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Classic Authors? (1 Viewer)

Darkshine

Member
I'm not too familiar with the big name current-day authors (other than Stephen King who I adore). Which authors of present day do you think will be considered classics in a hundred years or so?
 

Fantasia

Senior Member
Robert Ludlum, I think, will be big a hundred years from now. Certainly, JKR's work will live on for centuries to come. Isaac Asimov has established his name in horror and fantasy already.

::thinks::

John Grisham is a possibility. I couldn't think of anymore right now, but I'm fairly certain I missed a whole chunk of them.

Of course, there are a hundred obscure but extremely talented authors out there that we love, but I'm thinking of the more famous ones.
 
W

Watakshino

I know this may sound odd to some, but I think that Thomas Harris' writing (Lecter trilogy) will become classics.
 

godisthyname

Senior Member
maybe cult classics - they have a certain lasting quality about them though I doubt they will rank right at the top of future classics lists
 

Lily

Senior Member
Well, Amy Tan is already a classic, isn't she? I think Steven Saylor will be one . . . I love his mysteries . . . all the authors I enjoy are already classics!! :cry: :roll:
 

kinetickyle

Senior Member
Definately William Gibson. He predicted many things in Neuromancer that are reality today. Michael Crichton, as well.
 

Fantasia

Senior Member
X'D I haven't read any of her stuff... but I've heard Danielle Steel mentioned so many times among most of my non-reader friends. It must *mean* something.
 

Lily

Senior Member
Maybe she'll be the classic of shmaltz. She writes the sobby romantic stuff that really has no substance at all . . . I read one of her books- it was really well written, but . . . but . . . it's just . . . not :?
 

Fantasia

Senior Member
Sometimes I wonder if the critics didn't think of the Brontes or Louisa May Alcott as shmaltzes. X'D

I mean, don't get me wrong. I love those women. (God help me if I should be insulting any of them with my silly little thoughts!) They are the reason I love reading books! But then I have a tendency to read those intros you find with the classics -- you know, the ones written by editors/friends of the author/etc. -- and in Jane Austen's books, critics of "Pride and Prejudice" appreciated the fact that she didn't go into "scandal and drama her contemporaries were so eager to apply." It just got me thinking.
 
M

Myxamatosis

J.K. rowling will probably be famous in 100 years, just as Tolkein.

...I realised... I dont think Ive ever read a "modern" novel.
 

Farror

WF Veterans
I think that Robert Jordan will definatly be a classic. As soon as he finnishes :evil: ! (BTW Myxamotosis, it's spelt Tolkien)
 
M

Myxamatosis

Farror said:
I think that Robert Jordan will definatly be a classic. As soon as he finnishes :evil: ! (BTW Myxamotosis, it's spelt Tolkien)

thank God you told me! just after I read this the spelling Gestapo came to my door and asked me to spell it for them. I before E except after C or whatever. Thanks!

and finishes has one 'N', dude. Unless he's from finland and you were trying to be funny. Or I'm being dumb and you spelt it wrong on purpose.

Anywho, spelling is easier in Spanish.
 

godisthyname

Senior Member
J.G. Ballard. I'm told he is considered by many to be the greatest living short story writer. I've yet to read any of his short stories but what I've read of his novels I was impressed by - Crash, Empire of the Sun, Kindness of Women, Atrocity Exhibition.
 

Plitec

Member
Rober Ludlum is a must to read. I also think Rankin will be remembered for years to come for the 'John Rebus' novels... or that could just be me... whatever.

I can't 'adore' Stephen King.. some of his later stuff isn't as well written in my opinion. 'From a Buick 8' for example was just, weak :?
 

Fantasia

Senior Member
Oh, I think Stephen King will go down in history, but I admit that I only really love one of his many books (and I read a lot of his books before...): "Misery"

I haven't read "The Green Mile" but it's movie just nestled into my heart right well. ^_^
 
G

Guest

know this may sound odd to some, but I think that Thomas Harris' writing (Lecter trilogy) will become classics.
-Watakshino

I agree 100% I also think Maya Angelou will be remembered forever :D
Tom Clancy, John Grisham, and J.K Rowling.
 
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