". But if I write so it comes like an epiphany to main detective character, the reader isn't going to by that as a logical conclusion are they?
 

Matchu

Senior Member
As long as the judge is happy with the policeman’s epiphany I can’t see issue - save for miscarriage of justice/a broken criminal justice system.

Known as ‘fitting up.’ The most legitimate tool for script-writers - is our classic bent cop.

...as opposed to the rather more legitimate ‘l have a nose for crime, sonny.’
 

ironpony

Senior Member
Oh okay, but even if a judge accepts it, will the reader accept it though, since readers usually do not accept epiphanies or see them as unnatural conclusions, or so I thought.
 
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