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Differentiating Character Voices (1 Viewer)

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TheMightyAz

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I thought I'd share this tip with people and hopefully inspire other people to contribute with tips of their own.

People have different characteristics that can be broken down into four main categories: Aural (of the ear), Digital (logical), Kinesthetic (tactile) and Visual (sight). It's just a way of seeing your characters and immediately finding words they'd use to differentiate each of them.

But how can that help to differentiate between the 'voices' of a character?

Joan (Aural): "I hear what you're saying but it doesn't sound right to me."
Jack (Digital) "Look, 'a', I don't care and 'b', if you don't believe me, that's totally fine."
Lora (Kinesthetic) "I can feel you both but still think you're both out of touch."
Greg (Visual) "I can see where you're all coming from."

Thanks to Phil Istine for reminding me of the fourth.
 
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bazz cargo

Retired Supervisor
What kind of attitude to life does your character start off with, and will it be moving on?
I thought I'd share this tip with people and hopefully inspire other people to contribute with tips of their own.

People have different characteristics that can be broken down into three main categories: Aural (of the ear), Digital (logical), Kinesthetic (tactile). I think there was one other but it's been over 40 years since I learned this and I've forgotten. It's not a strict rule. It's just a way of seeing your characters and immediately finding words they'd use to differentiate each of them.

But how can that help to differentiate between the 'voices' of a character?

Joan (Aural): "I hear what you're saying but it doesn't sound right to me."
Jack (Digital) "Look, 'a', I don't care and 'b', if you don't believe me, that's totally fine."
Lora (Kinesthetic) "I can feel you both but still think you're both out of touch."
 

Phil Istine

WF Veterans
I thought I'd share this tip with people and hopefully inspire other people to contribute with tips of their own.

People have different characteristics that can be broken down into three main categories: Aural (of the ear), Digital (logical), Kinesthetic (tactile). I think there was one other but it's been over 40 years since I learned this and I've forgotten. It's not a strict rule. It's just a way of seeing your characters and immediately finding words they'd use to differentiate each of them.

But how can that help to differentiate between the 'voices' of a character?

Joan (Aural): "I hear what you're saying but it doesn't sound right to me."
Jack (Digital) "Look, 'a', I don't care and 'b', if you don't believe me, that's totally fine."
Lora (Kinesthetic) "I can feel you both but still think you're both out of touch."

Using matching types is a good way to attain rapport. Visual is another good one: "I see what you mean..." Type matching (my wording) is a trick commonly used by salespeople, psychotherapists, and others who need to project an air of cooperation. Having characters who each use a different way sounds a reasonable way of helping to differentiate, though it's probably better not to overdo it in case it feels forced.
 

TheMightyAz

Staff member
Mentor
Using matching types is a good way to attain rapport. Visual is another good one: "I see what you mean..." Type matching (my wording) is a trick commonly used by salespeople, psychotherapists, and others who need to project an air of cooperation. Having characters who each use a different way sounds a reasonable way of helping to differentiate, though it's probably better not to overdo it in case it feels forced.

Ah! That's the one I forgot: 'sight'. Yeah, it isn't something you'd want to overdo. It gives you a simple pointer though.
 
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