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Fantasy and Sci-Fi authors (1 Viewer)

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Death_and_her_Cat

I wrote all this for a time capsule thing for school, I want to see who agrees and what your own viwes are so here we go . . .

My favourite authors are Brian Jacques, Robin Jarvis, Terry Pratchett, Anne McCaffrey and J.R.R.Tolkien. I also like J.K.Rowling and many others besides but then I would have too many favourites. All of these authors are my role models and I dare say Idols for my own novel that I am writing which by the time this in unearthed may even be published along with many of my current 55 poems.

Brian Jacques wrote the Redwall series of books set in a world were mice and moles can act like everyday people and based around Redwall abbey and the mighty warrior Martin. I saw him on TV once on Blue Peter sometime earlier this year and his advice to future authors was to “paint a picture with words” He can certainly do that with his remarkable books which I recommend to everyone. You have the villains and the good guys not to mention exciting adventures and puzzles left in the wake of others. An excellent series and a remarkable author.

Robin Jarvis wrote many a trilogy and along with all but one author on my list is still writing books today and adding to his series. I eagerly await his sequel to his latest two trilogies “Deathscent” and “The Thorn Ogres Of Hagwood” which he has only one book of each. He uses both human and animal characters in his various novels delving into fantasy and the paranormal. You need a steady mind to read these books for they will blow your mind. Ancient enemies and mouse colonies. Certainly an author not to be underestimated in his seemingly limitless imagination that also incorporates a little history into most of his books.

Terry Pratchett most famous for his limitless Discworld Series he also has other books besides and books teamed with other authors. The Discworld is a flat world on the back of four elephants which stand on the back of a giant turtles called The Great A’tuin. It is a world so complex and vivid that only one as great as Pratchett could ever fully understand. Normal rules don’t apply and the characters are comic and yet some of the comments are quite logical however comic they may seem. Rincewind the haphazard “wizard” who is a coward and not ashamed of it and the infamous Death make the story come alive with their comic exchanges along with many other hilarious and entertaining characters in the total of 27 Discworld Books. I think out of all the authors I have read it is Pratchett that holds my heart dearest and most true. He is a man after my own heart in his own crazy world. I recommend that these books are read by everyone for they are truly an enlightening experience to anyone.

Anne McCaffrey I have only read two of her Pern books but I am a firm fan. Another excellent author with her own worlds and complicated pasts. As well as her Pern books she has numerous science fiction books that I have not yet had the chance to read but I will someday. She mixes our world with a world in many ways less advanced having to battle “thread” a constant threat from the skies using biologically made dragons made by their ancestors and long since forgotten pasts though in the midst of this fantasy comes deep roots of science fiction when they discover spacw ships. A most intriguing and excellent story and a most excellent author.

J.R.R.Tolkien, need I say more. His famous trilogy immortalized in cinema was first discovered by me in his books as well as the prequel “The Hobbit”. Although for me reading them at the age of 10 it was a little hard going they are excellent books for all ages. I could only ever hope to create anything like any of these authors but hope and try I will.
 

Dragonscales

Senior Member
Try to find the Magician series by Raymond E. Fiest if you like Fantasy. You may have another name to add to that list then :)
 

rydenthorne

Senior Member
If you like Tolkein, I bet you'd enjoy Robert Jordan. He weaves such a complicated and compelling plot that you almost get lost in his world of intricacy.
 

Vee

Senior Member
I cant stand people that like Pratchett or think Pratchett is any good.

The whosamit caboodled the whatchamit and the hizzlefizzle. That is an example of Pratchett.

I'm not familiar with Brian Jacques, Robin Jarvis
 

AdrienneW

Senior Member
Vee said:
I cant stand people that like Pratchett or think Pratchett is any good.

The whosamit caboodled the whatchamit and the hizzlefizzle. That is an example of Pratchett.

I'm not familiar with Brian Jacques, Robin Jarvis



I've tried to read the redwall books a couple of times but loose interest really quick. I think it't because almost all the character speak in accents and he writes out their dialog phonetically, which is ok in small doses, but when you have pages and pages of it because just about every character in a scene talks like that, it really bothers me.

 

Shade

Senior Member
The original Redwall books were good, BJ writes crap now. He uses to have great stories and endings and then he just had these typical endings and was afraid to have actually fighting because he wanted to be more kid-friendly. Tolkien is amazing and I respect Rowling as a writer.
 

Vee

Senior Member
Fair enough Safari - I like it because of the philosophical undertones not the sword and sorcery. I don't find any other genre has that ability. Science-fiction perhaps but I've never read much sci-fi.

On Robert Jordan, the wheel of time series - I found the first 11 chapters of book one difficult to read and after that it was smooth sailing. Unfortunately I read all his books in that series in a matter of weeks and he was only up to Book 8 then. I know he is finally working on Book 12, the last book of the series whilst combatting illness.

I would have to start the series again, however, to stay in touch with the story. I could not just pick up the next book.
 

Emerson Darkness

Senior Member
rydenthorne said:
Give Robert Jordan a try if you enjoy the complicated plots of Tolkein.
I actually think the prologue and the first 15 or so chapters of "the Eye of the World" was Jordan's best stuff. Everything after that is about ten thousand pages of brickabrack.

His world is tremendously descriptive, but his characters couldn't wrestle themselves out of a paper bag. They are all light weight because he has too many of them standing around tapping the little footsies.

BEWARE the plot stall tactic.

If you've read up to book five, skim through the rest because at least fifty new characters come out of nowhere. Their names are almost impossible to pronounce and some of them are just too similar.

Add that to that the fact that you have to wait a considerable amount of time to pick up the next books (Book 12 threatens between 1500 - 2000 pages. RJ's books usually run between 350 - 400 words a page) and it is nearly impossible to keep track of some of those characters.

What's worse is that after eleven books only one important character (as far as heros go) has died. That was in book five, then you learn somewhere in book eleven that she is actually still alive!
Jordan really knows how to play the public for fools. I was one of them, sorry to say...

The most ambitious fantasy writer of our time he may be, but it proved a big waste of time after book three.
 
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Mike C

WF Veterans
Vee said:
I cant stand people that like Pratchett or think Pratchett is any good.

Vee, I'm stunned at your ignorance. I'm not a major fan of his either, but outright condemnation is pretty dumb.
 

Swift84

Senior Member
I guess I'm old-fashioned. My favorite sci-fi writers are H.G. Wells, Arthur C. Clarke, and Isaac Asimov.

Make sure to read these books at some point in your life:

The Invisible Man, by H.G. Wells (the most underrated sci-fi story by the prolific writer)

Childhood's End, by Arthur C. Clarke

End of Eternity, by Isaac Asimov
 

mindaugas

Member
Childhood's End, by Arthur C. Clarke
End of Eternity, by Isaac Asimov

both awesome stories

I've grown to love the Honor Harrington series by David Weber, but I'm a space opera nut. I haven't read a fantasy book yet
 

Scarecrow

Senior Member
I used to read Brian Jacques as a kid, before his books became broken records which are 90% about food. This article summed up his writing style pretty well:

http://www.somethingawful.com/index.php?a=4270

Robert Jordan is also a fantasy author who has fallen from grace. After book 4, the Wheel of Time is all downhill. I'm only reading the series out of obligation now. There's far too many trivial details in his prose (smoothing of skirts, folding of arms etc).
 

wmd

Senior Member
Emerson Darkness said:
....The most ambitious fantasy writer of our time he may be, but it proved a big waste of time after book three.

That is good to know because I have only read the first three books. I still want to finish the series, but if I do I am afraid that I will have to start all over because it has been so long since I finished the third book.

I will probably get the audio books for this series though.
 

Kane

Senior Member
Neil Gaiman is a great author of non-traditional fantasy. I've read three of his novels and a collection of his short stories, and picked up a 4th novel of his tonight. The novels I've read so far are all based in the modern world, but intelligently weave in history, myth, and fantasy. I love his writing style.

Jacqueline Carey is an author with whom I've just been introduced. I recently finished a book called Kushiel's Dart. I enjoyed it, but it's part of a series of at least 5 books, and Kushiel's Dart was over 900 pages, and is surely not the largest of them. I'm a bit wary of treading into long series these days, as I have been disappointed by many I've read. I did just pick up two more of her books tonight, though they are not of the same series. They received high praise from George R. R. Martin, so I am looking forward to starting them.

George R. R. Martin is a favorite of mine. His series, A song of Ice and Fire, is probably one of the best things I have ever read. None of his characters are safe. Your favorites will probably die at some point. His story follows a period of time in his wonderfully crafted world, though his characters are all very real. You will at times hate the "good" guys, and love the "bad" guys, and other times you will wonder which is which. Awesome writer; awesome story.
 

imrhati

Senior Member
I read Asimov's Foundation novel and wished he was still alive so i could kill him for having my best idea before me. Now i refuse to read the rest of the series becuase the summary of one of the sequels sounded oddly like my book Fragments! If I can't read it I can't copy it right? He is still one of my favourites though.

Robert Jordan is neutral on my list. He defonetly has trouble keeping the plot moving aswell as keeping track of his characters.
 

wmd

Senior Member
Kane said:
Neil Gaiman is a great author of non-traditional fantasy. I've read three of his novels and a collection of his short stories, and picked up a 4th novel of his tonight. The novels I've read so far are all based in the modern world, but intelligently weave in history, myth, and fantasy. I love his writing style.


I second that motion. I love Neil Gaimans writing. I have only read Good Omens and American Gods, but both were fantastic. I have been trying to get a copy of Anansi Boys but havent got around to it.
 
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LonSharkin51

I agree with Emerson about Robert Jordan. I enjoyed his first seven books, but when it became obvious he had no intention of ever finishing the story, I gave up. I think he's been playing us all for a bunch of suckers for years.

Having read Tolkien, Jordan, C.S. Lewis, Lloyd Alexander and a few others, I would have to say that the best fantasy series, hands down, is the original Shannara trilogy by Terry Brooks: The Sword of Shannara, The Elfstones of Shannara, and The Wishsong of Shannara.

The Sword of Shannara is one of the most entertaining books I've ever read, regardless of genre, and The Elfstones is nearly as good. All three are fast-paced and peopled with awesome characters. Trust me on this. If you like fantasy, go get the Sword of Shannara today. I guarantee you'll love it.
 
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Tantz Aerine

I believe fantasy is a great medium to create allegories and demonstrate things that hold true for real life. After all, 'magic' is a term originally used to denote anything that technology/science could not explain. If done right (i.e. not resort to magic as a free-for-all deus ex machina) and most of all consistently (to a ruthless level for the characters), I think fantasy can really make people think on philosophical issues as well as sociological and psychological aspects of everyday life. I could argue about this with what I've done with my own fantasy books (as I am a fantasy author) but I wouldn't want it to sound like just an excuse to advertise myself.

As for other authors (who have not yet been mentioned from what I've noticed):

David Levy with The Gods of Foxcroft is a must-read, as it is, in my opinion an excellent merge of science fiction and fantasy-style world building.
 
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