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If You Believe In Something (1 Viewer)

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theusedfire5

Senior Member
This is the title of my book in progress. It is essentially a proclamation to all who see that beliefs impact their life regularly.
It covers where beliefs originated, their impact on society, where these beliefs may lead us, and if we were to unify all these beliefs where it would go.
However, I would like to hear from many different people a few beliefs they consider to be the biggest impact on society (i.e. politics, religion, morality). This would assure me that I don't miss any major topics. :roll:
 

The Backward OX

WF Veterans
No, I don't, sorry. However you might do better to search out a philosophy or personal development forum and post your queries there. It's just you may find larger numbers of interested readers on sites like that than you will here.
 

garnerdavis

Senior Member
Is it even possible to have no beliefs? Sure, there are atheists who don't believe in religion; there are people who don't follow politics and don't vote; and there are sociopaths who don't believe in conventional morality. But do any of these groups believe in nothing? Even sociopaths have a belief system: they believe in doing what's good for them, and only them. It's a belief though.

If Theusedfire5 writes a book about people who profess to believe in nothing, I'll bet the stories will end up showing how these people are deluding themselves, and actually believe in something. If he writes the book as a series of such case studies, it might be interesting.
 

theusedfire5

Senior Member
Is it even possible to have no beliefs? Sure, there are atheists who don't believe in religion; there are people who don't follow politics and don't vote; and there are sociopaths who don't believe in conventional morality. But do any of these groups believe in nothing? Even sociopaths have a belief system: they believe in doing what's good for them, and only them. It's a belief though.

If Theusedfire5 writes a book about people who profess to believe in nothing, I'll bet the stories will end up showing how these people are deluding themselves, and actually believe in something. If he writes the book as a series of such case studies, it might be interesting.

You're spot on. Each person is biased to some degree. However, the purpose of my writing is not towards a series, but a proclamation of how we could unify our different beliefs and accelerate our innovating.
I mean atheists for example, may not believe in a deity, but many of them are very strong believers in secularism and the innovation of science.

Although, the idea of people not believing something will be covered briefly for each belief I end up covering; especially in regards to pseudo-intellectuals.

I enjoyed this comment a lot, it definitely made me think of a few things I hadn't before so thank you.
 

theusedfire5

Senior Member
This'd be more interesting, in my opinion.

This will be something I research heavily on in regards to my book. I've always enjoyed knowing exact details for topics for the sake of using that same data for future uses.

Are there any preferable areas you enjoy seeing data for most (i.e. who believes what, how many people have altered their beliefs, etc)?
 

Robert_S

Senior Member
Is it even possible to have no beliefs? Sure, there are atheists who don't believe in religion; there are people who don't follow politics and don't vote; and there are sociopaths who don't believe in conventional morality. But do any of these groups believe in nothing? Even sociopaths have a belief system: they believe in doing what's good for them, and only them. It's a belief though.

You hit it just right. You simply can't have zero beliefs.

I think the closest to a zero belief was in The Restaurant at the End of the Universe, with the Universe controller, the old man living in a shack.
 
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Robdemanc

Senior Member
Interesting idea for a book. I always thought 'The Wicker Man' was about belief and the dangers of belief, especially religious belief. You could also include issues of faith and how faith is represented at various levels. Like: I have faith that today I will be able to get to work on time, to the extreme: I have faith that there is one true god. There is also supposed to be two definitions of belief. 1 - Belief based on proof and belief based on faith.
 

theusedfire5

Senior Member
Interesting idea for a book. I always thought 'The Wicker Man' was about belief and the dangers of belief, especially religious belief. You could also include issues of faith and how faith is represented at various levels. Like: I have faith that today I will be able to get to work on time, to the extreme: I have faith that there is one true god. There is also supposed to be two definitions of belief. 1 - Belief based on proof and belief based on faith.

Great idea! :thumbl:
 

Vertigo

Senior Member
As a guy who's spent a little bit of time just looking over paradigms and whatnot, what strikes me most is the lack of knowledge most people have about their own beliefs. You wouldn't believe how easy it is to pick apart Catholocism with nothing more than a bible, or naturalism with nothing more than my mind and a bit of spare time. Yet those systems are the metaphysical dwelling places of millions, if not billions of people.

Anyway though, might I just say that disbelief is arguably the dominant belief of the world. We're growing every day a more cynical species.
 

Forest Girl

Senior Member
... and if we were to unify all these beliefs where it would go ... (i.e. politics, religion, morality). :roll:

Now there is a scary thought.
I think one of the best things about having free will is the ability to choose what to believe and change those beliefs as experience allows us to grow.
Everyone sharing the same beliefs in religion, politics, etc would narrow our views and I can't see any good coming from that.
In this area, difference is a good thing.
 

Winston

WF Veterans
Faith is a major subplot of my current project. I think I have a successful formula based on the following elements:

1) Approach it cautiously. Even if you have strong opinions, you don't want to alienate the reader.
2) Make the characters likable. Even the ones with an alternate world view. You don't make your belief system better by slamming someone Else's.
3) NEVER try to answer someone's 'life questions'. If you present a compelling case, they answer themselves. Claiming to have final knowledge is the hallmark of narrow minds in search of validation.

My story's main characters are Hindu, Jewish, Christian and Zoroastrian. It wasn't easy, but it was rewarding.
 

theusedfire5

Senior Member
As a guy who's spent a little bit of time just looking over paradigms and whatnot, what strikes me most is the lack of knowledge most people have about their own beliefs. You wouldn't believe how easy it is to pick apart Catholocism with nothing more than a bible, or naturalism with nothing more than my mind and a bit of spare time. Yet those systems are the metaphysical dwelling places of millions, if not billions of people.

Anyway though, might I just say that disbelief is arguably the dominant belief of the world. We're growing every day a more cynical species.

You are very correct, I was actually intending on covering that in a portion of the book. I have always told people, the weakest form of belief is the one you can't explain.

Hmmmm very interesting idea. Are you planning to write an unbiased book or are you beginning with your own beliefs?

As a person who commonly criticized biased organizations or individuals, I would preferably say no. However, as I will bring up in my book all people are biased by at least a little. There is no way to fully eradicate something innate, just merely tune it down.
But, to answer your question, my goal was to be as unbiased as possible. Every person who I have asked to read my drafts, I have emphasized superior criticism to make it the best I can possibly give. I won't be able to cover everything, but I will be covering the most relevant social events pertaining to the chapters subject and explain it in the most thorough way I can.

Now there is a scary thought.
I think one of the best things about having free will is the ability to choose what to believe and change those beliefs as experience allows us to grow.
Everyone sharing the same beliefs in religion, politics, etc would narrow our views and I can't see any good coming from that.
In this area, difference is a good thing.

I'm sorry if you misunderstood me, I suppose the word "unify" was misused. I meant, if every belief was able to accept all the other beliefs.
 
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