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Has Anyone Tried Google Docs? (1 Viewer)

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Pallandozi

Senior Member
I use it, and it has been pretty reliable. Though, being paranoid, I do also make regular off-line backups.

The worse drawback for me, so far, has been the limit on the length of document it can convert to PDF format.
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
I use it, and it has been pretty reliable. Though, being paranoid, I do also make regular off-line backups.

The worse drawback for me, so far, has been the limit on the length of document it can convert to PDF format.
I've only just got it. It feels familiar and I like many of the features, including saving older versions automatically.
 

vranger

Staff member
Supervisor
If you're only using Scrivener as a word processor, you're missing the boat. The organizational features are the reason to use Scrivener. I use Google Docs to share collaborative projects, not to work in.
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
If you're only using Scrivener as a word processor, you're missing the boat. The organizational features are the reason to use Scrivener. I use Google Docs to share collaborative projects, not to work in.
I don't use Scriverer. I got it but found it too much. I just want a word processor and that's about it.
 

vranger

Staff member
Supervisor
I don't use Scriverer. I got it but found it too much. I just want a word processor and that's about it.
You may find it more useful when you move up to novels, although I have a Scrivener project that I keep all my WF creative material in. Very handy.
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
You may find it more useful when you move up to novels, although I have a Scrivener project that I keep all my WF creative material in. Very handy.
I know what it is and it's odd. I want to be published and work towards that so if the word processor I'm using looks like something that's published, it has a psychological effect on me. Changing the fonts has a similar effect on me too, depending on what genre I'm writing.
 

LadySilence

Senior Member
I know and use it.
I find it handy when I'm not at the computer, and can't use Scrivener.
And complete (like Word, Open Office, etc) you can use it anywhere.
When I'm not on the PC, I always use it, on the Mobile, on the Tablet.
I highly recommend it.
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
MS Word to write, google docs to share. I probably should move to scrivener at some point.
Do you write the whole manuscript in one on Word or have separate files for each chapter? I've always written them separately but I'm wondering if it's better to keep them all together.
 

Mark Twain't

Staff member
Board Moderator
I know what it is and it's odd. I want to be published and work towards that so if the word processor I'm using looks like something that's published, it has a psychological effect on me. Changing the fonts has a similar effect on me too, depending on what genre I'm writing.
Scrivener can be set up to look like a word processor or a 'published' book. I have mine set up as the latter and I could never go back to Word which, to me, is software produced from the depths of Hades.

I use Google Docs at work for writing user manuals but only because I have to and it just seems to be Word Lite to me so only slightly less annoying.

At the end of the day, we're all different. Some will prefer Word, others will prefer Scrivener or other similar software so try them and decide for yourself as others will always see things differently.
 

bdcharles

Wɾ¡ʇ¡∩9
Staff member
Media Manager
Do you write the whole manuscript in one on Word or have separate files for each chapter? I've always written them separately but I'm wondering if it's better to keep them all together.
I actually have it divided into three, largely so that when I share it to betas it doesn't crash their apps or somehow put them off. But I loaded my one thus-far-complete MS into a single monster of a doc yesterday in readines for KDP. For shorter novels, they are all in one part until that becomes too weighty. One doc per chapter would quickly get very messy for me, as there is lots of NOVELNAME_finalfinal_version21_b_thisisit_v7A.theactual_real_realthing_2-for_bob_the_beta.docx type conventions:)
 

KeganThompson

Senior Member
That's all I use lol. When I was 12-13 I used word but that was before they had an automatic save feature like docs. Let's just say that on more than one occasion some pieces of work went missing. lol
Never used Scrivener...I don't need anything else to overwhelm me with writing. I do that enough on my own lol. Maybe at some point I will get it but for now, I'm keeping it simple
 

vranger

Staff member
Supervisor
LONG ago I used to write a chapter per document. But then I had to concatenate them all to publish, so I went to one doc for a novel. Scrivener gives me both. One document per chapter, but it puts them together on the export when I'm ready to take it to my proofreading app and then publish.
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
LONG ago I used to write a chapter per document. But then I had to concatenate them all to publish, so I went to one doc for a novel. Scrivener gives me both. One document per chapter, but it puts them together on the export when I'm ready to take it to my proofreading app and then publish.
Google Docs allows you to sort by heading, which give you much the same thing.
 

Megan Pearson

Senior Member
Used Google docs for work. Maybe it's just me, but for me, it will always be compartmentalized in the 'necessary productive tool for paycheck' category. So maybe I'm biased.

Love Scrivener. Always amazed when I discover what else it can do. (It's pretty awesome!) Can't say anything bad about it, but I do only use it for my fiction.

All of my serious writing is in Word. Word does not offer the same organizational features Scrivener does, but I have come to really appreciate its sharability and its ability to track changes. (I am not sure if Scrivener has the same features or not, so this might just be a reflection of my own learning curve & not a mark against Scrivener!)

No mention yet of Scrapple? Also put out by Literature & Latte, I use it off-and-on when I want to see a visual outline of what I'm writing. Likewise, even if I'm writing fiction in Scrivener, I find Word is the better tool for me for outlining, which I prefer for its ease of use. I find Scrapple is great for brainstorming.

I think the best tools are those we actively employ without giving them a second thought. Every now and again 'the great debate' comes up for me, as to whether I should invest in some fancy novel writing software or not. Whenever it does, after a flurry of investigative activity & time lost comparing this new thing to that, the winner has always been clear. Sticking with software that I know how to use, that is dynamic yet efficient, and that still offers room for me to comfortably grow into, has kept me with Scrivener for nearly ten years now.

(But then, that evil thought returns & whispers, "what if...?" And it throws me back in a flurry of 'the great debate' again.)
 

Theglasshouse

WF Veterans
I like it because of the free language and grammar correctors. One of these called language tools works almost as good as grammarly and is free. I also use readspeaker there. Google extensions make it a good choice for people who find grammar challenging. I barely use Scrivener because of that and since I am not planning a novel anytime soon.
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
I like it because of the free language and grammar correctors. One of these called language tools works almost as good as grammarly and is free. I also use readspeaker there. Google extensions make it a good choice for people who find grammar challenging. I barely use Scrivener because of that and since I am not planning a novel anytime soon.
What's the best grammar checker add on?
 

Theglasshouse

WF Veterans
I like the one called Language Tools. There is an old.and new version. It checked every page of my 4400 word short story I workshopped here in Google docs. Occasionally it will mention a wrong comma misuse that is different from grammarly but it is worth a try. It checks for more than one language.

Here is the new version. I don't know which I have installed. There is an old version. This won't work for free for e-mails but worked for free for me in Google docs. Checking 4400 words is good for free.

 

indianroads

Staff member
Global Moderator
What software we use and how we organize our work is largely a matter of personal preference. I suggest people try different platforms and see what works for them. I have an aversion to keeping my work somewhere other than my computer and backup drives.

I use MS Excel for early plotting, world building, character profiles (a sheet for each main character, and separate sheets for antagonists and ancillary characters), I also list names of products used and miscellaneous stuff.

I use MS Word for in depth plotting, the draft of the novel (I only do one, with each chapter in a separate document), subsequent editing passes, notes, and a scratch doc I use for stuff I discard but can't stand to delete. Once complete the novel is put into the Word template from Amazon. There's a free Grammarly plug in for Word that does a fair job.
 
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