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Fantasy Novels to Share a World Rather Than to Tell a Story (1 Viewer)

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Gamer_2k4

WF Veterans
What are your thoughts on this? I'm baffled by reviews that praise a fantasy novel's world and lore as though that was the point of writing. There's a book I picked up on a friend's recommendation, Gardens of the Moon, which so far has just appeared to be the author's efforts to show just how thorough his notetaking and worldbuilding was, and apparently plenty of reviewers think that approach is some shining model all aspiring fantasy writers should emulate. Is that the common point of view these days? Or is there still some appreciation for authors who can tell a good story, rather than who can just design a vivid setting?
 

Theglasshouse

WF Veterans
I try to focus on telling a story I would like to think. I don't put an emphasis on prose. Instead I try to create some tension with the characters. I agree world building isn't important nearly as much as character building or tension. Maybe the readers thought it was a unique idea at the time concerning gardens of the moon. I mean that sounds unique to me.
 
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Turnbull

Senior Member
I LOVE worldbuilding. Yes, a story can be too taken up by it, but honestly I crave me a world full of nooks, crannies, and concepts. Absolutely delicious.

But yeah, on an objective basis, characters are more important.
 

TheMightyAz

Mentor
Selling a novel on world building alone would be like selling a movie on special effects alone. Without story and character, it's worthless. If that's the way the media are going to start promoting fantasy/sci-fy, then consider writing some other genre because the market will be dead in ten years.
 

-xXx-

Financial Supporter
What are your thoughts on this? I'm baffled by reviews that praise a fantasy novel's world and lore as though that was the point of writing. There's a book I picked up on a friend's recommendation, Gardens of the Moon, which so far has just appeared to be the author's efforts to show just how thorough his notetaking and worldbuilding was, and apparently plenty of reviewers think that approach is some shining model all aspiring fantasy writers should emulate. Is that the common point of view these days? Or is there still some appreciation for authors who can tell a good story, rather than who can just design a vivid setting?

so.
resources and references.
i will consider this for review,
not "as a reader",
but as a creative.

sometimes
clarifying yes (works)
is
eliminating
no (not so much).

within frameworks.....
;)
 
Story is made up of plot, characters, setting, etc. Many stories prioritize characters but that doesn't mean it's the only way to do it. Characters are not necessarily more important than setting; that depends on the story. Some fantasy and sf prioritizes setting; I personally like that kind of story very much. It works well structured around an exploration or a visitor to the new world, so the reader can experience it as the character does.
 

Tettsuo

WF Veterans
I couldn't do that if I wanted to. My worldbuilding is solely for the purpose of telling a story. Without the story, the world wouldn't be worth a damn to me.
 
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