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Elated or delighted (1 Viewer)

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luckyscars

WF Veterans
'Elated' is a word absolutely no normal human being on Planet Earth uses other than a minor coalition consisting of extremely upper-class British women, reformed junkies, Christian rock lyricists and sarcastic American tweens.

Delighted isn't much better. That one has a slightly broader coalition, chiefly consisting of octogenarian theater critics, jewelry salesmen, and the citizens of letters to the Sunday Times mailed in by the beaming uncles of Tunbridge Wells.

Basically, these aren't words normal people use. Why not stick with boring words like 'happy'? Don't reach for the thesaurus.
 

bdcharles

Wɾ¡ʇ¡∩9
Staff member
Media Manager
I would probably steer clear of either, as they seem to result in more tell-heavy text than I'd like. But if I did use them, delighted to me seems to have a more down-to-earth, people-oriented context ("she was delighted with the cake I made her") whereas elation seems to be more of a lofty, solitary, inward feeling ("Reaching the summit left me feeling elated"). Swap the two in these sentences and see how they look, to give an idea of their subtle differences.
 

Phil Istine

WF Veterans
I might use the words when writing in the perspective of particular types of people, but otherwise I would probably use different words.
 

Pulse

Staff member
Senior Mentor
When my canary is a proud father, his chest swells up, he sings and is elated. Consider also exhilarated. Delighted can be a blessing from outside to suprise you and twinkle your eyes.
 

Tettsuo

WF Veterans
Elated and delighted are synonyms. Neither is stronger than the other IMO.

Try reading the sentence you're considering putting them in out loud. If it sounds appropriate, go for it!
 

Taylor

Staff member
Global Moderator
'Elated' is a word absolutely no normal human being on Planet Earth uses other than a minor coalition consisting of extremely upper-class British women, reformed junkies, Christian rock lyricists and sarcastic American tweens.

Delighted isn't much better. That one has a slightly broader coalition, chiefly consisting of octogenarian theater critics, jewelry salesmen, and the citizens of letters to the Sunday Times mailed in by the beaming uncles of Tunbridge Wells.

Basically, these aren't words normal people use. Why not stick with boring words like 'happy'? Don't reach for the thesaurus.

I use these two words all the time. Wonder which category I fit into...lol! I would use them in a sentence something like this:

They just sold their house for over asking. The realtor was delighted and the home owners were elated.

 

BrandonTheWriter

Senior Member
I would use elated, probably. It would depend on the character I think. Some characters would suit delighted more, especially if from a first person POV.
 

Kehlida

Senior Member
I would not consider them stronger than one another per say, but it depends on the context and character's voice. Personally, I think of "elated" as an independent feeling of happiness. I think of "delighted" as a feeling you get from an event or someone doing/saying something.
 

Bloggsworth

WF Veterans
'Elated' is a word absolutely no normal human being on Planet Earth uses other than a minor coalition consisting of extremely upper-class British women, reformed junkies, Christian rock lyricists and sarcastic American tweens.

Delighted isn't much better. That one has a slightly broader coalition, chiefly consisting of octogenarian theater critics, jewelry salesmen, and the citizens of letters to the Sunday Times mailed in by the beaming uncles of Tunbridge Well

Basically, these aren't words normal people use. Why not stick with boring words like 'happy'? Don't reach for the thesaurus.


Oh dear...
 

EternalGreen

Senior Member
Never in my life did I expect someone to claim that any variation of the word “delight” is pretentious or uncommon.

Everyone knows what “elation” means. “Elated” is slightly less common but still clearly understandable by the average person.
 

estranguerro

Senior Member
Never use these two words much, but "elated" sounds like someone having spirits so high they've turned into a sun ray, while "delighted" makes someone sound pleased.

"Delighted" also sounds very posh for me, tea and monocle included.
 

BrandonTheWriter

Senior Member
Never use these two words much, but "elated" sounds like someone having spirits so high they've turned into a sun ray, while "delighted" makes someone sound pleased.

"Delighted" also sounds very posh for me, tea and monocle included.

I'm from the UK and definitely have heard delighted used before, but not very often. I think I have probably heard 'chuffed' or 'pleased' more. I mean 'happy' is the obvious word, but I'd probably find that boring to use in a story and would want to find an alternative.
 

Matchu

Senior Member
I’m disturbed by comments disparaging everyday usage of elation, elated, delight, delightful. I’d use three of the four, at least, in a quasi-medical sense, describing simple behaviours of service users. I believe critics of this language have spent many hours watching many Star Wars films and deserve sympathy.
 
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