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Funny overdone logic in writing (1 Viewer)

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Kane Jiang

Senior Member
Sometimes, some people can be overly logically precise when writing.

I came up with these examples for your enjoyment. They are overdone examples of using too much logical precision. I hope you find them funny (imagine a person or animal arguing about it):

"I paid what was the price."
instead of
"I paid the price." (You don't pay the actual literal price. The price doesn't change hands when you pay it.)

"I reported my impression of an accident."
instead of
"I reported an accident." (You can't report an accident if it isn't with you. You can only report what you observed.)

"He told me his concept of what I should do."
instead of
"He told me what to do." (He can't tell you the literal actions or events. He can only tell you his idea or convey symbols of what you should do.)

"I wrote down my concept of what happened."
instead of
"I wrote down what happened." (You can't write literal events of what happened. You can only write down symbols or ideas representing what happened.)

"The concept of kicking a ball off center is a great idea."
instead of
"Kicking a ball off center is a great idea." (Kicking a ball is an action, not a concept.)

When talking about a mortgage of a house, a house mortgage is incorrect terminology. Because the mortgage belongs to the house in the phrase "mortgage of a house," the correct terminology is a house's mortgage.
 

Olly Buckle

Mentor
Patron
It reminds me of the progression;

I love my mum
I love my dad
I love my sister
I love my dog
I love my cat
I love my rabbit
I love my hamster
I love my mouse
I love my butterfly
I love my beetle
I love my ant

At what point does one pass from the acceptable to the ridiculous?
 

seigfried007

Senior Member
It reminds me of the progression;

I love my mum
I love my dad
I love my sister
I love my dog
I love my cat
I love my rabbit
I love my hamster
I love my mouse
I love my butterfly
I love my beetle
I love my ant

At what point does one pass from the acceptable to the ridiculous?

I love my God.
I love my country.
I love my family.
I love my children.
I love my husband.
I love this book.
I love this character.
I love this song.
I love the taste of this beverage.
I love ice cream.
I love my husband's butt.
 

luckyscars

WF Veterans
Sometimes, some people can be overly logically precise when writing.

I came up with these examples for your enjoyment. They are overdone examples of using too much logical precision. I hope you find them funny (imagine a person or animal arguing about it):

"I paid what was the price."
instead of
"I paid the price." (You don't pay the actual literal price. The price doesn't change hands when you pay it.)

"I reported my impression of an accident."
instead of
"I reported an accident." (You can't report an accident if it isn't with you. You can only report what you observed.)

"He told me his concept of what I should do."
instead of
"He told me what to do." (He can't tell you the literal actions or events. He can only tell you his idea or convey symbols of what you should do.)

"I wrote down my concept of what happened."
instead of
"I wrote down what happened." (You can't write literal events of what happened. You can only write down symbols or ideas representing what happened.)

"The concept of kicking a ball off center is a great idea."
instead of
"Kicking a ball off center is a great idea." (Kicking a ball is an action, not a concept.)

When talking about a mortgage of a house, a house mortgage is incorrect terminology. Because the mortgage belongs to the house in the phrase "mortgage of a house," the correct terminology is a house's mortgage.

These aren't really examples of precision, logical or otherwise. For example concept in the contexts of these examples doesn't add precision to the statements in which it appears, it actually does the opposite by muddying.

These are examples of bad writing through overwrite - addition of superfluous words that mean nothing.
 
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