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Drawing Attempts ala Reichel (1 Viewer)

sigmadog

Staff member
Media Manager
I improved by taking time and looking at hands. Try googling images of hands and using those images as a model on which to base a drawing.

You can also look at the underlying anatomy to understand how the bones, muscles and tendons work together. Understanding anatomy vastly improves your ability to translate the figure to paper.

Finally, and this is a general tip for drawing anything: Don't draw objects: Draw light. Concern yourself with the shadows; get the shadows right and the object will magically appear. As a test, shine a bright light on an object from the side and, without outlining, capture the shadows; you'll see how shadows define an object's volume better than outlines do. Focusing on the shadow areas will elevate your drawing from the flat two-dimensional paper, giving it volume and making it more lifelike. Of course, some lines are necessary to help you find your way around the subject, but keep them loose and light because in the end it's the shadows that define the object.
 

ShadowEyes

WF Veterans
That is a very detailed answer!
Thank you!

When I was a kid, I would draw rooms and houses, pretty much like an interior designer kind of thing.

Also, I'm a copycat when it comes to faces and people. Everything I draw has to have some "model". I would copy the illustrations on mangas and comics. For the real people, I ask for pictures.

I would love to learn to draw waterfalls and mountains.
You're sitting there, staring at that wonderful creation and trying to recreate it on paper. Ehhhh.

I'd like to see some of your building illustrations someday! :)

Hey, you're welcome.

I remember wanting to draw when I was around 10 or 11. Of course, I wanted to draw anime things because I watched cartoons after school. So it's nice to realize that it's one of my earliest ambitions.

Oh man, I would kill for a real life model. ... But not really kill. The model, I mean. Hehe.

Maybe you will, maybe you will!
 

Reichelina

Senior Member
I hope sigmadog can provide more information and inspiration because I used all of my five-cent words in this post!

Finally, and this is a general tip for drawing anything: Don't draw objects: Draw light. Concern yourself with the shadows; get the shadows right and the object will magically appear. As a test, shine a bright light on an object from the side and, without outlining, capture the shadows; you'll see how shadows define an object's volume better than outlines do. Focusing on the shadow areas will elevate your drawing from the flat two-dimensional paper, giving it volume and making it more lifelike. Of course, some lines are necessary to help you find your way around the subject, but keep them loose and light because in the end it's the shadows that define the object.

Wow!
That is interesting!

I would love to see some of your artworks!
 

sigmadog

Staff member
Media Manager
Ask and ye shall receive.

This is a graphite drawing I did of myself back in 1989. It was just a self portrait without a title until I dug it up a couple years ago and titled it "When I Had Hair But Only One Shoe."

If you look closely you will find very little in the way of line work. The whole subject matter is defined by the shadows, which gives it volume and mass. This is what I mean when I say "drawing is about light."

This is not to say that line drawing has no place or is not real drawing. Not at all. But if someone wants to learn what drawing is all about, they need to start with volume, shadow, light and mass. Once that is understood, they can freely and easily transition to less representational forms. This is my view on learning to draw (though I'm a bit of a traditionalist).

WIHHBOOS.jpg
 

Reichelina

Senior Member
Ask and ye shall receive.

This is a graphite drawing I did of myself back in 1989. It was just a self portrait without a title until I dug it up a couple years ago and titled it "When I Had Hair But Only One Shoe."

If you look closely you will find very little in the way of line work. The whole subject matter is defined by the shadows, which gives it volume and mass. This is what I mean when I say "drawing is about light."

This is not to say that line drawing has no place or is not real drawing. Not at all. But if someone wants to learn what drawing is all about, they need to start with volume, shadow, light and mass. Once that is understood, they can freely and easily transition to less representational forms. This is my view on learning to draw (though I'm a bit of a traditionalist).

View attachment 13171

This made me want to cry.
In fact, I think I will. ---> cries in the corner.

Why are you so talented. Oh dear.
--jealous--
 

sigmadog

Staff member
Media Manager
I'm 54 years old. I've been drawing / painting / designing for about 50 of those years. Trust me, it's not talent, it's mileage. I've always had the desire and I followed through obsessively for most of my life.

You get better at everything by doing it. Often. That's a fact. The only reason my art is at this level is because I've been doing it a long long time.

I think your drawing efforts show promise because you put them out there, and you're trying. That's how you get better. I'm not posting here to make you feel bad; I'm doing so in an effort to help you improve, so please take my examples and suggestions in that light, and don't over criticize your efforts by playing the comparison game. We all work at our own level and that's nothing to be ashamed of.

So, work on the shadows, Reichelina. See what that does for your drawings.

- Steve
 

Reichelina

Senior Member
I'm 54 years old. I've been drawing / painting / designing for about 50 of those years. Trust me, it's not talent, it's mileage. I've always had the desire and I followed through obsessively for most of my life.

You get better at everything by doing it. Often. That's a fact. The only reason my art is at this level is because I've been doing it a long long time.

I think your drawing efforts show promise because you put them out there, and you're trying. That's how you get better. I'm not posting here to make you feel bad; I'm doing so in an effort to help you improve, so please take my examples and suggestions in that light, and don't over criticize your efforts by playing the comparison game. We all work at our own level and that's nothing to be ashamed of.

So, work on the shadows, Reichelina. See what that does for your drawings.

- Steve

This is very much appreciated, Steve.
You have encouraged me to practice more.
Thank you so much!!!!
 

Reichelina

Senior Member
2007.
So I was 16 at that time.
Poor guy has uneven bum.


f7f826c6a0cada621f31e51ec741e0ce.jpg
 

Firemajic

Poetry Mentor
Staff member
Senior Mentor
Love your drawings! I am a fan of simple, uncluttered art work... nice work! Keep that pencil sharp and keep posting...
 

Firemajic

Poetry Mentor
Staff member
Senior Mentor
Ask and ye shall receive.

This is a graphite drawing I did of myself back in 1989. It was just a self portrait without a title until I dug it up a couple years ago and titled it "When I Had Hair But Only One Shoe."

If you look closely you will find very little in the way of line work. The whole subject matter is defined by the shadows, which gives it volume and mass. This is what I mean when I say "drawing is about light."

This is not to say that line drawing has no place or is not real drawing. Not at all. But if someone wants to learn what drawing is all about, they need to start with volume, shadow, light and mass. Once that is understood, they can freely and easily transition to less representational forms. This is my view on learning to draw (though I'm a bit of a traditionalist).

View attachment 13171




This is completely fabulous! DAMN!!! I mean, WOW!!! Sublime composition, delicate use of shading and shadows.. Your skill is awesome.. inspiring.. Thank you for sharing... daaaaamn!!!
 

Firemajic

Poetry Mentor
Staff member
Senior Mentor
Infants are hard to draw, for me.. their heads are bigger, there is little bone structure to be seen, and their facial features are positioned differently than an adult..... but this is cute!
 

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