Writing Forums

Writing Forums is a privately-owned, community managed writing environment. We provide an unlimited opportunity for writers and poets of all abilities, to share their work and communicate with other writers and creative artists. We offer an experience that is safe, welcoming and friendly, regardless of your level of participation, knowledge or skill. There are several opportunities for writers to exchange tips, engage in discussions about techniques, and grow in your craft. You can also participate in forum competitions that are exciting and helpful in building your skill level. There's so much more for you to explore!

Das Korbachetspiel (1 Viewer)

jimmycracker

Senior Member
INT. PALACE - SMALL BEDROOM - DAY

INSERT: A painting of Johann Sebastian Bach, Antonio Vivaldi, George Friderick Handel and Arcangelo Corelli sitting together on a couch with lustrous-gold cushions. All four wear gleaming smiles. The framed painting lies on a wooden table.

Bach’s violin concerto II (2nd movement) plays.

NARRATOR
(reading the newly formed words on screen, music becomes quiet)
April 13th, 1708. King Frederick I of Prussia sat upon his golden throne in his royal palace in the middle of Berlin, not glum by any means, but far from comfortable. He was slightly disinterested, and a bit sterile. So, In a move unbeknownst to scholars, King Frederick I sent for four highly regarded composers by the name of Johann Sebastian Bach, Antonio Vivaldi, George Friderick Handel and Arcangelo Corelli. They were to work together to create an elaborate composition with a “pleasant sound” and a “fervent spirit”. The four composers located throughout Europe hesitantly agreed - as they had no choice - and were allowed stay in King Frederick I’s royal palace.

A violin bow (acting as a cue stick) strikes the painting and sends it flying off the table. VIVALDI, it appears, is the perpetrator. BACH sits on a couch, and upon hearing the noise, glances up from his sheet music.

BACH
(raises eyebrows, smiles)
You’re a quick one with that bow, I must say.

VIVALDI
(seemingly distracted in his tone)
Oh, you know me, Johann. A bit quick on my toes, always moving around, thinking, writing, always in a hurry. Whereas most men stop to lace their boots I simply continue in my path and truss the lace with the other foot. I prance about with the spirit of a hare, the agility of a dancing leaf!

BACH
Perhaps your asthma is merely a signal that you’re out of breath?

VIVALDI
(shakes head, amused)
I see you’re quick with a wit, Johann. But tell me (turns to Bach)... can you compose and write a full concerto in all its parts faster than a copyist can copy it down? Yes, yes, tell me I brag incessantly, declare it as something perpetual, never ceasing... but... let us be fair for a moment, shall we? Someone of my greatness - do they not deserve the privilege of boasting about, sharing their innumerable accomplishments with the rest of mankind? It is only fair, Johann!

BACH
No worries, Antonio. I find your boastings to be sort of a charm.

VIVALDI
The way I see it... the bigger the ego, the bigger the man. But let us be sure that it is really a man, if you catch my drift.

BACH
Yes, I believe so.

VIVALDI
(tapping his fingers on the table)
Have you pondered more about the composition for the king?

BACH
(yawning)
Oh no, it seems I have not. I hate to say it, but inspiration seems rather scarce as of late.

VIVALDI
Yes, yes. Does it feel like there’s little life in the air? Do you feel a tad stiff?

BACH
Why yes, that sounds quite reasonable.

VIVALDI
(picks up a mini bouncy ball off the table, bounces it off the ground)
There’s a great world out there, somewhere far away... you just pick these glorious blades of inspiration from the soil, one by one into the grasp of your palm... but what they look like I don’t know - I haven’t a scarce idea of what they resemble, in fact. Such things come at you when you least expect them.

BACH
And time, it simply flies by.

VIVALDI
(pauses for a moment, and sighs)
Oh, time... time... who am I kidding? I’m no match for you - I’m as useless as a moldy plum pudding! I’m as hopeless as a fruitfly on a plate of broccoli - inept as a bird with sausages for wings!

BACH
Perhaps Handel and Corelli have been a bit more productive.

VIVALDI
(raises his eyebrows)
Ha! ...Well, you never know.

INT. PALACE - AN IDENTICAL ROOM - DAY

CLOSE ON: CORELLI playing (slowly) the overture to Handel’s “II Trionfo del tempo”.

He tries to hit an “A in altissimo” but it comes out too low. HANDEL, standing beside him, impatiently snatches the violin from his hands. He shows CORELLI how to play the passage properly. He finishes.

HANDEL
(holds up the bow)
I have always admired you, Corelli. Your sonatas in particular leave little to be desired... so you see why your failure to perform this simple passage - it confounds me! The great, accomplished Arcangelo Corelli unable to strike an A in altissimo, unfit to play my first oratorio!

CORELLI
(face turns red)
My dear Saxon, this music is in the French style, of which I have no knowledge.

HANDEL
(shakes his head)
You have sunk a fantastic depth, Corelli, if resorting to excuses.

CORELLI
Dear Saxon... I beg for your forgiveness.

HANDEL
...But I shall forgive you just this once - because, you see... my respect for you has not yet sunk to the abysmal breech - the bottom, if you will. We still have quite a ways to go. And... I expect I won’t witness the “plunge” for quite a long while.

CORELLI
Thank you, my friend.

HANDEL holds the bow up to his eyes and gazes at it.

HANDEL
Tell me something, Corelli. Have you ever sawed off a man’s throat with the bow of a violin?

CORELLI
Why no, dear Saxon, I have not.

HANDEL
(makes a sawing motion with the bow)
I have.

CORELLI
(raises eyebrows)
Have you?

HANDEL
Take for example the orchestra at the opera-house at Hamburg. As a violinist I have the slit the throat of every onlooker visiting from Schleswig-Holstein to Berlin. I have grappled their tongues from their throats and used them as stands for my sheet music! I have rendered them so speechless - their feeble jaws have been dropped so profusely that it leaves a gargantuan hole encircling their head the size of two elephants, a giraffe, and a woolly mammoth with a pair of Bergelmir’s for trousers!

CORELLI
You have the ambition of a king, Saxon.

HANDEL
Oh do shut up, Corelli.

CORELLI
My dear Saxon, may I ask you a question?

HANDEL
Yes, you may.

CORELLI
Why must you be so cruel to me?

HANDEL
(clears his throat)
Why? Well... I don’t know, really...

CORELLI
Well, that’s fair enough.

HANDEL
But I will say this. A man who feels degraded by a few jibes is nothing spectacular.

CORELLI
(scratches his head)
Well, I do try and hide it when I feel... abused.

HANDEL
You mustn’t hide those feelings, Corelli. Rather, be rid of them.

CORELLI
Well, I suppose I could -

VIVALDI opens up the door and prances inside, with BACH behind him.

VIVALDI
Dear Saxon, are you ready to go?

HANDEL
Why yes... yes, I think so. The Schwebend Festival Opera House, is that right? I assume you are quite ready as well...

VIVALDI
The walk is a bit of a way, so we must be swift.

HANDEL
I hear you are quite the expert on... swiftness, Antonio...

VIVALDI
Indeed, I am well known for being quick on my toes, as you may have heard. One minute I’m here, the next second I’m there, and before you know it I’ve stood upon each and every spot that God himself has blessed upon this glorious little earth. Tell me something, dear Saxon, can you compose and write a full concerto in all its parts faster than a copyist can copy it down?

HANDEL
You see, Antonio, my work is essentially a contradiction. With the strike of a feathered pen I have established a paradox within an elaborate structure... so enigmatic that my copyists have, literally, gone out of their minds. Now tell me something, Antonio... do you ever worry that while you’re dashing by at such a quick pace, you may miss something? Something... substantial?

VIVALDI
Oh yes, not a day goes by in which I am not, at least, unsettled by that predicament, and the consequences would seem dire - but with any luck I shall fling myself away before they can effectively verge upon me!

VIVALDI springs out the door.

VIVALDI
(calling back)
Catch me if you’re able.

HANDEL
(irritated look)
Yes, well... let us go... we have very little time.

BACH steps aside and motions HANDEL to step out before him. He does so, and finally, BACH and CORELLI exit the room.

INT. OPERA HOUSE - DAY

The opera house is set up like a Colosseum. There are huge stands encircling a stage at the bottom where the orchestra will perform. There are seats and stands for violins, oboes, and a harpsichord. VIVALDI (the other three trail behind him) struggles past leg after leg to get to their seating arrangements.

VIVALDI
(struggling past leg after leg)
Excuse me... yes, thank you (looks back)... why, you there, you moved your feet back rather quickly... swiftly if you will... I must say I’m quite impressed. Oh (turns back)... yes, excuse me...

Eventually they all sit down; BACH sits beside VIVALDI, while CORELLI and HANDEL sit beside BACH.

VIVALDI
I say, did anyone get a brochure... or whatever it is you call those... those little things that explain what the show consists of? You know, you get them handed out to you before it starts, typically...

BACH
I’m afraid not.

CORELLI
No, I’m afraid I didn’t get one either.

HANDEL
Oh, do shut up. Nobody cares whether or not you got... whatever you call them.

CORELLI
(twitches)
Saxon, I do say... it is great fun to be... an optimist. To... react with nothing when struck down - when attempted to be struck down by an offender... to frolic about freely... and joyously, as if deaf in the ears.

HANDEL
So, you are saying it feels wonderful to ignore me then, eh? That’s quite inconsiderate, and I must say I’m rather offended.

CORELLI
(speechless)
But... I...

VIVALDI
Shh... shh... it’s starting.

The violins start to play. Then comes the harpsichord. Oboes. At last, a woman stands up from her seat and begins to sing.

VIVALDI
(whispering to BACH)
Shrill, but not without merit.

HANDEL
(whispering to VIVALDI)
Sooner or later it will be Almira spewing from her mouth... that will be a sad day indeed.

VIVALDI
(whispering)
Almira... your opera? I’ve only heard of it, but... does it sound nice?

HANDEL
(whispering)
Well what do you think... of course it sounds nice - do you think I’d make it sound unpleasant?

VIVALDI
(whispering)
Well, I assume you would make the notes sound gravelly deliberately just so you could complain later, when the singer sounds wretched and such.

HANDEL
(whispering)
What’s that suppose to mean?

On stage a massively large violinist suddenly jumps up out of his seat. He starts screaming maniacally and waving his arms in the air. The audience gasps. The opera singer gracefully turns to the man and screams in her ‘opera’ voice.

VIVALDI
(whispering to BACH)
Don’t worry... I’ve heard of this. I believe it’s part of the show.

The violinists jump from their seats and back away from the man, seemingly startled. The oboists stay planted firmly in their seats. The man starts running around the stage, screaming, arms flailing. The harpsichordist runs behind the harpsichord and ducks. He occasionally peeks up and gazes through the triangle, then ducks back down again. One of the oboists runs up behind the man and blows the oboe sharply in his ear. The man knocks him to the ground with his arm. The other two oboists run up to him and blow in his ear, but they also get knocked to the ground.

BACH
(whispering to VIVALDI)
Well, this is rather amusing, to say the least.

VIVALDI
(whispering to BACH)
Really? I think it’s a bit dense.

The man bangs on his chest, still screaming. He runs up to a violin player and disarms him, throwing the violin and bow to the ground. He grabs the violins and bows from the other players, pauses, turns to the harpsichord and throws them through the triangle. One by one the violins and bows get thrown through the triangle and narrowly miss the harpsichordist - who ducks just in time. However, the last violin hits him in the face and he falls to the ground. The opera man walks to the middle of the stage and starts singing in a fairly decent manner (with no background instruments).

VIVALDI
(yelling to the opera man)
Get off the stage, you flustering, even-toed ungulate!

BACH
(smiles)
You have my applause, dear Antonio.

VIVALDI
The world is literally transformed with each assessment I utter.

BACH
What do you say we part from this opera house, Antonio... Handel... Corelli? My dear ears are beginning to tear.

VIVALDI
Not before you lift yourself from that seat, Johann, will I vanish from this house like the flash of a mighty lightning bolt!

VIVALDI springs up from his seat and prances toward the exit.

HANDEL
(to BACH)
He has quite a childish way to him.

BACH
A youthful charm, Handel. I think you would be quite surprised at the reaction he gets from women.

HANDEL
I have no doubt that the weaker sex appreciates his free spirit. However... sooner or later he will be dashing by so fast... well, he may miss a thing or two.

BACH
Why, if I couldn’t tell any better, I’d say you were jealous.

HANDEL
Your judgment is disappointing, Johann... I expected better from you.

BACH
(cheerful)
No worries, Handel. Let us part from this house, shall we? I suddenly feel a bit of inspiration advancing my way.

HANDEL
Sure... sure... whatever you say.

BACH heads for the exit.

CORELLI
So, did you enjoy the performance, Saxon?

HANDEL
Oh, do shut up.

EXT. TOWN - DAY

CLOSEUP: BACH.

BACH
And that, my friends, is my idea.

VIVALDI
(claps)
Ingenious! Johann, you have mastered the art of innovation like no other! Your followers shall toil in their quest to match your cunning craft!

HANDEL
It is not quite asinine... but it lacks... élan.

CORELLI
Why, I think it’s remarkable! Strange... but striking!

HANDEL
The “plunge” advances, Corelli. I advise you take caution in your next choice of words.

VIVALDI
Fragrant as a purple lilac, Johann - blessed with the vivacity of Eros! And as such things are - it shan’t age the slightest! It spans the journey of a timeless, indestructible youth! It speaks to me like a spring morning... flawless, and pure, embraced by a golden sunset!

HANDEL
(to BACH)
I am sorry, but I refuse to present this idea to the king. It is foolish. He desires a damned composition... not a lousy game of... render your partner deaf with the piercing shriek of an oboe!

VIVALDI
Don’t listen to him, Johann. He displays the prudence of a fly!

HANDEL just glares at him.

BACH
Nonsense, Antonio. Let him speak his mind. His intellect is a fair match for ours, if it does not indeed surpass.

CORELLI
Why, were you referring to me...? When you mentioned our intellect - I mean, if I am included in your reference to us as a whole - or a third, possibly, I cannot be too sure, but, when you referred to ‘us’ - using the possessive pronoun “us” I mean - in plural -

BACH
Quite so, Corelli. Our group would lack a certain charm if not for your presence.

CORELLI
(delighted)
Why thank you, dear Johann! And Antonio, with all respect, may I ask how you feel about a fellow compatriot accompanying you on your... various promenades?

VIVALDI
(yawns)
Oh... yes. It’s, um, rather nice.

CORELLI
Ah, splendid! And you, dear Saxon?

HANDEL
(snappy)
Do you even have to ask?

CORELLI
(scratches head)
Well... yes, it seems that way... it’s rather hard sometimes, you see...

HANDEL
Fathom the answer yourself, Corelli! I have no patience in sending forth petty ovations to a tail-wagging beggar.

CORELLI
Well... okay, Handel... if that’s the way it goes...

BACH
Let us part, shall we? I have a rather elated feeling about this proposition.

VIVALDI
I say, I shall make haste faster than the brisk wind of an evening grosbeak!

VIVALDI prances down the street.

CORELLI
Aha, I shall catch up to him - if I can! Farewell, fellow friends!

CORELLI prances down the street awkwardly, swinging his hips.

HANDEL
It seems one can immediately ruin a moment simply depending on his status. It is ignorance at its finest, Johann.

BACH
Status, you say? Why, we’ll have to speak of that later, Saxon, for I am off to the royal palace! I bid you a mighty farewell! ...And perhaps you can catch up to me - for one can only fall behind so far.

BACH prances down the street. HANDEL just stares.

INT. KING FREDERICK’S ROOM - DAY

The room is beautiful. Stained glass windows and gold line the walls. There are two couches facing in other in the middle of which lies a round coffee table. King FREDERICK sits on one while Emperor LEOPOLD sits on the other.

FREDERICK
I’ve been chatting on endlessly, Leopold. Do forgive me.

LEOPOLD
Nonsense, Frederick. A man at my age can sustain the lengthiest of conversation.

FREDERICK
So... tell me everything - how’s... how’s everything with you? How’s the wife?

LEOPOLD
(sighs)
Eleanora? As dry as a bone... much like myself. Oh, a man at my age... I’m surprised I’m not dead yet. It’s amazing when you think about it, really...

FREDERICK
Yes...

LEOPOLD
Though I sometimes feel a bit dead already... inside. But anyway, I hope I haven’t been too much of a bother.

FREDERICK
Nonsense, Leopold! It was my invitation, after all. Why, you’re an emperor and I’m just... measly. I actually feel rather guilty, inviting you down here -

LEOPOLD
That is foolishness, Frederick. When a friend feels lonesome it is my sworn obligation to come to his aid!

FREDERICK
(sighs)
And that, Leopold, is why I love you.

LEOPOLD
(gets up from the couch and bows)
It has been a pleasure.

FREDERICK
The pleasure is mine.

LEOPOLD walks to the door and opens it up to see the ‘group’ in his path. They step aside and bow, Leopold says “thank you”, and the group steps inside. BACH holds a flipchart on a stand. CORELLI holds a violin, a bow, and a ball. They walk swiftly in front of the king and bow (though HANDEL’S bowing is a bit slow, and CORELLI’s is a bit fast).

FREDERICK
Please, do have a seat.

VIVALDI
Your majesty, we have culminated our composition!

FREDERICK
(delighted)
Have you, really? Sparkling! I shall inform the orchestra right away -

VIVALDI
But you see... it is a different kind of composition, probably nothing you’re at all used to.

FREDERICK
Friends, be it somber and bleak or sunny and mirthful, you shall not see me disappointed! For I am neither of those things, you see. I yearn for anything - anything at all.

VIVALDI
Well, you see... it is a composition... of a game!

FREDERICK
Why, what is that suppose to mean?

VIVALDI
Johann?

BACH sets the flipchart in front of the king and stands behind it.

VIVALDI
(extending his arms)
We call it... Bachetball!

FREDERICK
Bachetball...? What the devil is that?

VIVALDI
Imagine if you will, your majesty, a stage that spans a width of thirteen meters - a length of twenty-four!

FREDERICK
Why, that’s a bit large... but go on...

VIVALDI
Your majesty, you are aware of the ‘open harpsichord’, correct?

FREDERICK
Possibly so, why?

BACH
(flips the page showing a sketch of an open harpsichord)
A keyboard instrument, simply, that one plucks - in contrast to a strike.

VIVALDI
Imagine if you will, two teams! Each team possesses a harpsichord - wheeled, I might add - as well as a qualified harpsichordist. He stands cautiously in front the harpsichord gazing through its glossy triangle, making sure the other team does not get the ball through its window - for if they do, the opposing team has officially scored one point!

FREDERICK
A ball? ...Go on, I am intrigued.

HANDEL rolls his eyes.

VIVALDI
Yes, a ball!! You see, there are four violinists on each team with only one ball - and with their bow the player must cause the ball to bounce, and that is the only way he is able to travel about the stage!

CORELLI
Ooh, ooh - can I demonstrate? Please??

VIVALDI
Er ... sure, go ahead.

CORELLI points the bow directly down in front of his feet - still placed on the violin - and with the bow dribbles the ball. It creates a typical ‘violin sound’. The ball is too heavy and thus doesn’t bounce that much after the first ‘drop’. He picks up the ball and smiles nervously.

CORELLI
Yes... yes... that’s how it goes.

VIVALDI
(turns back to the king)
And might I add, the only way one can travel about the stage is by simultaneously playing the violin? Johann?

BACH flips the page to an oboe.

BACH
The oboe. Descendant of the shawn - when blown emits a high and reedy sound! Piercing, if blown into the ears.

VIVALDI
That’s right. There are two oboists on each team that must distract the violinists by blowing a piercing shriek into their ear drums! Perhaps it will cause the player to lose the ball, to drop the violin, or to even go deaf in the ears! The results are rather unpredictable at this point...

BACH
But deadly.

HANDEL raises his eyebrows.

VIVALDI
Wait, we seem to have forgotten one more rule, Johann. The ‘theme’?

BACH
Oh goodness, yes! You see, your majesty, the harpsichordist must play a piece on the harpsichord - perhaps he picks it out himself, I’m not quite sure - during each match. Now, as is quite common, whatever piece they’re playing is broken up into stanzas in this format: A... B... A. In other words... theme A, theme B, and theme A again, repeated. Whenever they’re at the theme A portion, they are allowed to move anywhere on the court they desire... wheeling the harpsichord as they play, struggling to avoid the other players while attempting to play the piece - which does not have to sound perfect, by any means.

VIVALDI
But when they reach theme B - which is usually introspective and somber, or else begs the listener’s attention - they must stay in place, but they’re allowed to swivel the harpsichord in a circle so as to avoid getting the ball through their triangle.

CORELLI
(clears throat)
Now... the middle theme is to be played with the proper respect. So any harpsichordist who attempts to speed it up so as to get an outer theme - because he does not want to be still for long, as they violins approach - the referee will be listening, chin in hand, and staring at the harpsichordist sternly...

VIVALDI
Yes... thank you. The harpsichordist now has two worries: The impending crash of the cacophony of violinists and their ragtag militia of oboists... approaching... and the referee staring him in the eye, making sure the middle theme gets the proper respect and isn’t rushed through. During which, he begins to sweat, his heartrate jumps, he’s breathing heavily, all the while swiveling his harpsichord madly to avoid the line of sight of the approaching violinists - and of course, the harpsichordist’s teammates will do their best to defend the harpsichordist, making sure the violinists do not near their target.

BACH
And when he survives the middle theme, he’ll let out a loud sigh and resume traveling about the court, playing an uneven, convoluted theme A. It’s quite simple, really. And that, your majesty, is our idea.

CORELLI
(delighted)
So, what do you think??

FREDERICK stands up from the couch.

FREDERICK
Gentlemen...

BACH, VIVALDI and CORELLI are nervous and eager. HANDEL just stares up at the ceiling.

FREDERICK
I have one question. What kind of a fool do you take me for?

VIVALDI
Well... we...

FREDERICK
Silence. Now, do you honestly expect me... oh, what the hell - I love it!

HANDEL widens his eyes.

FREDERICK
You will each be broken up into two teams. You may choose your ‘partners’ yourself.

VIVALDI nods at BACH reassuringly, who smiles.

CORELLI lets out a happy sigh and puts his hand on HANDEL’S shoulder. HANDEL brushes it off, rather annoyed. CORELLI quickly turns back to the king and smiles nervously.

FREDERICK
I shall supply you with violinists - but I can only spare four at the moment, so you will have to split them up as you see fit.

FREDERICK rings a bell. A servant comes rushing to his aid.

FREDERICK
Schweizer, fetch me four violinists please - I don’t care whom.

SCHWEIZER
(bows)
Yes, your majesty.

SCHWEIZER rushes swiftly out the room.

HANDEL
(clears throat, bows)
Your majesty, I am sorry... but I refuse to take part in this... game. With all due respect, I am far too important to be doing this sort of menial work.

FREDERICK
That is quite alright, Saxon. I bid you farewell.

HANDEL bows, turns around, and walks toward the door.

FREDERICK
(clears throat)
Did I mention, by the way, that there will be a reward?

HANDEL stops in place. He slowly turns around.

HANDEL
A reward.. you say?

FREDERICK
Why, yes. I have decided there will be a grand competition - a final match if you will - at the very end that will determine who will be my next... der generalmusikdirektor. And as well... a grand prize of 120,000 marks for the winning team.

They all seem a bit shocked.

VIVALDI
I must say, your majesty, you thought all this up rather quickly. I’m... quite impressed.

FREDERICK
It does not take a genius, Antonio, to expand upon a brilliant idea. To whom do I owe the tribute?

VIVALDI
You may owe it all to Johann, your majesty... the sharpest innovator in all the world!

CORELLI
Yes, yes! To Johann!

FREDERICK glances at HANDEL.

HANDEL
(annoyed)
Yes, well... you know what I’m going to say, don’t you?

BACH
You all flatter me... but if it was not for you, Saxon... why, I would never have reached this point at all.

VIVALDI
(slightly shocked)
Why... what makes you say that?

BACH
Support means very little if there is no detractor in sight.

They’re all silent for a few seconds.

HANDEL
Nonsense. Utter nonsense...

Four violin players run to Frederick, all lined up in a row. Frederick points to the direction of the group. The violin players immediately spin around.

FREDERICK
Go on, introduce yourselves.

JOHANN KERLL
Johann Kerll! pleasure.

BASTIAN QUANTZ
Bastian Quantz. Pleasure!

GUNTHER GOTTSCHALK
Gunther Gottschalk. Pleasure.

JULIAN KAPPEL
Julian Kappel. Pleasure?

FREDERICK
Do they look like they fit your requirements, gentlemen?

HANDEL
Bouncing a bloody ball... a fine requirement.

VIVALDI
Play... play us a piece.

BASTIAN
(bows)
And what would you like us to play?

HANDEL
Well, how about my third -

VIVALDI
Pachelbel’s Canon, please.

CORELLI glances at HANDEL.

BASTIAN
Certainly. Gentlemen?

They begin to play. It sounds alright, but not great. Their timing definitely isn’t solid. They finish.

VIVALDI
Remarkable. Saxon... Corelli... you may keep all four players for yourself. I say, you’ll need a fair chance.

HANDEL
(raises eyebrows suspiciously)
Hm, that sounds like a mighty fine deal, but I don’t know...

CORELLI
Saxon... this sounds rather suspicious, if you ask me.

HANDEL
Oh shut up, Corelli. Yes... yes, fine... we’ll take them.

FREDERICK
Fair enough. Gentlemen, you will need to recruit as many more players as necessary. The first match will be held no sooner than a week in this very palace. I bid you farewell.

FREDERICK bows. The group bows. They depart.

INT. PALACE - HALLWAY

BACH
Antonio, with all due respect, may I ask why you gave away our two players?

VIVALDI
Ah, Johann... An audience will root for he that plays a violin with skill. Bouncing a ball... why, that’s a bit mundane really, when you think about it.

BACH
(shakes head)
Once again, Vivaldi, you impress me greatly.

VIVALDI
Likewise, Johann... Likewise.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top