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Frankenstein (1 Viewer)

Girl in Story

Senior Member
Oh, this is almost physically painful. A section just for classics, but there isn't a single topic about Frankstein. That hurts.

I love Frankenstein so much. The story of how it was written is almost as cool as the actual novel, but the book itself is so incredible. It's philisophical, scientific, horrific, romantic, religious, a social commentary, and just plain fun to read.

Anyone else addicted or am I alone here?
 

Girl in Story

Senior Member
I know, that movie is disgusting. The coolest thing about the creature was that he wasn't a monster until people made him that way, but the '31 film made him mute and animalistic, and I bet you that the film version of the monster never read Paradise Lost.
 

Modern Prometheus

Senior Member
There's one thing that always bugged me about the ending of the book. The Wretch vows to travel to the north pole where he will make a funeral pire to burn himself alive... where would he get the fuel?
EDIT: Oh wait, the book was published before anyone reached the pole. That explains it.
 
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Girl in Story

Senior Member
Yeah, that's kind of vague, but you've got to give any author a little room to breathe. Especially since Shelley was like, eighteen.
 

The Hack

Senior Member
Great book. I agree that the story of how Shelley wrote the book is even more interesting than the book itself (especially considering her age).

Modern Prometheus, I had seen your name and couldn't place where I had heard it before. It wasn't until I saw this thread that I read your signature and remembered that it was the subtitle to Frankenstein (which I also find cool, as I love Greek mythology).
 

Girl in Story

Senior Member
Yeah, one thing I thought was kind of cool, was how when Mary and Percy Shelley were hanging out at Lord Byron's Villa Diodati, (I know I'm a nerd) Byron's phsyician wrote The Vampyre, which everyone (including Mary Shelley) thought sucked, but it basically paved the way for novels like Dracula. So in a way, two classic horror stories were made possible that summer.
 

lilacstarflower

Senior Member
I found it pretty dry to start with. The building of 'the wretch' was mostly skipped over and the climaxe of bringing it to life was passive. To me this could have been really great, considering the rest of the book is filled with great prose.
 

Linton Robinson

Senior Member
A classic????? Hmmm

One funny thing I notice. Almost nobody knows the name of the monster. But he had a name. And it WASN'T "Frankenstein"
 

lilacstarflower

Senior Member
Frankenstein was the name of his creator - the narrator of most of the story.

Frankenstein often referred to the monster as 'the wretch' - it's really annoying when people think they know the story
 
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Dawnstorm

Senior Member
The story of how it was written is almost as cool as the actual novel, but the book itself is so incredible.

I wonder whether you know Brian Aldiss' novel Frankenstein Unbound, which is a fun tribute that includes both Mary Shelley & Co and Frankenstein & Co as characters. (There's a film, too, which was surprisingly close to the book.)

Have you seen the Ken Russel film Gothic? I think it's about the night when the novel was conceived, but it's long ago I've seen that one.

***

lin said:
Well, those who DO know the story tend to know that the creation was named "Adam"

Well, I do know the story, but this detail escapes me. Searching the document at Project Gutenberg reveals three mentions of "Adam" always referring to the biblical character in Paradise Lost. Different edition?
 

lilacstarflower

Senior Member
That was something that confused me too - I read the story a year ago and I was sure Frankenstein only called his creation 'the wretch' because he couldn't bring himself to accept it as a human.

I'll need to re-read it
 

Girl in Story

Senior Member
I'm pretty sure the creature was never called Adam. One thing that comment reminded me of though, is that Victor Frankenstein was named such because in Paradise Lost, Milton often referred to God as "the Victor." But the creature never had a name.
 

Linton Robinson

Senior Member
Adam, first of a new race... and who the MONSTER sees himself as being.

Not having a book at hand, I turned to Google, where the "Adam" name has some support, but not really conclusive. (see below)

Most seem to think it was called "the creature", as I recall, not "the wretch"


Whatever you do, don't use "Frankenstein" to refer to the ''monster''. His name is Adam, at least according to readings given by Mary Shelley during her lifetime. In the text of the book itself, though, he is generally referred to as "the creature".
Frankensteins Monster - Television Tropes & Idioms

A popular clip of the Boris Karloff version of Frankenstein shows Frankenstein's monster (named Adam in the book, but nameless in the movie) moaning in fear of fire as he runs from a peasant mob carrying torches. This is the polar opposite of the intelligent, sensitive, and articulate creature in the book necessary for Mary Shelley's theme.
4Literature || Humanity In Frankenstein


According to The People's Almanac, at one point the movie was to have included a line of dialogue giving the Monster the name, Adam. The Almanac indicates that an early print of this film may have indeed been released with just such a scene, but that it was cut when audiences began referring to the Monster by the name Frankenstein.
Frankenstein (1931) - Trivia
 

edropus

Senior Member
I found it pretty dry to start with. The building of 'the wretch' was mostly skipped over and the climaxe of bringing it to life was passive. To me this could have been really great, considering the rest of the book is filled with great prose.

Like (I imagine) a great number of people, I saw the movie and wore the costume long before reading the book. With those expectations, I found the actual method of reanimation refreshing. It's simple, paranoid and relatively realistic.
 

Linton Robinson

Senior Member
There is probably a book, or at least thesis in the way literary heroes (especially from that English era) have taken on different characteristics in films: and are far better known in the film context.

Tarzan
Peter Pan
Robin Hood
Count Dracula

among others
 

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