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Former Adventures in Healthcare (Language Warning) (1 Viewer)

PiP

Staff member
Co-Owner
I have tremendous respect for the nurses and carers like yourself who 'care'., Musical. They work so hard and always go that extra mile to help their patients. You are certainly right when you say ""New nurse. Young and in over her head. She should've asked her Charge Nurse to take a look. It's not a sin to be in over your head, but not knowing it..." It's not just the young nurses. My daughter nearly died of septicemia through neglect and ignorance.

I'm sure Potty would have a few words to say as well. He works in a Care home and has actually written a book (fiction based on fact) and it highlights the plight of some patients. Have you thought about translating your experiences into a book?
 

musichal

WF Veterans
I have tremendous respect for the nurses and carers like yourself who 'care'., Musical. They work so hard and always go that extra mile to help their patients. You are certainly right when you say ""New nurse. Young and in over her head. She should've asked her Charge Nurse to take a look. It's not a sin to be in over your head, but not knowing it..." It's not just the young nurses. My daughter nearly died of septicemia through neglect and ignorance.

I'm sure Potty would have a few words to say as well. He works in a Care home and has actually written a book (fiction based on fact) and it highlights the plight of some patients. Have you thought about translating your experiences into a book?

Thank you. I know too well that it isn't just the young ones. There are some who just don't care, they lack empathy. Thankfully, they aren't all like that; most do care, and are understaffed, overworked and underpaid. Everybody says the same about their jobs, too, I know. Well... that could lead into areas not appropriate here.

No book planned, but if it's okay I'll continue to relate experiences here, for any who may wish to read a nurse-eye view of healthcare.

However, when I started this, I really didn't think about putting up a language warning, and that would likely be advisable... can you ask someone to add that?


I'd read that book cover to cover if it were a foot thick in small print. ;)

Thanks TJ. Look in here now and again and tell me if it gets boring or repetitive. I will not, of course, be revealing names of any facilities, patients or healthcare workers. In fact, I am apt to indicate areas other than the true one. Even though retired, I can't disregard privacy rights, nor would I want to do so.
 

Sonata

Senior Member
Hal - the only experience I have is from a patient's view. Where night nurses refuse to help a severely physically disabled but 100% mentally abled patient to go to the bathroom when they know that patient is too disabled to move without help.

Not only refusing to supply a bedpan but insisting on putting an adult diaper on that patient which they will not change from 10pm until 8am.

And then let that patient lay in a urine and/or faeces sodden diaper and bed while they, the night nurses, sleep in the night nurse room, having disconnected all the call buttons.

This was not like this when I did my medical training.
 

TJ1985

Senior Member
Thanks TJ. Look in here now and again and tell me if it gets boring or repetitive. I will not, of course, be revealing names of any facilities, patients or healthcare workers. In fact, I am apt to indicate areas other than the true one. Even though retired, I can't disregard privacy rights, nor would I want to do so.
I like reading stuff like this. I've only got experience as being the one poked and jabbed at 0500, but it always seemed like the nursing staff was always at a hard run. It's nice to know why.
 

Anari

Senior Member
You have a great thread going here, Hal. Your writings of some of the horrors of healthcare are as good as some of mine. I am enjoying it.
 

midnightpoet

WF Veterans
My only hospital experience was after my prostate surgery, and it wasn't good. One little nurse (5-5 and 100 pounds dripping wet) tried to arrange me (about 200 pounds at the time) better in bed, and if it weren't for my wife helping, I would have ended up on the floor. My blood pressure had bottomed out and I was pretty much helpless at the time. Then she griped at my wife for helping. Another one woke me up in the middle of the night to give me pain medicine I didn't need. None of it sounds as bad as what you are describing, but I wanted the bleep out of there. My wife took a hell of a lot better care of me at home.

I'm glad that there are people like you who do care, but I don't have an overall good view of the medical profession in general.
 

musichal

WF Veterans
I owe it to the millions of hard-working nurses to point out that what I'm writing here are some of the worst experiences in my career. A lot of very competent, hard-working nurses go above and beyond, putting their patient's needs ahead of their own, but it is not a thankless job. Patients usually know when they have that type of nurse. I could just as well fill up pages with people who've approached me in WalMarts, grocery stores, drug stores, package liquor stores, and the thanks always begin with "I know you don't remember me..." and they're right, I don't... most nurses experience this fairly often. My wife and I both have, and many other nurses I've known.

Quite often we bring comfort to those in pain or dying. Sometimes we save lives because we spot some complication; even resuscitate some people. We are the eyes, ears, nose, and hands for the doctors. A good crew works like clockwork, and when that happens we are a very effective team of multiple disciplines; when a nurse finds himself in such a place, then the work becomes a little easier. I've had the pleasure of being part of such a team several times, going home feeling tired but also... rejuvenated, proud, useful, and yes, happy.
 

TJ1985

Senior Member
Excellent stuff Hal. I'm enjoying reading this stuff. I'd consider that book idea, because as someone with a lot of surgeries behind him, and oodles of nights spent in a hospital, this is the stuff I always wondered about. Hectic as all hell, but I'd say 99% of them were flawless. The thing is, I sadly cannot recall the name of the best nurses I've dealt with. I know their faces, but names are not there for me. Meanwhile, I just about know the license number of every lousy nurse I ever saw. It's a short list of lousies, but they give the whole industry a bad name.

Thanks for posting, I like reading it. :)
 

musichal

WF Veterans
My only hospital experience was after my prostate surgery, and it wasn't good. One little nurse (5-5 and 100 pounds dripping wet) tried to arrange me (about 200 pounds at the time) better in bed, and if it weren't for my wife helping, I would have ended up on the floor. My blood pressure had bottomed out and I was pretty much helpless at the time. Then she griped at my wife for helping. Another one woke me up in the middle of the night to give me pain medicine I didn't need. None of it sounds as bad as what you are describing, but I wanted the bleep out of there. My wife took a hell of a lot better care of me at home.

I'm glad that there are people like you who do care, but I don't have an overall good view of the medical profession in general.

I have a nightmare of a prostate post-surgical experience which you will be glad not to have read prior to your surgery. I'll get to it sooner or later.
 
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