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Fragment Query (1 Viewer)

TheMightyAz

Mentor
It's another Word problem I keep getting. I don't see any problem. I've got a subject (houses) and a verb (well-maintained). If I remove the dash between 'well' and 'maintained' it removes the fragment flag but then highlights well maintained as incorrect without the dash. Is it perhaps because it's not picking up on the verb 'maintained' properly?

On either side, terraced houses, their meek, well-maintained front gardens, a façade.


I've changed to this and it doesn't flag it. What is causing the problem?

On either side, terraced houses, their well maintained front gardens, a façade.

 

Foxee

Patron
Patron
If this is only a fragment of a sentence it's hard to tell much.

Here's one bit of info that might shed light on why it's marked wrong the first way and not the second that you've posted:
Generally, hyphenate two or more words when they come before a noun they modify and act as a single idea. This is called a compound adjective. When a compound adjective follows a noun, a hyphen is usually not necessary. Example: The apartment is off campus.
Though it looks like "well-maintained front gardens" should be okay so maybe your wealth of commas is a problem in the software sorting things out.
 

bdcharles

Wɾ¡ʇ¡∩9
Staff member
Media Manager
It's another Word problem I keep getting. I don't see any problem. I've got a subject (houses) and a verb (well-maintained). If I remove the dash between 'well' and 'maintained' it removes the fragment flag but then highlights well maintained as incorrect without the dash. Is it perhaps because it's not picking up on the verb 'maintained' properly?



I've changed to this and it doesn't flag it. What is causing the problem?



I’d say the second thinks ‘well’ is the subject, like a wishing well, and it is doing the maintaining...
 

Phil Istine

WF Veterans
I would regard "well-maintained" as an adjective rather than a verb.
The first one looks better to me as a fragment.
It may be that Word doesn't like your first version because it sees no verb in the sentence, and sentences ought to have a verb under the stricter rules of grammar. However, because the second version has the hyphen removed, maybe Word incorrectly sees a verb (maintained), but throws a wobbly because "well maintained" has no hyphen.
Personally, I would go with the first version and give Word the middle finger. Adjectives like that ought to be hyphenated when they precede the noun they describe, though I have seen them omitted sometimes.
Computerised grammar checking is all very well, but sometimes we must use our human intelligence to override the artificial kind.
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
I would regard "well-maintained" as an adjective rather than a verb.
The first one looks better to me as a fragment.
It may be that Word doesn't like your first version because it sees no verb in the sentence, and sentences ought to have a verb under the stricter rules of grammar. However, because the second version has the hyphen removed, maybe Word incorrectly sees a verb (maintained), but throws a wobbly because "well maintained" has no hyphen.
Personally, I would go with the first version and give Word the middle finger. Adjectives like that ought to be hyphenated when they precede the noun they describe, though I have seen them omitted sometimes.
Computerised grammar checking is all very well, but sometimes we must use our human intelligence to override the artificial kind.

Yeah, I never thought of that. So separately it would be picking it up as a verb and an adverb?
 

Matchu

Senior Member
PLEASE talk to your computer. I have the prepared statement:

‘Word, my love, I see your point but on this occasion we’re moving on...together...does that offend? I’m sorry, I’m the chief of the operation, I have an O level, honey.’

[probably caps due to marriage to computer, apols]
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
PLEASE talk to your computer. I have the prepared statement:

‘Word, my love, I see your point but on this occasion we’re moving on...together...does that offend? I’m sorry, I’m the chief of the operation, I have an O level, honey.’

[probably caps due to marriage to computer, apols]

It's annoying. That's why I use this to double check: https://www.reverso.net/spell-checker/english-spelling-grammar/

Word at least has me asking questions I wouldn't ordinarily ask, so I'll give it that.
 
Last edited:

Matchu

Senior Member
Ach, have confidence in yourself. ‘Voice,’ remember. I had a life write in a mag a couple of years back - and my old Dad in the write - salivating over his ‘chip & egg.’ Of course, sub-editors in London ‘corrected’ his dialect. I had a squeak and they put it back...so..so I remain properly incoherent :)
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
Ach, have confidence in yourself. ‘Voice,’ remember. I had a life write in a mag a couple of years back - and my old Dad in the write - salivating over his ‘chip & egg.’ Of course, sub-editors in London ‘corrected’ his dialect. I had a squeak and they put it back...so..so I remain properly incoherent :)

I DO have confidence in myself! :) I just like to find out these little things as I go.
 
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