Writing Forums

Writing Forums is a privately-owned, community managed writing environment. We provide an unlimited opportunity for writers and poets of all abilities, to share their work and communicate with other writers and creative artists. We offer an experience that is safe, welcoming and friendly, regardless of your level of participation, knowledge or skill. There are several opportunities for writers to exchange tips, engage in discussions about techniques, and grow in your craft. You can also participate in forum competitions that are exciting and helpful in building your skill level. There's so much more for you to explore!

hELLO: I'M R.K.SINGH, Indian English poet.... (1 Viewer)

rksingh

Senior Member
RAM KRISNA SINGH

Ram Krishna Singh is a university professor whose main fields of interest consist of Indian English writing, especially poetry, and English for Specific Purposes, especially for science and technology. He was born on 31 December 1950 in Varanasi, India. Apart from a BA earned in 1970, he gained his MA in English Literature from Banaras Hindu University in 1972 and Ph D from Kashi Vidyapith, Varanasi, in 1981. He also obtained a Diploma in Russian in 1972. Dr Singh started his career in journalism, as a Compilation Officer in the District Gazetteers Department, Lucknow, 1973, and a Journalist with the Press Trust of India, New Delhi, 1973-74. Changing to teaching he became a Lecturer at the Royal Bhutan Polytechnic, Deothang, Bhutan, 1974-76. Joining the Indian School of Mines in Dhanbad as a Lecturer from 1976-83, he then rose to Assistant Professor in 1983. He has now been Professor of English and Head of the Institute’s Department of Humanities and Social Sciences since 1993.

A reviewer, critic and contemporary poet who writes in Indian English, Dr. Singh is the author of more than 145 research articles and 160 book reviews. He has published 32 books, including : Savitri : A Spiritual Epic (Criticism, 1984); My Silence (poems, 1985); Sound and Silence (edited articles on Krishna Srinivas, 1986); Indian English Writing : 1981-1985 : Experiments with Expression (ed., 1987, rept. 1991); Using English in Science and Technology (textbook, 1988, rev. and rept, 2000); Recent Indian English Poets : Expressions and Beliefs (ed. 1992); Two Poets: R.K. Singh (I DO NOT QUESTION) Ujjal Singh Bahri (THE GRAMMAR OF MY LIFE) (poems, 1994); General English Practice (textbook, 1995); Writing Your Thesis and Research Papers (1996); Anger in Action : Explorations of Anger in Indian Writing in English (ed.,1997); My Silence and Other Selected Poems : 1974-1994 (poems, 1996); Above the Earth’s Green (poems, 1997); Psychic Knot : Search for Tolerance in Indian English Fiction (ed., 1998); New Zealand Literature : Some Recent Trends (ed.,1998); Every Stone Drop Pebble (haiku, 1999); Multiple-Choice General English for UPSC Competitive Exams (textbook, 2001); Cover to Cover (poems, 2002). Pacem in Terris ( haiku, English and Italian, 2003), Communication : Grammar and Composition ( textbook, 2003), Sri Aurobindo’s Savitri : Essays on Love, Life and Death ( Critical articles, 2005), Teaching English for Specific Purposes : An Evolving Experience ( Research articles and review essays, 2005), Voices of the Present: Critical Essays on Some Indian English Poets (2006), and The River Returns (tanka and haiku collection, 2006). His works have been anthologized in about 150 publications, while his editorial activities extend to include guest-editing of Language Forum, 1986, 1995, and Creative Forum, 1991, 1997, 1998, besides being co-editor of the latter publication from 1987-90, General Editor of Creative Forum New Poets Series, and service on the editorial boards of Canopy, Indian Book Chronicle, Indian Journal of Applied Linguistics, Reflections, Titiksha, International Journal of Translation, Poetcrit, and SlugFest. He has also edited the ISM Newsletter for about five years.


His poems have been translated into French, Spanish, Romanian, Chinese, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Japanese, Bulgarian, German, Italian, Portuguese, Greek, Esperanto, Kannada, Tamil, and Bangla. Forty two full-length articles on his poetry have been published from 1988-2005. A book, on his poetry, New Indian English Poetry: An Alternative Voice: R.K.Singh (ed: I.K. Sharma, 2004), is a comprehensive presentation of his creativity since the 1970s. His works have been explored in one M.Phil and five Ph.D. theses of various universities.

In recognition of his achievements Professor Singh has received several awards and honours, among them an Honorary LittD from the World Academy of Arts and Culture, Taiwan, 1984, Fellowship of the International Poets Academy, Madras, 1987, Fellowship of the International Writers and Artists Association, USA, the Michael Madhusudan Award, Calcutta, 1994, Poet of the Year Award, 1995 from the Canadian Alumni of the World University, Ontario, Ritsumeikan University Peace Museum Award, Kyoto, 1999, and Certificate of Honour and Prize in Kumamoto International Kusamamoto Haiku Competition, Japan, 2000. He has also been a Universal Peace Ambassador (appointed by the Universal Peace Embassy, Geneva) from 19 June 2006.

Professor Singh is a member of the following organizations: UNESCO ALSED-LSP Network; All-India PEN; English Language Teachers’ Association of India; World Cultural Council Circle of Friends, International Writers and Artists Association; World Poetry Intercontinental; and Society for International Development. The Honorary Secretary of Dhanbad Development Forum from 1992-2004, he was also its Honorary Treasurer from 1983-92, and Honorary Secretary of ISM Teachers Association, Dhanbad, 1977-79. From April 1990-March 1991 he served as elected Representative of Teachers on the General Council and Executive Board of ISM. Prof Singh’s biography appears in some 35 publications in the UK, USA, India and elsewhere.


R.K.SINGH
 
B

Baron

Welcome to the forum. I hope that you enjoy it.

In the United Kingdom, “practice” is the noun, “practise” the verb; but in the U.S. the spelling “practice” is commonly used for both

Forgive the lack of knowledge of our American friend. Perhaps when they learn to spell grey, colour, through and night, among other words, they'll be in a better position to criticise the correct use of the English language.
 

WordWeaver

Senior Member
Baron said:
Welcome to the forum. I hope that you enjoy it.

In the United Kingdom, “practice” is the noun, “practise” the verb; but in the U.S. the spelling “practice” is commonly used for both

Forgive the lack of knowledge of our American friend. Perhaps when they learn to spell grey, colour, through and night, among other words, they'll be in a better position to criticise the correct use of the English language.

Practise, as in Colour and Gray, are in principal to dialect as opposed to language. When speaking of modern language, Practice stands the correct spelling. When teaching of dialect, sub-dialect and its counter points, as well as word origin, Practise holds true. In the case of usage, it is simply a mistake; not proper.

I forgive your ignorance, as I can clearly tell you are not familiar with the evolution of language.
 
Last edited:
B

Baron

I'm English and its our language and thankfully has not been totally degenerated in its usage over here by American influences. I forgive your ignorance on the subject and continue to value the Oxford dictionary above Websters

Rob
 
B

Baron

WordWeaver said:
Practise, as in Colour and Gray, are in principal to dialect as opposed to language. When speaking of modern language, Practice stands the correct spelling. When teaching of dialect, sub-dialect and its counter points, as well as word origin, Practise holds true. In the case of usage, it is simply a mistake; not proper.

I forgive your ignorance, as I can clearly tell you are not familiar with the evolution of language.


Cambridge University Dictionary
practise (TRAIN) UK, US practice
verb [I or T]
to do or play something regularly or repeatedly in order to become skilled at it:
I'm quite good at tennis but I need to practise my serve.
She practises the violin every day.
[+ ing form of verb] His written French is very good but he needs to practise speaking it.
practice
noun [C or U]
when you do something regularly or repeatedly to improve your skill at doing it:
I need to get some more practice before I take my driving test.
Are you coming to cricket practice this evening?
She's never at home because she spends all her free time at hockey practices.
You'll gradually get better at it - it's just a question of practice.
I'm a bit out of practice (= I haven't had any recent experience) but I'd love to play.
Do you mind if I have a few practice shots before we start the game?
practised UK, US practiced
adjective
1 very good at doing something because you have a lot of experience of doing it:
She is a confident and practised speaker who always impresses her audience.
He is practised in the art of public debate.
We need someone who is practised at negotiating business deals.
2 FORMAL describes a skill that has been obtained from a lot of practice:
She performed the song with practised skill.

practise (WORK) UK, US practice
verb [I or T]
to work in an important skilled job for which a lot of training is necessary:
How long have you been practising as a dentist?
She practised medicine for twenty years before she became a writer.

Princeton University Dictionary
practise
A verb
1 drill, exercise, practice, practise

learn by repetition; "We drilled French verbs every day"; "Pianists practice scales"
Category Tree:
learn; study; read; take
╚drill, exercise, practice, practise
2 rehearse, practise, practice

engage in a rehearsal (of)

As RK is a resident of India, where English English is taught, not US English, his spelling is quite correct. Above I cite one English dictionary and one US dictionary. The only reason that I take issue over this is because of your impolite welcome to a newcomer to the forum.

Rob
 

WordWeaver

Senior Member
Baron said:
Cambridge University Dictionary
practise (TRAIN) UK, US practice
verb [I or T]
to do or play something regularly or repeatedly in order to become skilled at it:
I'm quite good at tennis but I need to practise my serve.
She practises the violin every day.
[+ ing form of verb] His written French is very good but he needs to practise speaking it.
practice
noun [C or U]
when you do something regularly or repeatedly to improve your skill at doing it:
I need to get some more practice before I take my driving test.
Are you coming to cricket practice this evening?
She's never at home because she spends all her free time at hockey practices.
You'll gradually get better at it - it's just a question of practice.
I'm a bit out of practice (= I haven't had any recent experience) but I'd love to play.
Do you mind if I have a few practice shots before we start the game?
practised UK, US practiced
adjective
1 very good at doing something because you have a lot of experience of doing it:
She is a confident and practised speaker who always impresses her audience.
He is practised in the art of public debate.
We need someone who is practised at negotiating business deals.
2 FORMAL describes a skill that has been obtained from a lot of practice:
She performed the song with practised skill.

practise (WORK) UK, US practice
verb [I or T]
to work in an important skilled job for which a lot of training is necessary:
How long have you been practising as a dentist?
She practised medicine for twenty years before she became a writer.

Princeton University Dictionary
practise
A verb
1 drill, exercise, practice, practise

learn by repetition; "We drilled French verbs every day"; "Pianists practice scales"
Category Tree:
learn; study; read; take
╚drill, exercise, practice, practise
2 rehearse, practise, practice

engage in a rehearsal (of)

As RK is a resident of India, where English English is taught, not US English, his spelling is quite correct. Above I cite one English dictionary and one US dictionary. The only reason that I take issue over this is because of your impolite welcome to a newcomer to the forum.

Rob

I know what the dictionary says on both terms, and as I have stated, it is a matter of dialect and evolution. Of the 100 reasons the British are evil, thinking they own full rights to the English language stands at the top of the list. In actuality, the British didn't invent the language, it was brought to them by Germainic settlers and Roman forces from the Anglo-Frisian dialects.

When the Scandinavians conquered England in the 9th century, they brought a German dialect, then when the Normans conqured in the 11th century I believe, they brought with them a French dialect. In truth, traditional English originated from the mixed dialects of German and French. Not to mention the fact English stole words from Latin and Greek.

As in Modern English, printing and the different dialects of government brought wave to the Shakesperian era of the language.

In truth you do not own the English language as you claim to. The day America became independant from British rule is the day when we offically have the right to do whatever the hell we want with our language. You keep to your outdated Oxford dictionary, which as I have stated above, is just a compilation of stolen dialects and roots. I'll stick to the evolved version of Post-Modern English, thank you.
 
Last edited:
B

Baron

The second dictionary quoted above is an American one, unless Princeston has moved. The majority of English speaking countries still use UK English despite the advent of Microsoft. Both this dictionary and Webster's offer the spelling practise as acceptable. So you are arrogant to suggest that the way that you believe that language has "evolved" in the USA should be imposed on others, even though your own dictionaries disagree with you.

The real issue is that I believe your pompous and impolite greeting to RK to be totally unwarranted, your criticism both uneducated and invalid. Perhaps an apology for criticising the fact that he has properly used English as spoken and taught in his own country would not go amiss.

Rob
 
Last edited by a moderator:

WordWeaver

Senior Member
Baron said:
The second dictionary quoted above is an American one, unless Princeston has moved. The majority of English speaking countries still use UK English despite the advent of Microsoft. Both this dictionary and Webster's offer the spelling practise as acceptable. So you are arrogant to suggest that the way that you believe that language has "evolved" in the USA should be imposed on others, even though your own dictionaries disagree with you.

The real issue is that I believe your pompous and impolite greeting to RK to be totally unwarranted, your criticism both uneducated and invalid. Perhaps an apology for criticising the fact that he has properly used English as spoken and taught in his own country would not go amiss.

Rob

No, you're missing the point, I'm simply stating that England did not invent, and therefore holds no sole ownership over the language. As a teacher of English, he should teach English in all its forms, as well as hold biased views to none. All languages evolve, and the sheer recognition of this has nothing to do with arrogance, just the evolution of language. With that being said, it is your arrogant views on the English language that merit my argument. Considering the English language's entire basis is stolen from other languages, you have no right to claim that all other forms of English are incorrect. Learn the history of your own language and then try to talk to me about the "Correct" terminology.

With that being said, it is your uneducated and arrogant view on the "English" English language that blinds your acceptance of evolution. The language was never truly yours to begin with, therefore is is not improper to suggest that Post Modern English should be written and spoken as such. Considering this, it is "Practice," not "Practise." You sir, are nothing more than a pompous blowhard.

Good day.
 
Last edited:
B

Baron

I think that I need to explain this in the simplest terms, blowhard, sorry, WordWeaver; You have given a very rude introduction of yourself to a newcomer who has made no error. The man posted a spelling that is considered correct in his own country into his profile. He was not trying to teach but simply providing information about himself. You have wrongly criticised this and possibly, helped by this discourse, discouraged him from using this forum. Would it really be so much to ask that you admit that you were wrong in doing this and that you offer the man an apology and perhaps offer something that might make him feel welcome.

Rob
 

Mallignamius

Senior Member
Welcome, Ram Krishna Singh. And kudos to you for your accomplishments.

And stinky, old zagnuts for the anyone else caught up in the mess of getting it right in an introduction thread.
 

rksingh

Senior Member
Thanks, Rob, for taking up the cudgels against the impolite and rude assertions of Wordweaver, who is not an ELT expert or practitioner, nor does he understand what it means to teach English as a second language. I do not accept his authority, whatsoever his background, for I know well what I should do as a professor of English (I need no lessons from him about what I should do), with enough academic standing to enter into an argument with the likes of him. Let's ignore him, for he does not know what he is saying.

R K
 
Last edited:
D

Dr. Malone

Hi

Hello Dr.

My father goes to India quite often (outsourcing) and he tells me that the Indian people he works with are among the most intelligent, well educated people he has ever met. From your creditintials, it would seem you fit into that profile fairly well.
He enjoys his trips, except for the lack of good hamburgers and steaks.
 

Futhark

Senior Member
... As a teacher of English, he should teach English in all its forms, as well as hold biased views to none. ... Considering this, it is "Practice," not "Practise."

Sorry, WW, but I'd have to say that these two statements completely contradict one another. You're being pretty biased in your tirade, here.

Also, would you seriously stand up and argue that "color" is superior to "colour," "bus" is superior to "lorry," and "parking lot" is superior to "car park"? These differences are all just branches of the differing evolution of the English language. Hell, there's a whole ocean separating the U.S. from the U.K.; inconsistencies were bound to pop up. Just as the British don't have a monopoly on the language, American usage is not the end-all. (Despite what your nifty little Microsoft spell-checker may say.)

To R.K.: Glad to have you on the Forum. As you can tell, there's never a dull moment around here. Don't let any of this scare you off. We'd all like to see what you have to offer!
 
Top