Writing Forums

Writing Forums is a privately-owned, community managed writing environment. We provide an unlimited opportunity for writers and poets of all abilities, to share their work and communicate with other writers and creative artists. We offer an experience that is safe, welcoming and friendly, regardless of your level of participation, knowledge or skill. There are several opportunities for writers to exchange tips, engage in discussions about techniques, and grow in your craft. You can also participate in forum competitions that are exciting and helpful in building your skill level. There's so much more for you to explore!

I write only happy endings(because I'm a Rebel :D) (1 Viewer)

JimmyTheAlien

Senior Member
One thing I hate in tv shows/movies and books is a sad ending with no resolution(s)

I suffer from depression and anxiety so it doesn't help me to watch depressing things

if a story starts out depressing but then turns into a miraculous turn around, then okay, that's perfect/beautiful/wonderful

this is why I personally write only happy endings

I think it's important to show people too that good things can and will happen if you believe that they can

we live in a very chaotic culture that sends us mixed signals,

"don't feel angry or sad"

but then all the media is depressing

I think it's time for a change

we need a spiritual revolution in filmmaking

I write stories that I wanna turn into tv shows and movies that will make people feel good spiritually, like their hope has been restored.

I write what I like to call Queer Faith Fiction

stories about LGBT+/Queer characters that get good lives/happy endings

I'd like to see if there are like minded people on here :p
 

vranger

Staff member
Supervisor
There's nothing wrong with a happy ending. The trick is to fool the reader into thinking there is no possible way your climax can be resolved happily, then come up with a clever solution to delight them.

Tragedies are for dramatic purists. Anyone who decries a happy ending just because they think "tragedy is real literature" is an insufferable snob. There is room for both, and the average customer gets tired of tragedy in a BIG hurry.
 

JimmyTheAlien

Senior Member
There's nothing wrong with a happy ending. The trick is to fool the reader into thinking there is no possible way your climax can be resolved happily, then come up with a clever solution to delight them.

Tragedies are for dramatic purists. Anyone who decries a happy ending just because they think "tragedy is real literature" is an insufferable snob. There is room for both, and the average customer gets tired of tragedy in a BIG hurry.
Exactly Buddy 🙏😁💕
 

JBF

Staff member
Board Moderator
There's nothing wrong with a happy ending. The trick is to fool the reader into thinking there is no possible way your climax can be resolved happily, then come up with a clever solution to delight them.

Incidentally, one of the ways to do this is by giving them a happy denouement they didn't expect, either by providing something they didn't know they wanted or letting them out from under the things they thought they wanted. Sometimes they're more content with goalposts that moved than would be the case with their original wants and motivations.

Whatever you do, make them earn it. Nobody likes a good ending that didn't cost.
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
I don't really consider whether my stories end with a happy ending or a unhappy ending, partly because sometimes which is which is subjective in a lot of cases. The only thing I can aim for objectively is a satisfying ending. Surely though, a lot of compromises would have to be made in order to fashion a story that ends happily? If you don't layer in the probability of a happy ending in both the story and character development, having a happy ending would feel artificial.
 

vranger

Staff member
Supervisor
Surely though, a lot of compromises would have to be made in order to fashion a story that ends happily?
Not at all. Some plotting has to be done, maybe some imaginative thinking, but compromise has nothing to do with it.

Happy endings happen in real life just as unhappy endings do. People get sick or injured and recover. Lost pets and children are found safe. Compatible couples realize that state and pair up. They're all over the place. Of course, each one of those also end sadly at times, too, and those events are often successfully included in books which otherwise have a happy ending.

People ridicule "Polyanna" as a story that's too optimistic and too happy. They forget Polyanna fell out of a tree and was paraplegic as the story ended.
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
Not at all. Some plotting has to be done, maybe some imaginative thinking, but compromise has nothing to do with it.

Happy endings happen in real life just as unhappy endings do. People get sick or injured and recover. Lost pets and children are found safe. Compatible couples realize that state and pair up. They're all over the place. Of course, each one of those also end sadly at times, too, and those events are often successfully included in books which otherwise have a happy ending.

People ridicule "Polyanna" as a story that's too optimistic and too happy. They forget Polyanna fell out of a tree and was paraplegic as the story ended.
Maybe this is a plotter versus panser thing. I personally don't know exactly how things are going to turn out. I have points I want to hit along the way but they're only sketched out roughly and in no way restrict any potential journey shifts or character development from point a to point b. It seems to me, aiming for a 'happy ending' is probably the most restrictive plotting rule I could apply. No matter what happens along the way, it all has to end happily ... That would drive me nuts.
 

SueC

Staff member
Senior Mentor
No matter what happens along the way, it all has to end happily ... That would drive me nuts.
Writing stories with happy endings, to me, is not any more difficult than writing sad, tradgedy-laden stories. Unfortunately, we seem to be a society that celebrates the life gone wrong versions in movies and television. But bravo to the OP for taking a different path! It isn't that bad things are not going to happen in such a book, but reflecting on a character that has stamina or grit or whatever it takes to overcome life's hurdles is more enjoyable to read than the alternative. And when you think about it, many beneficial things can come out of tragedies - it all depends on the tools one can use to make that happen. For a personal example, I was divorced by my husband and was left to be a single parent to four children. I had never lived alone before, never even paid bills on my own, didn't even have a job. But I worked hard and feel I was successful in bringing up my kids and in my personal life. It wasn't easy along the way, but I like the person I am now so much more than who I was. I'm the happy ending! :)
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
Writing stories with happy endings, to me, is not any more difficult than writing sad, tradgedy-laden stories. Unfortunately, we seem to be a society that celebrates the life gone wrong versions in movies and television. But bravo to the OP for taking a different path! It isn't that bad things are not going to happen in such a book, but reflecting on a character that has stamina or grit or whatever it takes to overcome life's hurdles is more enjoyable to read than the alternative. And when you think about it, many beneficial things can come out of tragedies - it all depends on the tools one can use to make that happen. For a personal example, I was divorced by my husband and was left to be a single parent to four children. I had never lived alone before, never even paid bills on my own, didn't even have a job. But I worked hard and feel I was successful in bringing up my kids and in my personal life. It wasn't easy along the way, but I like the person I am now so much more than who I was. I'm the happy ending! :)
Yeah, but I don't think about writing a sad ending either. My aim is only to write a satisfying ending. I find it odd that 'happy' or 'sad' can be categorised as 'satisfying' to some people.
 

vranger

Staff member
Supervisor
Maybe this is a plotter versus panser thing. I personally don't know exactly how things are going to turn out. I have points I want to hit along the way but they're only sketched out roughly and in no way restrict any potential journey shifts or character development from point a to point b. It seems to me, aiming for a 'happy ending' is probably the most restrictive plotting rule I could apply. No matter what happens along the way, it all has to end happily ... That would drive me nuts.
Nothing to do with plotter vs. pantser. Even a pantser should have a vague idea of where the story is going to go, what it's about. And possibly you have too narrow an idea of what a "happy ending" is. "Hearts and flowers" is just one of dozens of possibilities. Most common is simply achieving an objective, or survival. Solving a problem is a happy ending. Ripley escaping with the cat even though the rest of the crew died horribly is a happy ending. A detective who solves a murder mystery and puts a character you're fond of under arrest is still, in its way, a happy ending.

And you can have a "happy ending" without a satisfying ending. At the end of my last book, the protagonists have solved their immediate danger, but the suspected source of it is still a mystery. At least two readers so far weren't "satisfied", though they enjoyed the book. LOL But I had to leave a problem for the sequel. ;-) My plotting was not unique. That happens in more series than not.
 

JimmyTheAlien

Senior Member
Happy Endings is one reason I Love to always go back and rewatch the disney movies I grew up watching as a kid
because it has sad things in it but also morals and a happy ending
 

Xander416

Senior Member
Happy Endings is one reason I Love to always go back and rewatch the disney movies I grew up watching as a kid
because it has sad things in it but also morals and a happy ending
Bambi's mother is still dead and the forest he and his friends lived in burned up in a wildfire, Dumbo ended up a prisoner in a circus, and the woman Quasimodo fell in love with ended up with another man. None of those are endings I'd call happy.
 

vranger

Staff member
Supervisor
Bambi's mother is still dead and the forest he and his friends lived in burned up in a wildfire, Dumbo ended up a prisoner in a circus, and the woman Quasimodo fell in love with ended up with another man. None of those are endings I'd call happy.
Yeah, but either you know there are four examples the other way for every one you put up like that, or those are the only three you know about. LOL Don't try so hard to be a spoil sport. ;-)
 

Xander416

Senior Member
Yeah, but either you know there are four examples the other way for every one you put up like that, or those are the only three you know about. LOL Don't try so hard to be a spoil sport. ;-)
101 Dalmatians: It seems pretty straightforwardly happy to see all those little dalmatian puppies escape from Cruella de Vil, but who on earth can take care of over 100 dogs?

Fox and the Hound: Supposed to be about friendship, yet we get to watch the two leads Copper and Tod effectively become enemies.

Coco: Pretty much everyone is already dead from the start of the movie. That's about as depressing as it can get.

The Little Mermaid: What happens to Ariel if her marriage to Eric doesn't work out? Since she can't go home anymore, she stuck living alone among humans.

WALL-E: Would you really want to be among the human population of the Axiom returning to and having to relearn how to live on an earth that's one massive junkyard?
 

vranger

Staff member
Supervisor
101 Dalmatians: It seems pretty straightforwardly happy to see all those little dalmatian puppies escape from Cruella de Vil, but who on earth can take care of over 100 dogs?

Fox and the Hound: Supposed to be about friendship, yet we get to watch the two leads Copper and Tod effectively become enemies.

Coco: Pretty much everyone is already dead from the start of the movie. That's about as depressing as it can get.

The Little Mermaid: What happens to Ariel if her marriage to Eric doesn't work out? Since she can't go home anymore, she stuck living alone among humans.

WALL-E: Would you really want to be among the human population of the Axiom returning to and having to relearn how to live on an earth that's one massive junkyard?
I'm really not going to get involved in debating your silly cherry picking. What happens if something that didn't happen happens after the end of the story? Can you get any more ridiculous with a spurious example? What happens 50 years later when everyone in the story dies of old age? What happens 12 years later when all the Dalmation puppies die of old age? Yeah, you're right. Every story is doomed to tragedy. LOL
 

Xander416

Senior Member
Sleeping Beauty had a happy ending, so did Tarzan, Hercules, 101 Dalmations, list goes on.
Been a while since I saw Tarzan, but I don't recall seeing Nigel again after he jumps off the boat at the end, seemingly implying he drowned and no one noticed. As for Hercules, anyone familiar with the Greek myth knows what eventually happened to Megara and her sons with him.

I don't think I've ever seen Sleeping Beauty.

I'm really not going to get involved in debating your silly cherry picking. What happens if something that didn't happen happens after the end of the story? Can you get any more ridiculous with a spurious example? What happens 50 years later when everyone in the story dies of old age? What happens 12 years later when all the Dalmation puppies die of old age? Yeah, you're right. Every story is doomed to tragedy. LOL
You did kind of challenge me to add more by suggesting those were the only three I knew. Those original three were just the ones that are most depressing to me (especially Hunchback of Notre Dam as I've been there, just without the whole hunchback part). But the Little Mermaid example was a bit of cherry picking, yeah, because it is definitely a "what if" one. The rest are just going on what the movies and their endings left us with.
 

vranger

Staff member
Supervisor
Been a while since I saw Tarzan, but I don't recall seeing Nigel again after he jumps off the boat at the end, seemingly implying he drowned and no one noticed. As for Hercules, anyone familiar with the Greek myth knows what eventually happened to Megara and her sons with him.

I don't think I've ever seen Sleeping Beauty.


You did kind of challenge me to add more by suggesting those were the only three I knew. Those original three were just the ones that are most depressing to me (especially Hunchback of Notre Dam as I've been there, just without the whole hunchback part). But the Little Mermaid example was a bit of cherry picking, yeah, because it is definitely a "what if" one. The rest are just going on what the movies and their endings left us with.
I just felt like your initial response to Jimmy was trolling him a bit, and I'll generally poke back at that. ;-)

If you wanted a good example, you'd have gone to Old Yeller, which was of course a rare movie that's faithful to the book. The Little Mermaid was an atrocious try at your point ... especially since they utterly flipped the ending of the written story, which WAS tragic. Of course, there are many animations which are unquestionably happy endings, and I can't think of a single live action Disney film that wasn't, other than the just mentioned Old Yeller. I'm not kidding when I say there are three or four happy endings for every one you could legitimately make a case for otherwise. And yes, I thought they went WAY against type when they decided to do Hunchback of Notre Dame.

There's another Disney film, which, while it's a satisfying and happy ending, has teared me up at the end for almost 60 years ... Follow Me, Boys.
 
Top